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By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur will announce Wednesday that she will become the first contender for that office since 1994 to accept public financing of her campaign - effectively limiting her spending on the primary to about $2.5 million. Mizeur, a two-term delegate from Montgomery County, will announce her decision as part of her roll out of a broad proposal to curb the influence of special interests on elections. Among the provisions will be replacement of Maryland's current, limited financing scheme with a comprehensive system.
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NEWS
By Phil Andrews | April 17, 2014
For many years, special interests - particularly the development industry - have played an inordinate role in financing the campaigns of county executive and county council candidates throughout Maryland. Once elected, these officials often negotiate or vote on matters of concern to those who financially supported them, such as land use and zoning issues. Political Action Committees representing unions that negotiate contracts with county executives (that require approval by county councils)
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The State Board of Elections ruled Thursday that Republican gubernatorial candidate Charles Lollar is ineligible for public financing because he missed the legal deadline to apply. The board voted unanimously to deny the waiver request by Lollar, a Charles County business executive. Jared Demarinis, executive director of candidacy and campaign finance, told the board that Lollar missed the Feb. 25 to apply because his campaign had forgotten that was the deadline for applying for public financing as well as for filing candidacy papers.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 10, 2014
This is a column about campaign finance reform. And your eyes glazed over just then, didn't they? That's the problem with this problem. Americans know that government truly of, by and for the people is unlikely if not impossible so long as the system is polluted by billions of dollars in contributions from corporations and individual billionaires. Half of us, according to Gallup, would like to see public financing of campaigns; nearly 80 percent want to limit campaign fund-raising.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Once again, The Sun urges the institution of public campaign financing, implying that if such a plan were instituted, private campaign contributions would disappear and we'd all live happily ever after ("Appearance of conflict," Nov. 29). Nothing could be further from the truth. For one thing, there is that pesky First Amendment. For another, as our president demonstrated in his 2008 campaign, if you have enough private contributions, you can finance a campaign very nicely without utilizing public financing.
NEWS
By Phil Andrews | April 17, 2014
For many years, special interests - particularly the development industry - have played an inordinate role in financing the campaigns of county executive and county council candidates throughout Maryland. Once elected, these officials often negotiate or vote on matters of concern to those who financially supported them, such as land use and zoning issues. Political Action Committees representing unions that negotiate contracts with county executives (that require approval by county councils)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan said Monday that he will accept public financing in the GOP primary, becoming the second person seeking the office this year to participate in a system that had been dormant for almost two decades. The announcement came as Hogan and his running mate, former Ehrlich administration Cabinet member Boyd Rutherford, filed their candidacy papers at the State Board of Elections in Annapolis. Hogan said the decision "sends a great message.
NEWS
By David Donnelly | November 22, 2006
[XXXXX] WASHINGTON -- Tired of politics as usual and sickened by corruption and ethics scandals, voters gave the next Congress an unmistakable mandate: Clean up your act. Forty-two percent of voters said corruption was the single most important factor in determining whom to vote for, according to a major exit poll. These "anti-corruption" voters chose Democrats over Republicans by 60 percent to 38 percent. To put this into context, corruption ranked ahead of terrorism (40 percent), the economy (39 percent)
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Of all the bad ideas in the Republican budget proposals -- and there are plenty -- the least defensible may be their plan to kill the public financing of presidential election campaigns.The system was put in place 20 years ago as a response to Watergate and the abuses that had developed in the financing of campaigns -- most particularly the influence enjoyed by a few fat cats who financed candidates with multimillion-dollar contributions.Now, in the name of deficit reduction, the Republicans intend to scuttle the system -- and open the door once again to another generation of influence-seekers.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | May 12, 1994
THERE'S a $3 million jackpot in Maryland's treasury waiting to be tapped, but only candidates for governor need apply.For the first time since the tax checkoff for public financing of political campaigns was authorized in the post-Watergate reform frenzy, the state will hand out money to gubernatorial candidates and their running mates for lieutenant governor who agree to legally imposed spending limits.The money has been held in escrow, gathering interest for more than 20 years because succeeding General Assemblys couldn't agree on how to allocate the funds.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 7, 2014
Forty years ago, Congress enacted sweeping limits on political campaign spending in the wake of a shocking disclosure that one man - Chicago insurance executive W. Clement Stone - had given more than $3 million for the 1972 reelection of President Richard M. Nixon. The amount seemed outlandish then, in a campaign in which Nixon waltzed to victory over his Democratic opponent, Sen. George McGovern, winning 49 states and losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. It was an easily predictable drubbing.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The State Board of Elections ruled Thursday that Republican gubernatorial candidate Charles Lollar is ineligible for public financing because he missed the legal deadline to apply. The board voted unanimously to deny the waiver request by Lollar, a Charles County business executive. Jared Demarinis, executive director of candidacy and campaign finance, told the board that Lollar missed the Feb. 25 to apply because his campaign had forgotten that was the deadline for applying for public financing as well as for filing candidacy papers.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
Maryland gubernatorial candidate Del. Heather Mizeur has decided to run a campaign based upon returning power to the people rather than caving in to the big money that dominates most elections. Ms. Mizeur became the first candidate for the office since 1994 to accept public financing for her campaign - rejecting the notion that elections must be rigged and bought by the biggest spender. Her opponents in the Democratic primary, state Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, have all gone the other direction, wooing lobbyists and corporate executives for cash and more ad time.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur said Tuesday that she doesn't want to spend the more than $500 million it would take to replace the badly deteriorated Baltimore jail, but said she recognizes something must be done to replace the "decrepit" state-run facility. Appearing at a Baltimore Sun Newsmakers Forum, Mizeur said that while building a new jail seems to go against her pledge to end "mass incarceration" in Maryland, it would be "inhumane" not to find a way to improve the facility - parts of which are more than a century old. "I have tried to find a way to just say no to it," she said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erica Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
For Maryland TV viewers, the blitz is about to start. Democratic gubernatorial rivals Douglas F. Gansler and Anthony G. Brown announced Wednesday that they have bought time on local stations and will launch television ad campaigns over the next two days. It is the beginning of what is certain to become a drumbeat of 60-second spots that will continue through primary day June 24, at a cost running into millions of dollars in both the Baltimore and Washington media markets. A third Democrat in the race for governor, Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County, is using public financing and is operating on a much tighter budget.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Regarding your editorial on campaign financing, in what way is a checked box on a tax return not a "taxpayer-financed" campaign ( "Campaign reform in action," Feb. 4)? One can make an argument for limiting citizens' ability to participate in the political process through campaign donations. However, taxing me and using those dollars to fund a candidate that I would never vote for turns the argument on its head. Not only has my voice been softened, but I get to pay for the privilege as well.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
I recently read the "Campaign reform in action" (Feb. 5) editorial endorsing public financing of political campaigns, and I could not agree more. As a young person and relatively new voter, contending with the post-Citizens United election system is disheartening. I'm fresh out of college and work for a nonprofit, and with big elections coming up in Maryland and across the country, it's one of the first opportunities my peers and I will have to donate to candidates we support, albeit in a small way. Unfortunately, it feels like our contributions are meaningless pittance in comparison to multi-million dollar donations from special interests.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Conservative pro-business Republican Larry Hogan, a former appointments secretary under Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., and Del. Heather Mizeur, a liberal Democrat and ground-breaking advocate for gay rights who favors legalizing marijuana, wouldn't seem to have much in common politically, aside from the fact both are running for governor. But as of this week, they share an important common denominator — both have chosen to accept public financing of their primary campaigns. That's good news because it demonstrates the viability of public campaign financing in Maryland after a 20-year dry spell.
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