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NEWS
October 14, 1990
County residents will get their first chance this week to express their views on a draft proposal that would give the county's planning and zoning director the power to deny approval for a development if public facilities cannot support the growth.The County Council will conduct a public forum on the proposal at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at Southampton Middle School in Bel Air. Public comment on the proposal is encouraged at the forum.The forum is not considered a public hearing because the draft law has not been formally introduced as legislation.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
Last week, the media finally reported that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance in Howard County needs updating, and even then only because the two county executive candidates started talking about it ( "County executive candidates to revisit public facilities requirements," April 4). The media has ignored until now what others have long been talking about. The current ordinance can slow development if elementary schools and nearby street intersections are not ready to handle the increased load.
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NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | March 18, 2007
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer is seeking to lift the building delay enacted last fall by the city council and to put off a public facilities bill - moves she said would streamline the planning process but that opponents say will thwart efforts to control growth. The adequate public facilities ordinance (APFO) would require that adequate fire, police, water and road support be in place before major new developments could move forward. The current development delay halted new projects until the legislation is put in place.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
A bill that would protect transgender people from discrimination in jobs, housing and other areas gained preliminary approval Friday in the Senate. Transgender discrimination already is barred by local ordinance in some areas, including Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Montgomery County. The Senate measure would extend transgender rights statewide, making explicit that people may not be denied jobs, housing or access to public facilities on the basis of their gender identity, even if different than the sex they were assigned at birth.  Although laws already bar discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation, courts have not held them to apply to claims of transgender discrimination.
NEWS
March 9, 1998
THE CARROLL COUNTY Commissioners have laid the foundation for controlled growth in the county over the next six years, finally enacting the Concurrency Management Ordinance.The long-debated measure, rejected in nearly identical form by the commissioners just last month, aims to link residential housing growth with available public utilities and services.Some 6,000 building lots would be approved over the next six years, if the lots meet adequate public facilities standards.The intent of the new law is quite reasonable: to set minimum requirements for schools, roads, sewer and water, and public safety services in order to adequately serve new houses and developments.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Baltimore County wants to sell three government properties to developers to raise money for air conditioning and better technology at schools in Dundalk, Randallstown and Towson. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is expected to announce a plan Tuesday to put the public facilities up for bid and find better spots for the government services located there. The buildings are the North Point Government Center on Wise Avenue in Dundalk, the Towson fire station on York Road, and the Randallstown police substation on Liberty Road.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
When the Harford County Council meets Tuesday, members will debate at least a half-dozen proposed changes to a bill to ease crowding of public schools by changing the adequate public facilities laws. Four of the recommendations come from a nine-member task force that has been working since March to find ways to prevent schools from exceeding their designed capacities. The task force ended its work abruptly Thursday evening as tempers flared and shouting erupted across the table. Frank F. Hertsch, who represents the homebuilding industry, became upset when no other member of the panel seconded his motion that would have resulted in the redistricting of students.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2003
A panel of Howard County education leaders, developers, activists and public officials met last night to discuss ways to improve the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance (APFO), a widely criticized law that tries to curb school crowding by slowing housing development. "I don't even really know if APFO has ever worked," said school board member Courtney Watson. "We have so many schools that are overcrowded." APFO, among other things, restricts construction for up to four years in areas where schools are projected to be 15 percent or more over capacity three years in the future.
FEATURES
July 8, 1997
A national organization dedicated to helping people with "shy bladder syndrome" -- a phobia known clinically as paruresis -- will hold a three-day workshop in Baltimore next week. The event will be a chance for sufferers to discuss and, perhaps, to overcome their fear of using public facilities. It's a phobia that causes some people to stay away from concerts, ballgames or other public events and even to avoid jobs in office buildings and other places that afford little privacy. The meeting, July 18-20, will be based at the student union of the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 23, 1990
A proposed law that would give the county's planning and zoning director the power to deny approval for a development if public facilities couldn't support the growth was unveiled at a County Council work session Thursday.The so-called adequate public facilities proposal was made by the seven-member county Services Study Commission, which has been examining the issue for about two years.After the two-hour work session, council members said it could be another year of public hearings and revisions to the proposal before the county decides what the law would mandate.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
From Interstate 95 in North Laurel, the first road you take toward Wincopia Farms rides a dividing line: suburban subdivisions on the left, farmland to the right rolling to the banks of the Middle Patuxent River. A big portion of that open land on the right, once owned by the same farming family for generations, is expected to soon raise a crop of 220 single-family homes. Beazer Homes USA bought the nearly 128-acre Wincopia property off Gorman Road last month with the intention to start building next spring and welcome the first residents that fall if its plans clear the last two hurdles for county approval.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
The Maryland Department of Juvenile Services has asked again to expand the capacity of a privately run residential facility in Carroll County to twice the state's limit, saying there is a backlog of young offenders who are waiting in detention centers instead of getting treatment. The department first broached doubling the capacity of Silver Oak Academy from 48 to 96 beds more than a year ago. It was a departure from the state's long-term plan to create smaller treatment centers for young offenders.
EXPLORE
June 11, 2013
Two projects in rather close proximity to each other are getting a lot of attention from the people who live near where they're proposed. While both have the potential to result in similar kinds of traffic problems, one is in keeping with laws already on the books, while the other will require a change in the law before it can be built. Specifically, plans to build an apartment complex of 285 units on 17.7 acres near the historic Mt. Soma farm at the southern end of the Bel Air Bypass are within what zoning allows on the land in question.
NEWS
By Sandy Apgar | May 8, 2013
There's a P3 in your future. Maryland is poised to join 34 states and key federal agencies in transforming the way government works. The new mantra, "P3," is shorthand for public-private partnerships. Maryland's P3 legislation, championed by Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, enables state agencies to engage business in planning, financing, building and operating public projects, from roads and rail to schools and other infrastructure. These could offset up to 10 percent of the state's capital budget, or $300 million annually, and create thousands of jobs.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | January 28, 2013
At the Carroll County Senate Delegation's public hearing last week at the County Office Building in Westminster, state Sen. Joseph Getty, a Republican who represents District 5, opened the session expressing disappointment that the County House Delegation had decided to hold its own separate hearing the following day. "I invited the House Delegation to participate, (but) they chose to meet on Saturday (Jan. 19)," said Getty, the outgoing delegation chairman who recently handed over the chairmanship to state Sen. David Brinkley, a Republican who represents District 4. "I think that it's a disservice to the public to have to come out to two meetings," he said.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | August 18, 1991
To discourage farmers from selling land to developers, county planners recommend that the county start its own program to buy developmentrights on agricultural land.That was one of several ideas planners outlined as they explained a rural plan to the County Council in aspecial presentation Tuesday.Michael Paone, an agricultural planner in the county Planning andZoning Department, said the county might consider paying owners of agricultural land with bonds instead of cash. Under such a bond-payment arrangement, landowners would be entitled to receive tax-exempt interest payments for 30 years -- the life of the bond.
NEWS
June 26, 1995
Whether politically motivated or not, the Howard County school board's decision to oppose an Elkridge housing development on the grounds it would exacerbate school crowding raises a big question. If the problem is overcrowding, why didn't the county's much ballyhooed adequate public facilities legislation put a stop to it? In other words, are the adequate public facilities rules adequate enough?Answering the question is difficult, in part because the school board has injected politics into the process.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Baltimore County wants to sell three government properties to developers to raise money for air conditioning and better technology at schools in Dundalk, Randallstown and Towson. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is expected to announce a plan Tuesday to put the public facilities up for bid and find better spots for the government services located there. The buildings are the North Point Government Center on Wise Avenue in Dundalk, the Towson fire station on York Road, and the Randallstown police substation on Liberty Road.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The Howard County school board, in the second vote this month, approved a measure that would determine which school communities are designated as capable of absorbing development. The panel voted to approve a chart that school officials craft to denote areas ripe for development under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. According to APFO guidelines, school capacity must be deemed adequate before approve is given to residential projects, and the pace of such development must match elementary and middle school capacity.
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