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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 11, 1992
Princess Caroline danced in public for the first time in 22 months (yes, someone really keeps a record of these things) at last week's star-studded Red Cross Ball in Monaco. Caroline, 35, had been shunning jet-set galas since her husband, Stefano Casiraghi, was killed in a powerboat accident in October 1990.While Caroline was spotted dancing only with her brother, Prince Albert, she was seen talking to two men who surely have done a two-step in their day -- Gregory Peck and Frank Sinatra, the latter, of course, gracing the fund-raiser with a rendition of "My Way."
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
Substance abuse counselor Mike Gimbel's call for canceling Baltimore's Moonrise Festival raises an obvious question: Isn't there another "expert" on the subject who can actually speak objectively about substance abuse ( "Anti-drug advocate calls for Moonrise Festival to be canceled," Aug. 7)? With all due respect to Mr. Gimbel's intentions and expertise, his opinions and statements are no more than veiled attempts to keep himself relevant, and they appear to be frankly self-serving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 16, 1992
The photographer known as Weegee -- Arthur Fellig, by actual name -- was a city rat with a Speed Graphic camera who roamed the streets of New York in the hours after midnight. With a mini-darkroom custom built in the trunk of his car and a police radio to guide him like a North Star of the demimonde, he wandered from atrocity to atrocity, snapping dazzlingly immediate shots of life and death, urban style, '40s-style. You've seen his brash, flash-blasted pix a million times and not known it: the hood with his head tilted back, his ruined face spewing rivers of blood behind a bullet-starred windshield; the screaming survivor of a fire that is consuming her children in a blazing tenement; the sailor grabbing a kiss from a pretty gal outside a U.S.O club.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Esquire magazine, particularly its Style Blog, has big worries that start with one side of Joe Flacco's face and stretch, hairily, to the other. It's the unibrow. And they want him to lose it -- now -- lest it becomes a trend, leading to what they think could be a terrifying unibrowification of America. Style Blog writer Kurt Soller threw down his demands Wednesday in a post called, "How to Fight the Forthcoming Unibrow Nation. " He Posted right about the time Twitter was lighting up with people mocking Flacco's boast of being the best quarterback in the NFL. With Flacco and his face fur so in the news, coming right on another very public unibrown showing -- Anthony Davis and his Kentucky Wildcats triumphing in the NCAA championship game -- Esquire was concerned.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 1, 1997
Bryant Gumbel starts earning his $7 million a year tonight on CBS."Public Eye With Bryant Gumbel" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) has generated all sorts of ballyhoo since it was announced earlier this year: Not only does it feature Gumbel, whose decision earlier this year to sign with CBS was a rare piece of good news for its embattled news division, but it's also airing live (which means there were no preview tapes to be sent out).Tonight's debut is scheduled to feature Gumbel's interview with Gene McKinney, the Army sergeant major accused of sexual misconduct.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | July 20, 1992
The old Roger B. Hayden would have quietly visited the smoldering Granite stump dump fire, looked the smoky scene over with his fire chief and aides, and departed without fanfare.No more.Last week, the new Roger B. Hayden was unveiled. His visit to Granite was listed on his official schedule, and all four Baltimore television stations were there to record him inspecting the stubborn fire.With that appearance -- and the demotion previously of Carol Hirschburg, his former spokeswoman -- the first-term Baltimore County executive abandoned his 19-month effort to stay out of the public eye and launched a determined effort to shape the public's perception of his administration.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- They wore baseball caps and golf shirts and, some of them, hearing aids. They talked about wives and ex-wives, reminisced about 10-cent bottles of beer and just laughed a lot. Only the pointed gold medals dangling from their necks hinted that this was a convention of old heroes.There was Lewis Lee Millett, his Army crew cut still sharp at age 77, who in Korea led a bayonet charge up a hill against enemy fire. And Ronald Ray, 56, who in Vietnam shielded his men from a grenade by diving in front of it. And Jack Montgomery, a small, quiet man of 80, who in World War II killed 11 Germans and captured 32 others in a single battle.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
At last fall's groundbreaking for the Marriott Residence Inn in downtown Baltimore, Mayor Martin O'Malley spotted a bearish, gregarious man who has become a familiar face at such events. "Are you in this one too?" the mayor recalls asking. "Yep," replied Ronald H. Lipscomb. At 48, Lipscomb is one of the city's most prominent black builders and, lately, developers. Thanks in part to a system meant to create opportunities for minorities, he holds stakes in projects from Harbor East to South Baltimore to midtown and beyond.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Substance abuse counselor Mike Gimbel's call for canceling Baltimore's Moonrise Festival raises an obvious question: Isn't there another "expert" on the subject who can actually speak objectively about substance abuse ( "Anti-drug advocate calls for Moonrise Festival to be canceled," Aug. 7)? With all due respect to Mr. Gimbel's intentions and expertise, his opinions and statements are no more than veiled attempts to keep himself relevant, and they appear to be frankly self-serving.
NEWS
June 18, 1994
Even before charges were lodged against O.J. Simpson in the killing of his ex-wife and another man, and before the football star disappeared, people all over were shaking their heads.This wasn't some kooky rock star with whom many people could not identify. It wasn't about the travails of a politician, of whom people often think the worst. Nor about some spoiled millionaire athlete who was likely to self-destruct all along. This bad news involved that rare breed of celebrity who fused fame and grace.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
As a recently retired 37-year veteran of the Baltimore City Public Schools, I read with considerable interest your recent front page report on the cheating at George Washington Elementary School. While I in no way condone cheating in any form, it is possible responsibility for this can be attributed to both the school and the school system. The pressure to document acceptable numbers on tests has become almost an obsession. It's not far afield to compare this to college basketball and football coaches on the bubble when their teams fail to produce praiseworthy win/loss records.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
Curly Neal was a Harlem Globetrotter when that really meant something - in the days when he and Meadowlark Lemon and their teammates were all over the television dial, making moves on the basketball court that seemed just short of superhuman while, simultaneously, living up to their reputation as the Clown Princes of Basketball. Nobody played the game better, or with more enthusiasm. Even people who didn't know a jump shot from an airball knew the Globetrotters, and loved watching them play.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Detectives in the HBO crime series The Wire go after bad guys in Baltimore wearing shirts and tactical gear made by Under Armour. The thugs in the television show wear hats and hoodie sweat shirts manufactured by the sportswear company. Golf characters in a Tiger Woods Golf video game play longer and better in hot weather when they put on an Under Armour polo-style shirt. And in the movie Gridiron Gang, the team of troubled youths and their coach, played by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, hit the field in Under Armour uniforms.
NEWS
May 21, 2008
Big Brother hasn't yet arrived in Baltimore, but he's knocking on the door. There are more than 450 surveillance cameras perched around the city - high on street corner poles, spotting cars crossing the Key Bridge from an Inner Harbor rooftop, recording comings and goings in subway and light rail stations, monitoring every movement in dozens of other locations, both discreet and highly visible. While the cameras collect a dizzying montage of the city in motion, they have been of limited use in solving crimes and have been only moderately helpful in deterring illegal conduct, security experts agree.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 14, 2006
As a student at the University of Maryland, College Park in the 1960s, Tom Beck dreamed of being a photojournalist, jetting to hotspots around the world with a Leica and a couple of lenses. Things didn't turn out quite that way. REFLECTIONS FROM THE HEART: PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID SEYMOUR / / Through June 4 / / Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St., N.W., Washington / / 202-639-1700 Tom Beck Age: 59 Raised: Born in Baltimore, lived in Mountain Home, Idaho, Westover, Mass., and "all points in between."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
At last fall's groundbreaking for the Marriott Residence Inn in downtown Baltimore, Mayor Martin O'Malley spotted a bearish, gregarious man who has become a familiar face at such events. "Are you in this one too?" the mayor recalls asking. "Yep," replied Ronald H. Lipscomb. At 48, Lipscomb is one of the city's most prominent black builders and, lately, developers. Thanks in part to a system meant to create opportunities for minorities, he holds stakes in projects from Harbor East to South Baltimore to midtown and beyond.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
As a recently retired 37-year veteran of the Baltimore City Public Schools, I read with considerable interest your recent front page report on the cheating at George Washington Elementary School. While I in no way condone cheating in any form, it is possible responsibility for this can be attributed to both the school and the school system. The pressure to document acceptable numbers on tests has become almost an obsession. It's not far afield to compare this to college basketball and football coaches on the bubble when their teams fail to produce praiseworthy win/loss records.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Esquire magazine, particularly its Style Blog, has big worries that start with one side of Joe Flacco's face and stretch, hairily, to the other. It's the unibrow. And they want him to lose it -- now -- lest it becomes a trend, leading to what they think could be a terrifying unibrowification of America. Style Blog writer Kurt Soller threw down his demands Wednesday in a post called, "How to Fight the Forthcoming Unibrow Nation. " He Posted right about the time Twitter was lighting up with people mocking Flacco's boast of being the best quarterback in the NFL. With Flacco and his face fur so in the news, coming right on another very public unibrown showing -- Anthony Davis and his Kentucky Wildcats triumphing in the NCAA championship game -- Esquire was concerned.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Noyes and Andrew Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Pop princess-turned-actress Mandy Moore and her Chasing Liberty co-star Matthew Goode casually munch on jelly beans in a suite at the historic Hay Adams hotel overlooking the White House lawn -- a fitting backdrop for an interview, since their film, opening tomorrow, is an enchanting tale of a first daughter fed up with her protective parents, Secret Service agents and the media, who monitor her every move. Not unlike her character, Anna Foster -- whose Secret Service code name is "Liberty" -- Moore, 19, was catapulted into the public eye at an early age. But she doesn't claim to know what it's like to be Chelsea Clinton or Barbara and Jenna Bush.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
Never mind that she and her family have traveled the world singing and been the subject of one of the most beloved musicals of all time. Agathe von Trapp spent much of her life as a virtual recluse. She was 43 before she stopped relying on someone older and wiser and went to the grocery store and the bank herself. For nearly 40 more years after that, she interacted with few people outside a private kindergarten classroom in Glyndon. But eventually, her desire for the world to know the truth behind The Sound of Music took over.
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