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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury found a man police named as "Public Enemy No. One" guilty of murder Wednesday, his attorney said. Over a year ago, a police commander stood at a Greektown playground where Ramon Rodriguez, 21, was killed and branded Capone Chase, 20, as the department's most wanted suspect. State's attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said he was pleased by the outcome of the case. "Mr. Chase is a dangerous and cold-blooded individual," he said. "We hope this result brings some measure of closure to the victim's family and friends.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury found a man police named as "Public Enemy No. One" guilty of murder Wednesday, his attorney said. Over a year ago, a police commander stood at a Greektown playground where Ramon Rodriguez, 21, was killed and branded Capone Chase, 20, as the department's most wanted suspect. State's attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said he was pleased by the outcome of the case. "Mr. Chase is a dangerous and cold-blooded individual," he said. "We hope this result brings some measure of closure to the victim's family and friends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 25, 1992
GREATEST MISSESPublic Enemy (Def Jam/Chaos 53014)Any act that has ever cracked the charts can cobble together some sort of greatest hits package, but how many can create a credible album out of their misses? Public Enemy, for one. On "Greatest Misses," the group avoids the obvious by resurrecting and remixing such shoulda-been-hits as the funky "Who Stole the Soul" and the driving "You're Gonna Get Yours." Of course, it doesn't hurt that P.E. fleshes out the collection with a half-dozen new tracks, the best of which -- like the Bush-and-Clinton-bashing "Tie Goes to the Runner" or the incumbent-indicting "Hazy Shade of Criminal" -- boast an angry election-year edge.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
As the murder trial of a man Baltimore police labeled "Public Enemy No. 1" started this week, a prosecutor added a new twist to the case: Ramon Rodriguez was murdered, she said, because his killer had discovered he was helping police with an investigation. When authorities named Capone Chase as their most-wanted fugitive in July 2013, they made no mention that his victim was a police informant. They focused instead on the brutal details of the crime: The 21-year-old Rodriguez on his knees, shot through the head at a Greektown playground.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 6, 1991
PERHAPS THE last place any rap fan would expect to see a white-hooded Klansman would be onstage at a Public Enemy concert. Yet there he was, ol' "Bernie Crosshouse" himself, checking out the crowd before P.E. -- topping a seven-act bill -- hit the stage at the Baltimore Arena last night.How come?Call it a reality check. "Bernie" was Public Enemy's way of driving home a point -- that so long as the black community continues to put up with drug dealing, black-on-black violence and other self-destructive social ills, it will be doing the Klan's work for it.It's a tough message, and one even the best rap groups would have a hard time conveying without seeming preachy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 6, 1991
Perhaps the last place any rap fan would expect to see a white-hooded Klansman would be onstage at a Public Enemy concert. Yet there he was, ol' "Bernie Crosshouse" himself, checking out the crowd before P.E. -- topping a seven-act bill -- hit the stage at the Baltimore Arena last night.How come?Call it a reality check. "Bernie" was Public Enemy's way of driving home a point -- that so long as the black community continues to put up with drug dealing, black-on-black violence and other self-destructive social ills, it will be doing the Klan's work for it.It's a tough message, and one even the best rap groups would have a hard time conveying without seeming preachy.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 11, 2007
You got it / What it takes / Go get it / Where you want it / Come get it / Get involved / 'Cause the brothers in the street / Are willing to work it out -- "Brothers Gonna Work It Out" PUBLIC ENEMY / / Performs 7 p.m. Tuesday at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, Power Plant Live / / 410-244-1131
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine fTC and J. D. Considine fTC,Pop Music Critic | December 27, 1992
"It's called 'By the Time I Get to Arizona,' and it shows several of that state's officials being killed for refusing to adopt Martin Luther King's birthday as a state holiday. The group Public Enemy calls it 'a revenge fantasy,' but many who gather to honor Dr. King today call it a disgrace to his memory."That was the way Forrest Sawyer introduced the Jan. 20 edition of ABC's "Nightline," and on the whole, it made for a fairly concise summary of the controversy then swirling around the rap video.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2004
"I try to make 'em laugh, and I try to give them an insight into me and whatever I care about at that particular moment. But it's not like, 'You need to hear this!' A message? That's for other people. I'm not Public Enemy. I'm not Mort Sahl." -- Comedian Chris Rock.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
Musical extravaganza -- Howard County Players, a musical theater group of adults and Howard County high school students, will present Cole Porter's tap-dancing musical extravaganza Anything Goes at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at Long Reach High School, 6101 Old Dobbin Lane, Columbia. Above, Karice Parada is Bonnie LaTour, and Roger Schulman portrays Moonface Martin, Public Enemy No. 13. The production is directed by Howard County drama teacher Mo Dutterer. Tickets, which can be reserved in advance or purchased at the door, are $10; $7 for senior citizens and students.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A Baltimore man dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" by city police last summer after being linked to a string of shootings is in trouble again - this time accused of stabbing another inmate in the head in an argument over using the telephone, court records show. Darryl Martin Anderson's nickname apparently has had staying power even as Anderson remains in jail awaiting trial, according to charging documents. When police asked the victim, inmate Gregory Hollomon, who had stabbed him, he replied, "Public Enemy No. 1. " Anderson, 26, was arrested in Alabama last summer after a yearlong hunt by authorities in two jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Authorities say the woman found with Christopher Goode when he was arrested in Virginia Beach is the same woman he was accused of stabbing multiple times last month, and officials say she had helped him flee.  Police called attention to Goode last week, calling him their top priority fugitive and "Public Enemy No. 1" in connection with the Sept. 13 attack. According to charging doucments, Goode is accused of stabbing the woman -- the mother of his child -- 10 times in her neck and chest area.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
At a news conference convened on a bluff overlooking the photogenic Inner Harbor, two top-ranking Baltimore police commanders stood before a bank of television cameras and revealed the identity of a shooting suspect they were seeking. They called him Baltimore's "Public Enemy No. 1. " And less than an hour later, Jamal Williams was in handcuffs. This summer, police quickly arrested all three of the men they have given the "public enemy" distinction, a most-wanted program established to nab dangerous suspects and elicit more public cooperation in a city known for witness intimidation and "no snitching" street codes.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Less than an hour after Baltimore police announced they were looking for the shooting suspect they had labeled their latest "Public Enemy No. 1," officers announced he was in custody. Jamal Williams, 20, was arrested on suspicion of shooting into a crowd early Sunday in Northeast Baltimore and injuring two people near Morgan State University, Baltimore police said. At a press conference staged at Federal Hill Park overlooking the Inner Harbor, police described Williams as a "violent criminal" who had callously fired into a group of seven or eight people, wounding a man in the right shin and a woman in the left forearm.
NEWS
By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
A 19-year-old man suspected of killing another man at a playground in Greektown this month was captured early Thursday. Capone Chase, whom Baltimore police had publicized as the city's "Public Enemy No. 1," was arrested without incident about 4:45 a.m. in the 1500 block of Pennsylvania Ave. in the city's Upton neighborhood, police said. According to an arrest warrant, Chase and another man lured 21-year-old Ramon Rodriguez to the 4600 block of Gough St. in Greektown on July 13, then made him kneel and empty his pockets before fatally shooting him. "We highlighted him because he was responsible for a cold-blooded, calculated murder in the middle of a playground used by children," police spokesman Sgt. Eric Kowalczyk said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Tipped that Darryl Martin Anderson's year on the run had taken him to Birmingham, Ala., U.S. Marshals set up outside an apartment complex Wednesday morning and watched as his car and its Maryland plates backed into a parking space and an unknown man walked inside. Marshals could see people inside the apartment peeking out through the blinds at them as they prepared to rush in. A woman emerged and said Anderson wasn't inside. But within moments, the 25-year-old man Baltimore police had dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" appeared with his hands up. After Anderson emerged, with his distinctive dreadlocks and forehead tattoos, police say they found a .40-caliber Glock and two bulletproof vests inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 22, 1991
Sonic YouthWhen: Wednesday, Feb. 27, 8 p.m.Where: Capital CentreTickets: $22.50Call: 481-6000 for tickets, 792-7490 for informationIn theory, at least, Sonic Youth has quite a lot in common with Neil Young. Both are beloved by rock critics. Both operate on the fringes of mainstream rock. And both like to crank their guitar amps as high as they'll go.But one thing these two bands don't have in common is an audience. Which is why, as the Youth open for Young in arena after arena, the group keeps getting the same reaction.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 1, 1991
Some rap records make you dance, and some make you think. But the best ones do both.That point may seem almost too obvious to bother making, but it's an important consideration when reviewing an album like Public Enemy's new "Apocalypse 91: The Enemy Strikes Black" (Def Jam/Columbia 47374, arriving in record stores today). Because as tempting as it is to praise P.E. for its point of view, which this time focuses on everything from malt liquor sales to slavery, what the group has to say doesn't matter quite as much as how it sounds.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
As area police continue the manhunt for the twice-charged murder suspect they have dubbed "public enemy No. 1," Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts personally hit the streets over the weekend. Batts said that he and his executive protection officers went out looking for 25-year-old Darryl Anderson, "checking four to five places my guys researched" and some vacant homes where they thought he could be hiding. They searched without fanfare, but Batts confirmed the outing on Tuesday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
As Tyrone Brown sat in his jail cell at the Baltimore County Detention Center late last year, awaiting trial for the murder of a man in a Towson Town Center parking garage, he kept busy in part by smoking marijuana and memorizing contraband writings of the Black Guerrilla Family - the same gang prosecutors say he killed to become a part of. Meanwhile, Frank Williams, who helped Brown plot the 2011 mall attack and was arrested with a group of...
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