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NEWS
June 14, 2014
I have been reading with much interest the letters to the editor regarding the MarylandCAN organization ( "Misunderstanding charter schools," June 8). Some parents blasted it and a member of the other side defended it. However, in my mind, the most interesting part of the debate was when letter writer Dave Ross wrote "throwing around buzzwords that to some have a negative connotation like 'pro-corporate,' 'hedge fund' and 'pro-privatization' not only is misleading but it is unhelpful in facilitating a productive discussion about how to improve the public education landscape for Baltimore City children.
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NEWS
September 1, 2014
Students go back to school for the first time Tuesday in only one school system in Maryland. That would be Worcester County, home of Ocean City where the lure of sun, sand - and the availability of teen labor - convinced the local school board to rewrite the academic calendar for the 2014-2015 year. Elsewhere, public school systems opened last week, and they appear universally satisfied with their choice. That 23 of Maryland's 24 school systems continue to prefer a pre-Labor Day starting date would seem to present a teachable moment to everyone but Comptroller Peter Franchot, who continues his quixotic crusade to force a longer summer break.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 8, 2013
Generally speaking, the general public should be a lot more interested in the formulation of a budget for the school system than attendance at public hearings on the subject would seem to indicate. From a philosophical standpoint, public education is a foundation of representative democracy. The populace cannot be expected to make informed decisions about public policy unless everyone has a baseline of general knowledge that includes the ability to read, write, do basic math, understand scientific principles and have a sense of history.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
California Gov. Jerry Brown has done a lot to finally balance his state's budget, but his greatest challenge still lies ahead ("Jerry Brown: A survivor at the top of his game," Feb. 3). In 1978, during Mr. Brown's first term as governor, he helped pass Proposition 13, a property tax cap that has mostly benefited large corporations at the expense of California's once elite education system. Since the passage of Proposition 13, California schools have gone from the best in the country to 49th in education spending.
NEWS
By ROBERT C. EMBRY, Jr | December 6, 1994
Before the recent election, I was approached by an educated and concerned friend of above average income who said he was going to vote for the Republican candidates.I acknowledged that Republicans on occasion have what I believe to be the preferable position on issues facing our state and country, but wondered what had motivated his decision. The reply was that he was fed up with government waste and high taxes.I asked him what waste did he have in mind. The response was, ''Let's start with all the money wasted on public schools in the city.
NEWS
By Libby Sternberg | October 6, 1997
IN 1839, an angry crowd attacked a Baltimore Carmelite convent for three days.They had been roused to action by the preaching and publications of Robert Breckenridge and Andrew B. Cross, both virulent anti-Catholics whose writings on the topic read like hysterical conspiracy theories and outlandish fantasies.While anti-Catholicism, like racism and anti-Semitism, is a well-known part of this country's history, less is known about how such bigoted views were tied to the enactment of laws that affect every American today.
TOPIC
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
AFTER A tongue-lashing from a state legislator upset about the quality of the schools, Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston stumbled shell-shocked out of the lawmaker's Annapolis office and took a deep breath. "You think a superintendent's job is easy?" Hairston grimaced. It most certainly is not, and he isn't the only local superintendent feeling the heat. Prince George's County schools chief Iris T. Metts announced recently that she would not ask the school board to renew her contract.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
THIS MONTH marks the 200th birthday of Horace Mann, who will be recognized by a few old-timers as the father of the public school.Mann's mission in the mid-19th century was to establish a common school in every community in the United States. He succeeded, but were he around to celebrate his bicentennial, he might laugh one minute and cry the next.On the one hand, public schools serve 90 percent of Americans enrolled in schools, certainly a record to be proud of. On the other hand, Mann's "invention" is under attack at every turn.
NEWS
March 22, 2009
The economic downturn squeezing public education funding in Maryland has had a similar effect on the state's private and parochial schools, whose ability to help needy students with tuition costs has fallen victim to depressed endowments and a precipitous drop in private donations. In the Baltimore Archdiocese, for example, where Catholic schools serve more than 33,000 students, enrollments declined by 5 percent in 2008 - twice the rate of the previous five years. Officials say job losses have left many parents unable to afford annual tuition.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Marylanders planning to travel to Ocean City for the Labor Day holiday need to be aware of the potential for dangerous rip currents because of tropical storm Cristobal, which continues to churn far out in the Atlantic. So far this summer Ocean City has seen a number of deaths related to rip currents, including an 18-year-old from Virginia who drowned Tuesday, leading town officials to post swimming restrictions that could last into the weekend. In an interview in July, Capt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
NEWS
June 14, 2014
I have been reading with much interest the letters to the editor regarding the MarylandCAN organization ( "Misunderstanding charter schools," June 8). Some parents blasted it and a member of the other side defended it. However, in my mind, the most interesting part of the debate was when letter writer Dave Ross wrote "throwing around buzzwords that to some have a negative connotation like 'pro-corporate,' 'hedge fund' and 'pro-privatization' not only is misleading but it is unhelpful in facilitating a productive discussion about how to improve the public education landscape for Baltimore City children.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
A strong public school system is important, and I support politicians who believe and vote that way. That's why I am glad The Sun endorsed state Sen. Brian Frosh for Maryland attorney general ( "Frosh for attorney general," June 8). Senator Frosh went to Maryland public schools, as do his children. Throughout his 27-year legislative career, support for public education in Maryland has been one of his top priorities. Specifically, he worked to reduce tuition costs at Maryland's public colleges and universities.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Editor: During County Executive Craig's final State of the County Address, he extolled the accomplishments of his administration. Most notable among these were many construction projects, including a new sheriff's office, emergency operations center, new schools, etc. Presumably, Mr. Craig believes that these edifices alone fulfill his commitment to public safety and education. While Mr. Craig's commitment to development and construction cannot be questioned, his commitment to both public safety and education are suspect.
NEWS
By Laura Gamble, Josh Fidler and Tom Wilcox | February 12, 2014
Business leaders are investing in education in Baltimore, and not just out of charity or to "give back. " While both are worthy purposes, our business leaders recognize the bottom line value in a growing and diverse Baltimore economy. Investment in education will make that a reality. Various levels of government are reciprocating, and the legislative session and upcoming gubernatorial race offer a perfect time to take that work to the next level. These leaders are investing in public education because they need an educated workforce, because they want good schools that will help the city retain the many young adults who want to continue their urban lifestyle here when they start families, and because education is the best route out of poverty for our underserved youth.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
A NUN with a long history of involvement in private religious education takes over this week as the new executive director of one of Baltimore's primary advocates for public education, the Fund for Educational Excellence.Sister Rosemarie T. Nassif, SSND, who resigned last summer after four sometimes stormy years as president of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, thinks her career move is perfectly logical. "I'm an advocate of education, public and private," says Nassif, 55. "I've seen how education transforms people.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
Students go back to school for the first time Tuesday in only one school system in Maryland. That would be Worcester County, home of Ocean City where the lure of sun, sand - and the availability of teen labor - convinced the local school board to rewrite the academic calendar for the 2014-2015 year. Elsewhere, public school systems opened last week, and they appear universally satisfied with their choice. That 23 of Maryland's 24 school systems continue to prefer a pre-Labor Day starting date would seem to present a teachable moment to everyone but Comptroller Peter Franchot, who continues his quixotic crusade to force a longer summer break.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
I have been following the Horizon Foundation's HoCo Unsweetened initiative since its inception. As a parent and teacher, I see daily evidence of how sugary drinks affect children and adults. I have serious reservations about high fructose corn syrup, a staple in these highly advertised beverages. I applaud the Horizon Foundation's willingness to stand up to "Big Soda" and champion our kids. All summer long, I have been following HoCo Unsweetened through social media as they dispatched road teams to many outdoor venues to educate parents and children about better beverages.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Since the views of Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler and the other candidates for governor on closing the achievement gap ("Gansler calls for all-day preschool," Oct. 1) were discussed in your newspaper without presenting mine, I think it's only fair to let your readers know about my proposals on the topic also. As someone who has been a teacher for almost 40 years, I find Mr. Gansler's ideas to be off the mark. Here are some educational principles: Anyone who knows anything about education knows that the first seven years of a child's life are the critical years in the development of the child's personality.
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