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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Five years ago on a summer day in the East Room of the White House, then-President Bill Clinton and Tony Blair - the British prime minister weighing in by satellite - hailed the mapping of the human genome as "the first great technological triumph of the 21st century." It was an achievement that many said would one day lead to eradication of disease and the creation of made-to-order, individualized drugs. On each side of the president were the beaming victors, ready to reap the spoils: a brash, but brilliant scientist named J. Craig Venter, then president of Celera Genomics Group of Rockville, and the accomplished Francis S. Collins, head of the Human Genome Project, an international consortium of academic laboratories led by the National Institutes of Health.
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NEWS
June 21, 2012
I can not agree more regarding Herman Belz opinion on Frank Gehry's design for theDwight D. EisenhowerMemorial ("Unworthy of Ike," June 11). Mr. Gehry's awareness is slight and lacks aesthetic depth. Certain character fundamentals of President Eisenhower's life should capture our imagination and the memory in principle. A structure, sculpture or monument in the public domain becomes a record of the person we knew in life, his accomplishment and legacy. The emphasis here should be his movement of energy, mass and miracle, bravado and willingness in the face of a better tomorrow for mankind.
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NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Without the National Archives' new "Wikipedian in residence," the only way anyone would be able to see Ansel Adams' collection of 220 photos would be to visit the archives in person. But now, thanks to a new partnership between the archives and Wikipedia, the entire collection can easily be viewed on Wikimedia Commons, part of an effort to make information housed at the nation's repository more easily accessible. Dominic McDevitt-Parks bears the title Wikipedian in residence, and it's his job to organize and publicize collections — even ones already online but sometimes all but hidden on the official archives website — from his cubicle at an archives' office near the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Without the National Archives' new "Wikipedian in residence," the only way anyone would be able to see Ansel Adams' collection of 220 photos would be to visit the archives in person. But now, thanks to a new partnership between the archives and Wikipedia, the entire collection can easily be viewed on Wikimedia Commons, part of an effort to make information housed at the nation's repository more easily accessible. Dominic McDevitt-Parks bears the title Wikipedian in residence, and it's his job to organize and publicize collections — even ones already online but sometimes all but hidden on the official archives website — from his cubicle at an archives' office near the University of Maryland, College Park.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 1, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that the familiar Oscar statuette that universally symbolizes the Academy Awards is protected by federal copyright laws, striking down an earlier decision that the Oscar had entered the public domain.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | August 31, 2006
Just in time for the start of a new school year, the popular Google search service is making available thousands of classic books free. For now, the Google Book Search service offers full downloads only of "public domain" books, whose copyrights have expired. These include many of the most famous titles of all time, such as the writings of Dickens, Shakespeare and Dante. It's the latest milestone in Google's campaign to do for books what it has done for Web sites. "Our goal is to create a comprehensive, full-text index of all the world's books," said Google Book Search group business product manager Adam Smith.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Director Francis Ford Coppola wants to make it quite clear that his Dracula movie is unlike any other Dracula movie. He's calling it "Bram Stoker's Dracula," and claims it is the only film version that offers the complete story from the 1897 Stoker novel of the vampire count, which has been made into scores of movies through the years.Coppola's film, which is finishing up shooting on the Columbia lot, stars Gary Oldman as Count Dracula, Winona Ryder as Mina and Anthony Hopkins as Van Helsing in a particularly erotic telling of the Dracula legend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [LAKAIIA WILLIAMS] | January 11, 2007
What's the point? -- We live in a world that is dominated by computers. You can do just about anything on your PC, from ordering groceries to blogging. So it was only a matter of time before someone realized the need to bring the library out of its traditional setting and place it on the Net. What to look for --You can access thousands of books -- all old enough to be in the public domain -- from some of the world's most notable authors, including William Shakespeare, Louisa May Alcott and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
I can not agree more regarding Herman Belz opinion on Frank Gehry's design for theDwight D. EisenhowerMemorial ("Unworthy of Ike," June 11). Mr. Gehry's awareness is slight and lacks aesthetic depth. Certain character fundamentals of President Eisenhower's life should capture our imagination and the memory in principle. A structure, sculpture or monument in the public domain becomes a record of the person we knew in life, his accomplishment and legacy. The emphasis here should be his movement of energy, mass and miracle, bravado and willingness in the face of a better tomorrow for mankind.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 30, 1991
Washington -- THERE ARE TWO legitimate questions to be raised about the personal life of Sen. Charles S. Robb. The first is whether, while serving as governor of Virginia more than seven years ago, he observed cocaine being used at a party he attended. The second is whether Robb's associates have threatened potential witnesses to damaging personal conduct on his part.If the answer to either of these questions is affirmative, Robb may be vulnerable to charges he broke the law. But so far neither has been answered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [LAKAIIA WILLIAMS] | January 11, 2007
What's the point? -- We live in a world that is dominated by computers. You can do just about anything on your PC, from ordering groceries to blogging. So it was only a matter of time before someone realized the need to bring the library out of its traditional setting and place it on the Net. What to look for --You can access thousands of books -- all old enough to be in the public domain -- from some of the world's most notable authors, including William Shakespeare, Louisa May Alcott and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | August 31, 2006
Just in time for the start of a new school year, the popular Google search service is making available thousands of classic books free. For now, the Google Book Search service offers full downloads only of "public domain" books, whose copyrights have expired. These include many of the most famous titles of all time, such as the writings of Dickens, Shakespeare and Dante. It's the latest milestone in Google's campaign to do for books what it has done for Web sites. "Our goal is to create a comprehensive, full-text index of all the world's books," said Google Book Search group business product manager Adam Smith.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Five years ago on a summer day in the East Room of the White House, then-President Bill Clinton and Tony Blair - the British prime minister weighing in by satellite - hailed the mapping of the human genome as "the first great technological triumph of the 21st century." It was an achievement that many said would one day lead to eradication of disease and the creation of made-to-order, individualized drugs. On each side of the president were the beaming victors, ready to reap the spoils: a brash, but brilliant scientist named J. Craig Venter, then president of Celera Genomics Group of Rockville, and the accomplished Francis S. Collins, head of the Human Genome Project, an international consortium of academic laboratories led by the National Institutes of Health.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - As a child growing up in Southern California, Tiger Woods played on public courses with threadbare tee boxes, patchy fairways and sandy greens. He didn't see the inside of a country club until he was a teen-ager. Those memories came back to Woods all week here at Bethpage State Park, where the 102nd U.S. Open was contested on a public facility for the first time in its history. The Black Course didn't evoke the same kinds of thoughts for Woods as those municipals he played back home.
NEWS
March 18, 2000
DECIPHERING the human genetic code, identifying and sequencing more than 100,000 genes that determine the body's development, is a formidable, complex task. So too is the legal challenge to determine what is proprietary information that can be patented by gene research companies, and what genetic information should be public property. In the balance is the discovery and treatment of myriad diseases and genetic disorders, a scientific breakthrough of unthinkable magnitude. Four years ago, the leading industrial nations agreed to an informal program of complete, continuous release of information gathered by the international Human Genome Project.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Director Francis Ford Coppola wants to make it quite clear that his Dracula movie is unlike any other Dracula movie. He's calling it "Bram Stoker's Dracula," and claims it is the only film version that offers the complete story from the 1897 Stoker novel of the vampire count, which has been made into scores of movies through the years.Coppola's film, which is finishing up shooting on the Columbia lot, stars Gary Oldman as Count Dracula, Winona Ryder as Mina and Anthony Hopkins as Van Helsing in a particularly erotic telling of the Dracula legend.
NEWS
March 18, 2000
DECIPHERING the human genetic code, identifying and sequencing more than 100,000 genes that determine the body's development, is a formidable, complex task. So too is the legal challenge to determine what is proprietary information that can be patented by gene research companies, and what genetic information should be public property. In the balance is the discovery and treatment of myriad diseases and genetic disorders, a scientific breakthrough of unthinkable magnitude. Four years ago, the leading industrial nations agreed to an informal program of complete, continuous release of information gathered by the international Human Genome Project.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - As a child growing up in Southern California, Tiger Woods played on public courses with threadbare tee boxes, patchy fairways and sandy greens. He didn't see the inside of a country club until he was a teen-ager. Those memories came back to Woods all week here at Bethpage State Park, where the 102nd U.S. Open was contested on a public facility for the first time in its history. The Black Course didn't evoke the same kinds of thoughts for Woods as those municipals he played back home.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 1, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that the familiar Oscar statuette that universally symbolizes the Academy Awards is protected by federal copyright laws, striking down an earlier decision that the Oscar had entered the public domain.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 30, 1991
Washington -- THERE ARE TWO legitimate questions to be raised about the personal life of Sen. Charles S. Robb. The first is whether, while serving as governor of Virginia more than seven years ago, he observed cocaine being used at a party he attended. The second is whether Robb's associates have threatened potential witnesses to damaging personal conduct on his part.If the answer to either of these questions is affirmative, Robb may be vulnerable to charges he broke the law. But so far neither has been answered.
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