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NEWS
December 7, 1995
DONALD I. DELL believes that he and his fellow Carroll commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" regarding the proposed purchase of the former Telemecanique plant for use as county school board headquarters.Mr. Dell frames the issue perfectly -- even though he's on the wrong side of it. Indeed, the commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" by not closing this deal until there is a thorough public discussion of the pollution problems at the former industrial site.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
During a weekend gathering of black alumni from the University of Maryland Law School in which the continuing inequalities faced by African-Americans was discussed, one participant called for Baltimore to preserve the city's tradition of public pools. UM law professor Taunya Lovell Banks presented Saturday new work on the civil rights history of swimming in Baltimore and questioned whether Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is doing enough to keep the pools open and available. "Like mayors before her, when it's time to do budget cuts, the first think they look at are parks," said Banks.
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NEWS
By Howard Bluth | May 30, 1991
THE DECLINE of public space is often cited as a major reason for political apathy in America. The public square, once a gathering place for political debate, has been abandoned for the private mall, where consumerism reigns supreme and politics is strictly taboo.But the loss of public space is only part of the problem. Democracy also suffers from a loss of public time, that is, time the mass media devote to keeping the public informed.An obvious case in point is the recent savings and loan scandal.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Baltimore's ethics board closed its monthly meeting Thursday without discussing publicly its probe into Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's use of free 1st Mariner Arena tickets. After discussing other matters publicly, the board voted to meet in closed session. Afterward, several board members and its director, Avery Aisenstark, a city employee, would not answer questions about what was discussed. "We're not authorized to discuss the reason for or topic of the closed meeting - let alone why something was or was not discussed," Aisenstark said in an email.
NEWS
December 5, 1998
REGARDLESS OF what a staff analysis of their expense accounts shows, the outgoing commissioners in Carroll County should not attempt a last-minute change in their compensation formula. The three men should leave it to the new board that takes office Monday.This matter of executive-legislative pay deserves deliberate consideration and public discussion -- not the government equivalent of battlefield surgery. There's no reason for a scramble to charge the $12 per diem the commissioners collect for each work day.A hasty 11th-hour vote today would be the kind of lame-duck, underhanded action that landed the commissioners in trouble two weeks ago, when they unabashedly raised the per diem a whopping 650 percent.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 15, 2011
The Bush River Community Council will host a public discussion on the master plan for the Bush River communities of Abingdon, Belcamp, Long Bar Harbor, Otter Creek, Perryman and HollyWoods on Monday, Dec. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Anita Leight Estuary Center, 700 Otter Point Road in Abingdon. In October, the Harford County Department of Planning and Zoning released an update to the master plan specifically designed for the areas surrounding the Bush River. This plan will be the guideline for how the county foresees development in the Bush River community for the next 10 years.
NEWS
September 7, 1994
The charade that took place at a recent meeting of the planning commission in Hampstead is a clear indication of the disproportionate say developers have in government decisions in the county.Beset with an inadequate supply of water, overcrowded schools and congested roads, Hampstead's town council, by a 4-1 vote, approved a letter asking the planning commission to impose a 90-day building moratorium. The temporary freeze would allow the council time to study whether adequate infrastructure exists to support the residential development now wending its way through the permit process.
NEWS
August 8, 1991
If there ever is a hall of fame for public officials whose comments patronize the public, we have a nominee -- Benjamin L. Brown, chairman of the Governor's Redistricting Advisory Committee.He closed the panel's first work session to the public last week, calling the decision "in the best interests of the citizens." In the future, the public can expect the group to make "certain decisions" privately, he said. "It's not in our best interest and the interest of the public to have it thrashed out in the media on a day-in-day-out basis."
NEWS
March 21, 1995
The release of nerve gas at 16 Tokyo subway stations during the Monday morning rush hour could only have been terrorism by a group of people including at least one skilled organic chemist to handle the material.Like the bombing of the New York World Trade Center in February 1993, it turns the greatness of a city into its vulnerability. The denser the development, the greater the inter-dependence of people, the higher the reliance on a universal minimum standard of civility. There may be no other urban rail transit system that is both as large and as efficient.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
MORE THAN 300 people gathered one night last week to listen to the first formal presentation of what the successor to Rouse Co. has in mind for the future of downtown Columbia. It was the largest such public meeting in memory, and General Growth Properties Inc. of Chicago - which in purchasing Rouse acquired a big share of the planned city's core - put on a convincing show. In the past, we've been skeptical of General Growth's intentions in building out and remaking downtown Columbia - and Howard County still very much needs to be deeply involved in shaping the final plans - but last week the Chicago firm pushed many of the right buttons with its vision for turning Columbia's mall-centric town center into a much more viable "city in a park."
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 15, 2011
The Bush River Community Council will host a public discussion on the master plan for the Bush River communities of Abingdon, Belcamp, Long Bar Harbor, Otter Creek, Perryman and HollyWoods on Monday, Dec. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Anita Leight Estuary Center, 700 Otter Point Road in Abingdon. In October, the Harford County Department of Planning and Zoning released an update to the master plan specifically designed for the areas surrounding the Bush River. This plan will be the guideline for how the county foresees development in the Bush River community for the next 10 years.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
When he signed a six-year, $66.1 million extension 15 months ago, Orioles outfielder Nick Markakis was convinced that the organization was headed in the right direction and that he wanted to be a part of it. But with the Orioles saddled with an 18-48 record and on pace for one of the worst seasons in franchise and baseball history, the normally mild-mannered Markakis publicly expressed his frustration with the organization for the first time, questioning...
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Justin Fenton and Steven Stanek and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporters | June 25, 2008
The deputy director of Anne Arundel County's agency for job training and placement filed a complaint yesterday with the state office of civil rights, alleging racial and sexual discrimination by the county government. Rene C. Swafford, whose position with the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp. was apparently about to be eliminated, said in a news release that complaints were also filed with the U.S. Department of Labor and Maryland Human Relations Commission. The attorney general's office confirmed that its civil rights office received a complaint from her yesterday morning.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
A man charged with killing five mostly elderly people since 1999 was ordered held without bail yesterday while, hours later, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge issued a ruling prohibiting prosecutors from making public comments in the high-profile case. Richard Woods, the public defender for Raymont Hopewell, said a gag order was necessary to preserve his client's right to an impartial city jury. The case has generated intense media attention because of the age of the victims and the nature of the crimes.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
MORE THAN 300 people gathered one night last week to listen to the first formal presentation of what the successor to Rouse Co. has in mind for the future of downtown Columbia. It was the largest such public meeting in memory, and General Growth Properties Inc. of Chicago - which in purchasing Rouse acquired a big share of the planned city's core - put on a convincing show. In the past, we've been skeptical of General Growth's intentions in building out and remaking downtown Columbia - and Howard County still very much needs to be deeply involved in shaping the final plans - but last week the Chicago firm pushed many of the right buttons with its vision for turning Columbia's mall-centric town center into a much more viable "city in a park."
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 17, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will hold a public round table discussion from 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday at Fullerton Elementary School. Smith and county panelists plan to discuss positive features and directions for change in the Fullerton and Overlea communities. The public is encouraged to attend and bring questions to the event. The Fullerton meeting is the eighth in a series of Baltimore County round tables put on by Smith. Fullerton Elementary School is located at 4400 Fullerton Ave. Originally published 9:28 AM EDT
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 28, 1995
When it comes to news and documentaries, television is supposed to be long on visuals and short on context.But context -- wide, deep and occasionally even wise -- is exactly what television is offering this week as we approach the 20th anniversary of one of America's more shameful moments, the fall of Saigon, which brought the Vietnam War to an end in 1975.CBS News Correspondent Bob Simon has been in Vietnam this week delivering splendid reports, which will conclude tonight during the "CBS Evening News With Dan Rather & Connie Chung" airing at 7 on WJZ (Channel 13)
NEWS
By JAY ROSEN | April 7, 1991
Scared out of their wits by the political disaster in store for them, Democrats in Congress are praying for an issue, any issue, that can deflect attention from the party's reluctance to vote for war two months ago. Meanwhile, Republicans are readying their assaults for 1992. What's sure to be damaged, though, is democracy, not Democrats.For one weekend in January, when Congress was considering its war resolution,the nation could watch and listen as its representatives deliberated on a vital and current question.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
The Columbia Association board of directors is trying to shed its reputation for bickering, but only weeks after village elections the group is arguing about guidelines limiting public speech. After an annual legal briefing with lawyers from Whiteford, Taylor and Preston, the directors cannot agree on whether they were advised to - or should - withhold publicly expressing their views on an issue before the board discusses it. The disagreement comes after the elections produced a new board majority that favors more openness from the 10-member group, which also acts as the Columbia Council.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
The state's plan to close Crownsville Hospital Center met its first criticism yesterday, as employee union leaders and the mother of a patient at the 90-year-old mental health facility told legislators that a shutdown would put patients at risk and save much less than officials expect. "It creates holes in an already shredded safety net," said Paul J. Gentile, president of the American Federation of Teachers Healthcare-Maryland, which represents nurses and other employees at the hospital.
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