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NEWS
December 7, 1994
All too often, the theory of an open judicial system is tested by individuals seeking to draw a dark curtain around court proceedings for their own advantage. Closed hearings, sealed records, anonymous plaintiffs are among the ways in which the public is denied access to legal proceedings.These maneuvers may well violate the First Amendment and the Fourteenth Amendment, as Harford County Circuit Judge William Carr noted in a recent ruling that refused legal anonymity to two women who claim they contracted infectious genital herpes from ex-boyfriends.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
The Baltimore Police Department said it will not release policies and procedures related to training exercises, even after being told by a federal judge last week that its policies are not protected from public disclosure. In response to a request from The Baltimore Sun, the department agreed that its standard operating procedures were public information. But its chief legal counsel concluded that they would not release the policies because of an internal investigation into whether any were violated during this week's shooting of a trainee at a state facility in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Congress sent President Bush yesterday a bill aimed at reining in the influence of special interests, completing a long-debated overhaul of ethics and lobbying rules spurred by scandals that have rocked Capitol Hill. The measure grew out of a pledge by Democrats to "drain the swamp" after they won majorities in both congressional chambers in last fall's elections. It passed the Senate yesterday, 83-14. The House approved it Tuesday, 411-8. The legislation would ban gifts paid for by lobbyists, limit privately funded travel and double to two years the time senators must wait after leaving Capitol Hill before they can lobby their former colleagues.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A secret federal court has ordered the Bush administration to respond to a request from a civil liberties group, which asked the court to make public its rulings that approved the National Security Agency's controversial "Terrorist Surveillance Program." The order was announced yesterday by the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed the request earlier this month. "This is an unprecedented request that warrants further briefing," wrote Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, the presiding judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most cancer patients participating in studies of new treatments don't care whether their doctors or hospitals have financial ties to companies whose drugs are being tested, according to a government-sponsored study published today. About 80 percent of patients surveyed by researchers for the National Institutes of Health said they were "not worried at all" by the ties and said they would still take part in the drug trials if their doctor or hospital owned stock or received royalties from the corporate sponsor.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
The Baltimore Police Department said it will not release policies and procedures related to training exercises, even after being told by a federal judge last week that its policies are not protected from public disclosure. In response to a request from The Baltimore Sun, the department agreed that its standard operating procedures were public information. But its chief legal counsel concluded that they would not release the policies because of an internal investigation into whether any were violated during this week's shooting of a trainee at a state facility in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 17, 2003
In a fiery resignation note, former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating insisted yesterday that his comparison of secretive Roman Catholic bishops to the Mafia was "deadly accurate," even, as expected, he bowed to pressure to step down as chief of a U.S. bishop watchdog panel on sexual abuse. "I make no apology," Keating wrote in a short letter to Bishop Wilton Gregory of Belleville, Ill., president of the U.S. bishops, who had selected him to lead a newly created oversight group last June. "To resist grand jury subpoenas, to suppress the names of offending clerics, to deny, to obfuscate, to explain away: that is the model of a criminal organization, not my church."
NEWS
January 26, 1998
PUBLIC MONEY. PUBLIC TRUST. Public solicitation. There should be no question that public accountability is required under these conditions. Not just a "good faith" declaration of probity, but a certified audit of the books.So it is dismaying to see the resistance of some Carroll County volunteer fire companies to public disclosure of their financial statements. Especially when the county government is paying nearly $100,000 to conduct that audit.A legal technicality is raised as an excuse: Fire companies are privately chartered organizations.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 15, 1998
MARYLAND STATE lawmakers are in a funk. Who can blame them? Two top leaders have been ensnarled in ethics scandals -- one has been expelled, the other may be pressed to resign.Other lawmakers could face embarrassing questions about their own intermingling of public and private jobs.Legislators have only themselves to blame. Rules of conduct are so flexible that tough enforcement is impossible. Peer pressure is supposed to keep senators and delegates on the straight and narrow. It hasn't worked.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A secret federal court has ordered the Bush administration to respond to a request from a civil liberties group, which asked the court to make public its rulings that approved the National Security Agency's controversial "Terrorist Surveillance Program." The order was announced yesterday by the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed the request earlier this month. "This is an unprecedented request that warrants further briefing," wrote Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, the presiding judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Congress sent President Bush yesterday a bill aimed at reining in the influence of special interests, completing a long-debated overhaul of ethics and lobbying rules spurred by scandals that have rocked Capitol Hill. The measure grew out of a pledge by Democrats to "drain the swamp" after they won majorities in both congressional chambers in last fall's elections. It passed the Senate yesterday, 83-14. The House approved it Tuesday, 411-8. The legislation would ban gifts paid for by lobbyists, limit privately funded travel and double to two years the time senators must wait after leaving Capitol Hill before they can lobby their former colleagues.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2007
Baltimore could become the first big city to publicize names, photographs and home addresses of people who are convicted of shootings or other gun-related crimes, the latest twist on a national crime prevention trend of exposing names of certain types of criminals. Legislation that Mayor Sheila Dixon introduced in the City Council last week would direct the Police Department to create a database for gun offenders that is similar to the existing online statewide sex offender list.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most cancer patients participating in studies of new treatments don't care whether their doctors or hospitals have financial ties to companies whose drugs are being tested, according to a government-sponsored study published today. About 80 percent of patients surveyed by researchers for the National Institutes of Health said they were "not worried at all" by the ties and said they would still take part in the drug trials if their doctor or hospital owned stock or received royalties from the corporate sponsor.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 17, 2003
In a fiery resignation note, former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating insisted yesterday that his comparison of secretive Roman Catholic bishops to the Mafia was "deadly accurate," even, as expected, he bowed to pressure to step down as chief of a U.S. bishop watchdog panel on sexual abuse. "I make no apology," Keating wrote in a short letter to Bishop Wilton Gregory of Belleville, Ill., president of the U.S. bishops, who had selected him to lead a newly created oversight group last June. "To resist grand jury subpoenas, to suppress the names of offending clerics, to deny, to obfuscate, to explain away: that is the model of a criminal organization, not my church."
BUSINESS
By Beth Healy and Beth Healy,BOSTON GLOBE | October 27, 2002
As the debate intensifies over public disclosure of venture capital returns, two opposing camps are forming. There are venture capitalists who want to slam the door on the matter entirely. And there are others who are willing to discuss the notion of better "transparency" in the venture business - including the possibility of creating a system under which venture returns could be fairly and accurately reported and compared. There's a long way to go before any truce is reached. Tom Crotty, a general partner at Battery Ventures in Wellesley, Mass.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Snide jokes about the boss. Cartoons containing ethnic slurs. Sexually explicit messages. Across the state, Maryland's municipalities are scrambling to let workers know their every keystroke could be monitored as the computer police nose around inboxes and peek at electronic files in search of offensive e-mail messages. "It's a public trust issue," said Steven D. Powell, director of management and budget for Carroll County. "When you're using equipment that belongs to the taxpayers, you have to be mindful that everything you do is subject to public scrutiny."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2007
Baltimore could become the first big city to publicize names, photographs and home addresses of people who are convicted of shootings or other gun-related crimes, the latest twist on a national crime prevention trend of exposing names of certain types of criminals. Legislation that Mayor Sheila Dixon introduced in the City Council last week would direct the Police Department to create a database for gun offenders that is similar to the existing online statewide sex offender list.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Snide jokes about the boss. Cartoons containing ethnic slurs. Sexually explicit messages. Across the state, Maryland's municipalities are scrambling to let workers know their every keystroke could be monitored as the computer police nose around inboxes and peek at electronic files in search of offensive e-mail messages. "It's a public trust issue," said Steven D. Powell, director of management and budget for Carroll County. "When you're using equipment that belongs to the taxpayers, you have to be mindful that everything you do is subject to public scrutiny."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
The head of the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund has issued an edict to the agency's employees, warning them that they could face criminal penalties if they make unauthorized disclosures to the press or public.Paul M. Rose, president of the agency, issued the order last week after a series of articles critical of the agency were published recently in The Sun. The stories, which Rose noted in his memo, quoted from internal IWIF documents, including the minutes of IWIF governing board executive sessions and inspection reports for IWIF owned and leased vehicles.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 15, 1998
MARYLAND STATE lawmakers are in a funk. Who can blame them? Two top leaders have been ensnarled in ethics scandals -- one has been expelled, the other may be pressed to resign.Other lawmakers could face embarrassing questions about their own intermingling of public and private jobs.Legislators have only themselves to blame. Rules of conduct are so flexible that tough enforcement is impossible. Peer pressure is supposed to keep senators and delegates on the straight and narrow. It hasn't worked.
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