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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Paul Joseph Feeley Sr., a former Baltimore County public defender and a Towson attorney died June 15 at St. Joseph Medical Center after suffering a fall at his Timonium home. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Fayette Street and on Guilford Avenue, he was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. He attended what is now Loyola University Maryland for two years and then joined the Army Air Forces during World War II. He spent most of his time in the service in Walla Walla, Wash., training as a bombardier, family members said.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A law professor who is teaching Maryland's public defenders to better serve their poor clients amid "crushing" caseloads is among the winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. As founder of the Atlanta-based organization Gideon's Promise, Jonathan Rapping works to train public defenders and help reform what he considers civil rights abuses in the criminal justice system. He arrived in Baltimore in May for a year-long stint at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, his first attempt at changing a statewide system.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Kirk R. Osborn, a career public defender who headed the city's misdemeanor jury trial unit, died of cancer Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Mayfield resident was 55. "I'm going to miss him," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams. "Kirk was a person I could always trust. He had a high level of integrity. He was a good man who took the time to get to know his clients. His death is a huge loss for those of us who work in the justice system. " Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said, "Kirk was a consummate professional and a real pleasure to work with, even though we were on different sides of the aisle.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
A new state audit says Maryland's public defender's office is failing to properly document whether its clients are poor enough to need its help. The periodic review by the state's Office of Legislative Audits, released Thursday, also found the office is struggling with cost overruns and heavy workloads for attorneys, and needs to do more to put resources where they are most needed. Those findings and questions about client screenings have been raised in previous audits. The state Office of the Public Defender provides legal representation to poor people charged with crimes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Gov. Martin O"Malley's $69.5 million supplemental budget, an update to the overall state budget that usually comes to the General Assembly late in its 90-day session, would add 85 positions in the Office of the Public Defender to deal with a Court of Appeals decision expanding the right to representation at bail review hearings -- putting the executive brance above its limit of full-time employees. To bring the state under the limit set by the legislature's Joint Committeee on Spending Affordability, legislative analysts are recommending that lawmakers require the governor to trim 77 positions from its payroll over the next budget year, which starts July 1. The spending affordability panel has set a goal of limiting the number of full-time positions to just over 79,000.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2012
Faced with a court decision that could cost tens of millions of dollars to pay for lawyers at bail hearings, the Senate and House of Delegates passed conflicting measures Thursday to limit the scope of the ruling — setting up a potential tussle between the chambers on which approach to take. The Senate bill, which passed 45-1, would give suspects held by police the right to be brought before a judge with a defense lawyer within 48 hours. The House bill, which passed 133-0, would not. It seeks only to make clear that defendants are not entitled to a lawyer until they appear before a judge when the court is next in session.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
A state oversight panel has hired a new Maryland public defender, four months after firing the previous agency head, who had refused to implement cutbacks and other organizational changes. Montgomery County Public Defender Paul B. DeWolfe, 61, was named as state public defender Tuesday morning, appointed by the three-member Board of Trustees. He will oversee a division with 1,000 employees, including 400 lawyers charged with representing Maryland's indigent defendants, which means - in these recessionary times - that his caseload grows as his budget shrinks.
NEWS
October 20, 1993
Assistant Public Defender W. Samuel Truette left the Carroll County office Monday to begin taking cases in Howard County.According to lawyers in the Carroll public defender's office, the decision to leave Carroll was Mr. Truette's.Mr. Truette, a one-time head of the Carroll County Narcotics Task Force, has been a public defender since 1990, when he left the Carroll State's Attorney's Office. In his tenure as a Carroll public defender, he represented many people who had been charged by the drug task force.
NEWS
February 1, 1994
A third public defender will take over the Howard Circuit Court case of a man accused of murdering his girlfriend at the Rocky Gorge Reservoir last spring.Daniel Shemer, director of training at the state Office of the Public Defender in Baltimore, will represent Marvin Philander Smith when his case goes to trial on May 4.Howard Public Defender Carol Hanson told court officials at a hearing yesterday that Mr. Shemer will handle the case. She said her office had to withdraw its representation of Mr. Smith because of a conflict of interest.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 29, 2004
FRUITLAND - The death of a Wicomico County public defender whose body was found Tuesday in his parked pickup truck has been ruled a suicide by the state medical examiner's office. An autopsy performed yesterday determined that Anthony T. Carozza, 40, died of multiple cut wounds to his wrists, complicated by hypothermia, according to Dr. Laron Locke of the medical examiner's office. Carozza, who lived in Salisbury's Coulborn Mill Village neighborhood, was found about 4 a.m. in the truck, which was parked beside a recreational complex in Fruitland.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Charles County authorities are investigating an incident in which a retired Circuit Court judge ordered that a unruly defendant be given an electric shock during a court proceeding last month. Paul B. DeWolfe Jr., who heads the state Office of the Public Defender, called Friday for the judge to be banned from hearing cases. "What the judge did here was unconscionable," DeWolfe said in a statement. "The infliction of physical pain to silence a person is unacceptable anywhere, but especially when it is done in a court of law at the direction of the very person whose job it is to protect people's rights.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
After a woman picked out a photo of Tyree Threatt and said he was the man who robbed her off Reisterstown Road a month and a half ago, Baltimore detectives quickly got a warrant for his arrest, and they hauled him down to Central Booking over the past weekend, where he was held in lieu of $75,000 bail. There was just one problem: Records show that the 21-year-old Baltimore man was jailed in another case at the time of the robbery. A public defender who represented Threatt this week says he laid out jail records before a judge Monday showing that his client had what might have been the best possible alibi.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore | February 24, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley appointed 23 people to fill judicial posts Monday, promoting a number of sitting judges and placing some prominent lawyers on the bench. Among the governor's five appointees to District Court in Baltimore are James Green, the head of government relations for Baltimore police, and David Brian Aldouby, a veteran public defender. He promoted three District Court judges to the city's Circuit Court, and also appointed two other lawyers to fill empty spots. The governor also named Julie Glass, a senior prosecutor in the city state's attorney's office, as one of three appointees to the Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
My son Ryan was arrested on Sept. 24 for entering an unlocked rear of a dwelling he thought was occupied by an elderly wheelchair-bound women for whom he ran errands, but he entered the wrong home after knocking on the front door for some time. He was trying to earn the last $5 or so of the $30 coming due for restitution on a prior case in which he admitted wrongdoing. My son was really trying to get his counseling and treatment in order and begin to become a good citizen until this happened.
NEWS
By Doug Colbert | December 7, 2013
Changing a pretrial justice system challenges every principal player to do things differently. That's the situation Maryland's elected officials, judges, prosecutors, public defenders and pretrial investigators face as they encounter the most monumental transition in pretrial justice since the Supreme Court recognized a poor person's constitutional right to counsel in 1963. This fall the Maryland Court of Appeals issued a constitutional mandate that promised a public defender to poor people when their liberty is first at stake.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 26, 2013
An Edgewood man was arrested last Friday after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend. Brent Moyd-Kane, 26, of the 1800 block of Edgewater Drive, is charged with first- and second-degree assault and resisting arrest in connection with the incident. Harford County Sheriff's deputies were called to his home last Friday and found Moyd-Kane's girlfriend lying by the door, crying. She told police she had jumped off the balcony of her apartment because she didn't know who was coming inside.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
For Marvin Philander Smith, maybe the fourth time will be the charm.The Baltimore man's first two public defenders withdrew from his murder case, he wants to fire the third one and hopes a judge will appoint a fourth lawyer to defend him.Mr. Smith, who has a high-school equivalency diploma, told Howard Circuit Court Judge Cornelius Sybert Jr. at a hearing earlier this week that he will handle his own case if he can't get a court-appointed private attorney.Mr. Smith, 37, complained to the judge that he doesn't believe his present attorney, Assistant Public Defender Daniel Shemer, is showing much interest in his case.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
A Baltimore teenager pleaded guilty to murder Monday as his trial was set to begin, following a failed attempt last week to have a confession withheld from jurors in the case. Markell Shelton Jones, 18, shot and killed Freddie Jones Jr. at the Yau Brothers Chinese carryout on Greenmount Avenue on Halloween 2011 during a bungled robbery attempt. The attack was captured on surveillance cameras and police released the footage to the press. After Markell Jones' family recognized him on television, his grandfather called police to have him taken into custody, according to testimony at a motions hearing last week.
NEWS
By Doug Colbert | April 15, 2013
While the nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of a poor person's constitutional right to a lawyer, Maryland legislators' support for House Bill 153 in the recently concluded General Assembly session threatened to return to the days when an accused person went without a public defender's representation. Without any fanfare or media attention, HB 153 quietly made its way through the House of Delegates. Then, it took just one proponent to convince the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee to approve a bill that prohibited a public defender from continuing to represent clients beyond a bail review hearing, upon the client's release from jail.
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