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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Facing opposition from some of the nation's governors to proposals for toughening air quality standards, the Environmental Protection Agency is moving to extend the period for public debate before the final rules are issued.Many state and local officials and major industries that oppose the proposed rules have been seeking a delay. The request is included in a resolution criticizing the proposals that the National Governors' Association will debate at its annual meeting in Washington this weekend.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013
Legendary Baltimore radio talk show host Ron Smith referred to our politicians as “public rulers.”  He refused to use their preferred term “public servants” because they rarely if ever act as servants, and if they did, it was most certainly not in the public's interests.  Smith was keenly aware that our politicians, national, state and local were a ruling class that invariably thinks they know better than the public they ostensibly serve....
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NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | February 20, 1994
Confusion makes bad policy, but is there room in public debate for principled uncertainty? Sometimes, being willing to live for a while without absolute answers to all our questions may be the best way to avoid confusion and the pitfalls it can lead to.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
By Kevin A. Dunne | August 8, 2012
As a result of my representation of a 10-year-old boy who was brutally mauled by a neighbor's pit bull, I have recently been thrust into a heated and, at times, toxic public debate concerning the dangerousness of certain breeds of dogs. This debate has been particularly frustrating because the two sides do not actually disagree about the important parts. If we as a society are interested in preventing serious injuries or death and adequately compensating victims, the dialogue has to change.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Legendary Baltimore radio talk show host Ron Smith referred to our politicians as “public rulers.”  He refused to use their preferred term “public servants” because they rarely if ever act as servants, and if they did, it was most certainly not in the public's interests.  Smith was keenly aware that our politicians, national, state and local were a ruling class that invariably thinks they know better than the public they ostensibly serve....
NEWS
March 15, 1996
RUTHANN ARON failed to persuade Maryland Republicans she was their best candidate for the U.S. Senate in 1994. Now, she has also failed to persuade a court that the winner of that primary, former Sen. Bill Brock, defamed her in the closing days of the campaign.The verdict is not just a victory for Mr. Brock, but also an endorsement of the need for vigorous, robust public debate, even if that debate occasionally skirts the line of propriety. The decision is consistent with a long line of legal precedents affirming the fact that limiting public debate can do more harm than good.
NEWS
October 28, 1990
Edward L. Blanton, the Republican candidate running for attorney general against the Democratic incumbent, J. Joseph Curran Jr., is a competent, respected lawyer and public-spirited citizen who has raised several legitimate questions about Mr. Curran's record in four years in office.Mr. Blanton says the attorney general has not mobilized his office to deal with violent crime. He says Mr. Curran has not pursued environmental lawbreakers. He says Mr. Curran has deferred to his assistants instead of being a leader.
NEWS
August 5, 1996
No wonder Dole is behind in the pollsThe recent bombings on TWA Flight 800 and in Centennial Olympic Park define the consequences and harsh reality of American independence.Bob Dole, amazingly, chose this moment in time to praise the patriotic values of the unreal movie, ''Independence Day,'' and its unreal portrayal of our national psyche.No wonder he is 24 points behind President Clinton in the polls.Mel TansillCatonsvilleWatchdog group harms public debateYour July 24 article addressing a study released by Public Citizen, a self-appointed ''consumer watchdog group," illustrates the pernicious effect that political correctness has on rational, objective public debate, particularly as it relates to technical and scientific issues.
NEWS
By JAY ROSEN | April 7, 1991
Scared out of their wits by the political disaster in store for them, Democrats in Congress are praying for an issue, any issue, that can deflect attention from the party's reluctance to vote for war two months ago. Meanwhile, Republicans are readying their assaults for 1992. What's sure to be damaged, though, is democracy, not Democrats.For one weekend in January, when Congress was considering its war resolution,the nation could watch and listen as its representatives deliberated on a vital and current question.
NEWS
By Kevin A. Dunne | August 8, 2012
As a result of my representation of a 10-year-old boy who was brutally mauled by a neighbor's pit bull, I have recently been thrust into a heated and, at times, toxic public debate concerning the dangerousness of certain breeds of dogs. This debate has been particularly frustrating because the two sides do not actually disagree about the important parts. If we as a society are interested in preventing serious injuries or death and adequately compensating victims, the dialogue has to change.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Public discussion of a proposal to close one city school and reorganize four others ended Saturday with little community disagreement, a marked change from past years that commissioners attributed to a better-timed process and greater trust between officials and the local communities. Facing closure in 2012 under the plan is the Institute of Business and Entrepreneurship High School near Hanlon Park, a school officials said has faced falling graduation rates and enrollments. Two other high schools and two elementary/middle schools would see substantial changes under the plan.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | June 1, 2008
New federal transportation rules scheduled to stop the Maryland Transit Administration's $10 bus rides to and from park-and-ride lots to Orioles games starting tomorrow are based on a philosophical argument made nationally by private bus companies that they should not have to compete for special-event business with publicly subsidized buses. Similar public transit service in the Washington area to events such as Redskins football games are to end next year, according to news reports. It's an argument that was debated in a different political context in Howard County eight years ago, when then-County Executive James N. Robey, a Democat who is now a state senator, proposed building a second publicly owned golf course on county-owned land in West Friendship, and former Republican County Councilman Allan H. Kittleman opposed it. Kittleman, now also a state senator, argued that since government courses, such as the county-built Timbers of Troy golf course in Elkridge, pay no taxes, they can unfairly compete with privately owned courses.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | October 4, 2006
The first public debate of the general election campaign for U.S. Senate was a combative two-hour session in Baltimore last night during which Democrat Benjamin L. Cardin said his opponent stands with the president on issues from Iraq to tax cuts to embryonic stem cell research. Republican Michael S. Steele said Cardin should learn to "shut up and listen."
NEWS
By JUDITH GRAHAM and JUDITH GRAHAM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
CHICAGO -- With millions of Americans losing health insurance and crying for relief from soaring medical costs, Illinois is considering a bold and once-unthinkable proposal - extending medical coverage to all state residents. It's a daunting, politically divisive and potentially expensive prospect, with 1.8 million uninsured people in the state. But experts say health care reform might stand a better chance of passing in Illinois than almost anywhere in the nation. "The odds are long, but they're much better in Illinois than most other states," said Alan Weil, executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy.
NEWS
By Camilla A. Herrera and Camilla A. Herrera,THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE | October 3, 2004
When Abigail Garner was in eighth grade, she confronted two classmates who repeatedly used the word M-tgayM-v to describe something as M-tuncoolM-v or M-tdumb.M-v M-tOne of them said, M-fWhatM-Fs your problem? Is your brother gay or something?M-F M-v she recalls in her Web site, www.familieslikemine.com, a forum for teen and adult children of gay parents. M-tM-FNo,M-F I responded. M-fMy dad is.M-FM-v It was 1985, Garner remembers, a time she felt so isolated, she believed she was the only one in the world with a gay father.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Andrea Kraus can do almost anything she wants on weekend mornings during golf season. She can browse at flea markets, sit down for a nice, leisurely brunch or spend time with her family. The only activity in which Kraus can't participate is golf. At least not at Woodholme Country Club in Pikesville, where she has been a member since 1980. It doesn't matter that the 42-year-old attorney has won the women's club championship four times and is one of the most accomplished amateur players in the area, a 10-time Baltimore City champion and two-time Maryland State champion.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Public discussion of a proposal to close one city school and reorganize four others ended Saturday with little community disagreement, a marked change from past years that commissioners attributed to a better-timed process and greater trust between officials and the local communities. Facing closure in 2012 under the plan is the Institute of Business and Entrepreneurship High School near Hanlon Park, a school officials said has faced falling graduation rates and enrollments. Two other high schools and two elementary/middle schools would see substantial changes under the plan.
FEATURES
By Judith Bolton-Fasman and Judith Bolton-Fasman,Special to The Sun | February 21, 1994
Title: "The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion"Author: Stephen L. CarterPublisher: Basic BooksLength, price: 328 pages, $25 Stephen Carter's timing is impeccable. In 1991, the 38-year-old Yale Law School professor published "Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby," a book in which he explored his ambivalent feelings about benefiting from affirmative action programs.In that book, he also called for the inclusion of black conservatives in mainstream discussions of black issues.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2002
The murders they committed were strikingly similar, but their punishments are not. Michael P. Stewart and Lawrence Borchardt Sr. were heroin addicts who, in November 1998, went out separately to hunt for drug money in quiet residential neighborhoods. Both men murdered elderly victims in brutal home-invasion robberies - crimes that occurred just seven miles apart. One murdered a Greek immigrant who built a restaurant business, raised two daughters and doted on his grandchildren. The other killed a married couple who gave freely to charities and watched over their elderly neighbors.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
Public debate about the Iager turkey farm in southern Howard County finally appears to have ended. After more than 30 hearings on the fate of the 507-acre Fulton property, both sides made their final arguments yesterday morning before the Howard County Zoning Board in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City. The first hearing was held Sept. 1. The board has not set a date for its first work session on the proposed Maple Lawn Farms Development, which calls for commercial space and almost 1,200 residential units.
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