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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
More than 500 schools across the country, including some in Maryland, use the Common Application, which enables students to apply to multiple colleges by filling out one online form. But it turns out that the organization's licensing agreement might conflict with state law, raising questions about whether the four Maryland public schools using the system can continue. At stake is exposure to thousands of potential applicants and, Morgan State University officials believe, a possible enrollment boost.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | May 25, 2014
I've been thinking a lot about college lately. It's not as though it's staring me in the face, either. The oldest is finishing his freshman year in high school. The youngest is still in elementary school. Still, what's occurring on America's college campuses is on my front burner. First and foremost is the ever-escalating cost of a four-year degree - the cause of many a sleepless night for moms and dads. Tuition, fees, room and board for many private colleges has now hit $60,000 a year.
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NEWS
By Donald N. Langenberg | June 1, 1999
FOR YEARS, Maryland high school graduates with a solid B average were virtually assured of being accepted by the University of Maryland, College Park. But that's no longer true.So many good students applied for fall enrollment to Maryland's flagship campus that officials there could accept only one-fifth of them. It's a smart bunch, too: The mean grade point average for the incoming freshman class is 3.7, compared with 3.54 last year.National trendThis surge in applications by top students to public universities is a nationwide trend that is the result of several factors, including demographics, the low cost of public universities when compared with private counterparts and higher quality public institutions .This year, some 17,000 students applied to UMCP compared with 16,200 last year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Citing a report that Marylanders are carrying the highest level of student debt in the country, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur will propose a plan Monday to make college more affordable and increase need-based financial aid. Mizeur, who is running for governor against Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler in the June 24 Democratic primary, is calling for a $12 million increase in aid based on...
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2003
A proposal to give in-state tuition rates to undocumented immigrants who live in Maryland won approval in the House of Delegates yesterday. In a vote of 82-51, the House passed the measure with minimal discussion. A similar bill is being debated on the Senate floor. "This is a significant day in the state of Maryland ... and it's a big day for American immigrants," said Del. Victor C. Ramirez, a Prince George's County Democrat. If the bill becomes law, it would give in-state tuition rates at Maryland's public colleges and universities to students who have attended public schools in the state for at least three years and graduated.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
College-bound students are thinking green this year, and it has nothing to do with ivy. Families who in the past would have favored private colleges are, amid a long economic slump, taking another look at public higher education, say Maryland college officials and high school guidance counselors. The trend - seen even in well-off families - is making admission into public universities more competitive and worrying private colleges without Ivy League reputations to go with their high cost.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 14, 1992
The cost of attending private colleges and universities rose an average 7 percent this year, while tuition and fees at public colleges and universities shot up an average 10 percent, according to the College Board's annual survey of the price of higher education.For the private institutions, where price tags for tuition, room and board are now approaching $25,000 a year, the increase is relatively modest compared with the double-digit increases of the 1980s. But the public institutions, strained by fiscal crises in many states during the past few years, continue to rely on bigger student charges to keep them afloat.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION is taking its licks these days, but a new report shows public colleges in Southern states are losing ground in providing access and opportunity to African-Americans.The report, issued yesterday by the Southern Education Foundation in Atlanta, says that by virtually all measures, efforts to desegregate higher education are lagging in the 19 states, including Maryland, that once operated dual higher education systems.Among highlights of the report, titled "Miles to Go":* Public higher education continues to be segregated in practice, if not by law. While in 1996 blacks accounted for 20 percent of the 18- to-24-year-old population, they made up only 8.6 percent of first-year students at flagship universities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 16, 2004
A national survey gives Maryland's public colleges and universities good marks for the number of students who enroll and achieve degrees, but an "F" for affordability. The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education graded the 50 states on five categories: how well students are prepared for college; how many enroll; how many finish; the economic benefits graduates bring to the state; and affordability. Maryland received B's or higher in all categories except affordability. Thirty-six other states also received F's for affordability in the survey released yesterday.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
There is no more delicate position in Maryland higher education than state secretary. The role requires a true diplomat and visionary. It requires a leader without ego, one who seeks consensus without playing favorites. And it requires someone who doesn't come to the job with vested interests.For all these reasons, Gov. Parris N. Glendening should not select an insider to fill the post of higher education secretary when incumbent Shaila R. Aery leaves in June. In fact, he ought to use Ms. Aery as a standard for selecting a new secretary.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Lisa Scott of Sparrows Point has seen young relatives graduate from college and struggle to keep up with $100,000 in education debt. "Their current jobs do not allow them to pay that debt" said Scott, area marketing director for Chick-fil-A in Maryland. "The stress on them is horrific and so much, when it should be the most exciting time of their life, coming out of college and ready to take a bite out of the world. " Scott, 48, doesn't want the same to happen to her 7-year-old daughter Lilly.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
More than 500 schools across the country, including some in Maryland, use the Common Application, which enables students to apply to multiple colleges by filling out one online form. But it turns out that the organization's licensing agreement might conflict with state law, raising questions about whether the four Maryland public schools using the system can continue. At stake is exposure to thousands of potential applicants and, Morgan State University officials believe, a possible enrollment boost.
NEWS
By Anne D. Neal | May 29, 2013
"Please sir, I want some more. " The famous phrase of Oliver Twist would seem tragically appropriate when it comes to the modus operandi of American higher education - but for the fact that Oliver Twist was a starving child and higher education is a bloated wastrel. But the higher ed bubble is bursting, right in our own backyard. And colleges and universities need to take note, to ensure their own survival. The case in point is St. Mary's College of Maryland, a 173-year-old public institution tucked between the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. After a decade of rising tuition, this public liberal arts college finds itself with 150 empty seats for the incoming freshman class.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Maryland's Dream Act, which allows some illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities, has drawn attention far out of proportion to its actual impact. Only a few hundred students are likely to be eligible for the benefit in any given year, but because it touches on the issue of who should be in this country and how we treat them, it has led to vocal and passionate campaigns on both sides. But there's a practical component to the issue, too. The Dream Act is a good investment for Maryland taxpayers, and for that reason, voters should support Question 4 on November's ballot.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | October 10, 2012
Local leaders of the Catholic, Mainline Protestant and black churches are planning to speak this evening in favor of in-state tuition breaks for illegal immigrants at Maryland's public colleges and universities, advocates said. Archbishop William Lori of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, Bishop Eugene Taylor Sutton of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, Pastor Alvin Gwynn Jr. of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance and others are scheduled to gather at 5 p.m. at the chapel at Morgan State University.
NEWS
July 2, 2012
The messy situation at the University of Virginia, which recently saw its president forced to resign by the school's governing board, only to be reinstated two weeks later after faculty and student protests, highlighted problems of institutional reform and financial sustainability that are not unique to the school founded by Thomas Jefferson. Maryland confronts many of the same challenges, which are affecting public colleges and universities across the country, but it has done so in ways that, fortunately, have allowed it to avoid many of the missteps Virginia made.
NEWS
December 7, 1992
IN MARYLAND'S colleges, things are up and down.Overall, the number of students on Maryland's campuses changed little between last fall and this fall, but there is some shifting around among campuses.In a tight economy, and with hefty tuition hikes at four-year campuses, community college enrollment was up 3.4 percent. For the second year in a row, the community colleges enrolled more students than the four-year public colleges, where enrollment dropped 1.7 percent.Historically, community college enrollment goes up in a soft economy.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr.'s promise of a badly needed 5.7 percent funding increase for Maryland's university system next fiscal year will help the state's public colleges keep pace with inflation -- after several years of losing ground. Not incidentally, it enabled the governor to avert a legislative override of his veto of a bill to increase funds for higher education by raising the corporate income tax rate. OK, for now. But the 11th-hour, one-year funding commitment doesn't begin to address the critical long-term issue: What kind of public higher-education system do Marylanders need -- and how should that be financed?
NEWS
May 3, 2012
Much of the coverage of the need for a special budget session of the Maryland legislature has focused on the political machinations of its leaders. That's understandable. But we should not ignore the impact on ordinary people if the legislature fails to finalize a budget. Major victims will be thousands of middle-income college students from every community in Maryland. The budget package proposed by Gov.Martin O'Malleyand endorsed by both houses of the legislature caps tuition hikes at 3 percent for this fall at all the public four-year campuses.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 31, 2012
President Barack Obama is right. For several decades, college tuitions in our country have risen relentlessly, faster than inflation and faster than economic growth - much like health care costs. Unless we get them under control, we'll continue to fall behind other countries in advanced skills. The good news is that Maryland has developed the model for how to do it. But we've just scratched the surface. There are four major ways to make college more affordable: •increase state investment in our public colleges; •increase efficiency in the delivery of instruction; •increase college credits earned in high school and decrease need for remediation in college; •increase competition from innovative public and private colleges.
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