Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPublic Auction
IN THE NEWS

Public Auction

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010
The Baltimore building formerly occupied by The Brass Elephant restaurant is scheduled to be sold at a public auction on the premises, 924 N. Charles St., at 2 p.m. on Aug. 3. Alex Cooper Auctioneers is handling the sale, which is a mortgage foreclosure sale on behalf of PNC Bank. The restaurant closed in August 2009 after nearly 30 years of operation. According to Alex Cooper's website, the sale involves the real estate only, not the former restaurant's furniture, fixtures, equipment or liquor license.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The Grille at Peerce's will be sold at public auction on Nov. 10, according to Daniel Billig of A. J. Billig & Co. Auctioneers. The Phoenix restaurant, formerly known as Peerce's Plantation, will remain open until the property settles, Billig said, which will likely be around the end of this year. Established in 1932, Peerce's Plantation was a landmark, family-owned Baltimore County dining destination before it closed in 2001. In 2008, the property was purchased by Joseph W. Bivona, Jr. as a venue for his Signature Catering company.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 7, 2011
Ever dreamed of owning a Kentucky Derby horse? Plenty of people have, but the buy-in price typically scares them off. Still, if you catch a horse at auction at the right time, and if you have the right eye to identify talent, you can do it without completely emptying your checkbook. Bloodhorse,com, a website that covers the horse racing industry as well as any publication out there, published a list this week showing all the prices the qualifiers for the Kentucky Derby field fetched at auction (at least those that were ever offered for public auction)
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Prime pieces of farmland like this one on the auction block in northern Baltimore County are few and far between. Ideally situated among the rolling hills of Maryland's horse country, 4101 Butler Road in Glyndon is a 189-acre, horseshoe-shaped estate adjacent to Sagamore Farm, the well-known thoroughbred horse breeding center. A completely renovated, 304-year-old farmhouse, with three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled on the property. The current owners farm out portions of the land for soybean and hay. There is also a one-bedroom cottage on a 1-plus-acre building site.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The Grille at Peerce's will be sold at public auction on Nov. 10, according to Daniel Billig of A. J. Billig & Co. Auctioneers. The Phoenix restaurant, formerly known as Peerce's Plantation, will remain open until the property settles, Billig said, which will likely be around the end of this year. Established in 1932, Peerce's Plantation was a landmark, family-owned Baltimore County dining destination before it closed in 2001. In 2008, the property was purchased by Joseph W. Bivona, Jr. as a venue for his Signature Catering company.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
A new placard -- one for a public auction -- is tacked up beside the familiar "Crab cakes and fluffs" sign outside one of the Hampden's most popular basement taverns and seafood restaurants.The owner of Frazier's Restaurant & Taproom, in the 800 block of W. 33rd St., has decided to sell his business known for its friendly atmosphere and 1940s feel -- a place where beers and crab cakes are as well known as its low ceilings and nightly roster of regular customers."This is a neighborhood bar with a citywide following," said Norman Greenspun, 60, who has owned the business with his wife, Barbara, for the past nine years.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Prime pieces of farmland like this one on the auction block in northern Baltimore County are few and far between. Ideally situated among the rolling hills of Maryland's horse country, 4101 Butler Road in Glyndon is a 189-acre, horseshoe-shaped estate adjacent to Sagamore Farm, the well-known thoroughbred horse breeding center. A completely renovated, 304-year-old farmhouse, with three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled on the property. The current owners farm out portions of the land for soybean and hay. There is also a one-bedroom cottage on a 1-plus-acre building site.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Oak Tree Farm, a family horse farm in western Baltimore County for more than 50 years, was sold yesterday at public auction for $1.5 million. Neither the seller - identified in auction documents as the estate of Alice F. Keech - nor the auctioneer would say who purchased the property in the community of Relay. However, developers have expressed interest in building homes on the 32.7-acre tract, on the southwest corner of Interstate 95 and Route 166. As recently as last year, a private company examined the possibility of developing the land, but the idea was dropped because of community opposition and lack of public water and sewer service.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
A spacious Cape Cod house on Solomons Island Road - with 6,000 square feet of space - is on the auction block. The place has high ceilings, loads of bathrooms and is situated on a busy Edgewater artery. The World War II-era building sits on more than an acre and was last occupied by Anne Arundel County police officers. The former Southern District maintains many of its former charms: lockers, a white board for shift assignments, bulletproof glass and at least five jail cells. Prospective buyers inspected the brick-front building from top to bottom at an open house this week, and a public auction of the property will be held Tuesday, marking the first time the county will try to sell a property in this fashion.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Jon Morgan and Mark Hyman and Jon Morgan,Staff Writers | February 27, 1993
With snowflakes falling on the bidders, Eli S. Jacobs' Owings Mills estate sold at public auction yesterday for $1.44 million, far below the $2.25 million the Orioles owner paid three years ago.The auction, held on the walkway leading to Mr. Jacobs' front door, lasted about 10 minutes and attracted an upscale group of house hunters to the fashionable neighborhood north of Baltimore.The long driveway leading to the house was clogged with four-wheel-drive vehicles, a Jaguar and a Mercedes. And bidders came primed for the wintry real estate battle, some wearing full-length fur coats and carrying cellular phones.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 7, 2011
Ever dreamed of owning a Kentucky Derby horse? Plenty of people have, but the buy-in price typically scares them off. Still, if you catch a horse at auction at the right time, and if you have the right eye to identify talent, you can do it without completely emptying your checkbook. Bloodhorse,com, a website that covers the horse racing industry as well as any publication out there, published a list this week showing all the prices the qualifiers for the Kentucky Derby field fetched at auction (at least those that were ever offered for public auction)
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010
The Baltimore building formerly occupied by The Brass Elephant restaurant is scheduled to be sold at a public auction on the premises, 924 N. Charles St., at 2 p.m. on Aug. 3. Alex Cooper Auctioneers is handling the sale, which is a mortgage foreclosure sale on behalf of PNC Bank. The restaurant closed in August 2009 after nearly 30 years of operation. According to Alex Cooper's website, the sale involves the real estate only, not the former restaurant's furniture, fixtures, equipment or liquor license.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
A spacious Cape Cod house on Solomons Island Road - with 6,000 square feet of space - is on the auction block. The place has high ceilings, loads of bathrooms and is situated on a busy Edgewater artery. The World War II-era building sits on more than an acre and was last occupied by Anne Arundel County police officers. The former Southern District maintains many of its former charms: lockers, a white board for shift assignments, bulletproof glass and at least five jail cells. Prospective buyers inspected the brick-front building from top to bottom at an open house this week, and a public auction of the property will be held Tuesday, marking the first time the county will try to sell a property in this fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2005
NEW YORK - There is Charlie Parker's King alto saxophone, with mother-of-pearl keys, his primary horn in the 1950s. There is Benny Goodman's clarinet, John Coltrane's soprano and tenor saxophones, Gerry Mulligan's baritone. Thelonious Monk's tailored jacket. A ribald letter from Louis Armstrong to his manager. One of Ornette Coleman's notebooks from the late 1950s, with his practice exercises and, on one of the last pages, one of his greatest compositions, "Focus on Sanity," written in pencil.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Oak Tree Farm, a family horse farm in western Baltimore County for more than 50 years, was sold yesterday at public auction for $1.5 million. Neither the seller - identified in auction documents as the estate of Alice F. Keech - nor the auctioneer would say who purchased the property in the community of Relay. However, developers have expressed interest in building homes on the 32.7-acre tract, on the southwest corner of Interstate 95 and Route 166. As recently as last year, a private company examined the possibility of developing the land, but the idea was dropped because of community opposition and lack of public water and sewer service.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
A new placard -- one for a public auction -- is tacked up beside the familiar "Crab cakes and fluffs" sign outside one of the Hampden's most popular basement taverns and seafood restaurants.The owner of Frazier's Restaurant & Taproom, in the 800 block of W. 33rd St., has decided to sell his business known for its friendly atmosphere and 1940s feel -- a place where beers and crab cakes are as well known as its low ceilings and nightly roster of regular customers."This is a neighborhood bar with a citywide following," said Norman Greenspun, 60, who has owned the business with his wife, Barbara, for the past nine years.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | February 26, 1993
Neither rain nor sleet nor snow should be a factor today, when the Greenspring Valley estate of Orioles owner Eli Jacobs hits the auction block at 11 a.m. The lenders hired Raymond C. Nichols, president of Atlantic Auctions, commercial auctioneers and appraisers, to conduct a public auction of the property.In case you're curious, Jacobs paid $2.25 million for the 6-acre property at 10605 Brooklawn Road in Owings Mills. It's a brick house with 4,000 square feet of living space and a 1,200-square-foot basement that sits in the midst of trees and landscaping.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
The mystery buyer of Eli S. Jacobs' Green Spring Valley home isn't a mystery anymore.The six-acre estate of the Orioles owner -- sold last week at public auction -- was purchased by Timothy Weglicki, a managing director at Baltimore-based Alex. Brown Inc., and his wife, Denise.The Weglickis, whose winning bid was $1.4 million, did not attend the auction, and their real-estate broker declined to disclose their names at the time.But the couple's broker, Linda Corbin, confirmed their identities yesterday after they were named as the buyer in the Daily Record.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
The mystery buyer of Eli S. Jacobs' Green Spring Valley home isn't a mystery anymore.The six-acre estate of the Orioles owner -- sold last week at public auction -- was purchased by Timothy Weglicki, a managing director at Baltimore-based Alex. Brown Inc., and his wife, Denise.The Weglickis, whose winning bid was $1.4 million, did not attend the auction, and their real-estate broker declined to disclose their names at the time.But the couple's broker, Linda Corbin, confirmed their identities yesterday after they were named as the buyer in the Daily Record.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Jon Morgan and Mark Hyman and Jon Morgan,Staff Writers | February 27, 1993
With snowflakes falling on the bidders, Eli S. Jacobs' Owings Mills estate sold at public auction yesterday for $1.44 million, far below the $2.25 million the Orioles owner paid three years ago.The auction, held on the walkway leading to Mr. Jacobs' front door, lasted about 10 minutes and attracted an upscale group of house hunters to the fashionable neighborhood north of Baltimore.The long driveway leading to the house was clogged with four-wheel-drive vehicles, a Jaguar and a Mercedes. And bidders came primed for the wintry real estate battle, some wearing full-length fur coats and carrying cellular phones.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.