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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 6, 1995
FREDERICK -- As artist Bill Cochran begins to paint gray and brown stones on an otherwise bland downtown bridge, preservationists and others here find themselves revisiting old wounds about the role of public art in the city's treasured historic district.The Carroll Street Bridge project is the latest in a series of murals to decorate the streetscape in Frederick's picturesque, 33-block historic section. When completed, the 2,000-square-foot mural will create an illusion of an arched-stone bridge over Carroll Creek.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
In the early years of Columbia, William Cochran often rode his bike from his family's home in Clarksville to explore the new city, where the fountain in man-made Wilde Lake and other examples of public art made an indelible impression. Cochran - who hails from a Howard County family of eight that includes father Ed Cochran, a former county executive, and younger sister Courtney Watson, a County Council member running for the office their father once held - was captivated by what he saw at age 10 and beyond.
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NEWS
By Crispin Sartwell | June 7, 2002
PERHAPS YOU noticed, over the last couple of months, a down-home apparition on the median strip of Mount Royal Avenue. Installed between the Lyric Opera House and North Avenue, it was the front porch of a shack, the sort you might find in Appalachia. The lumber and door were taken from an old farmhouse. The roof was corrugated tin. There was an old rocking chair, and often folks were sitting up there, gossiping, whittling, or just hanging around. The artist, Nathan Danilowicz, brought the materials down from rural Pennsylvania, where his family originates.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 23, 2013
A blank wall can be a foreboding bit of architecture. Be it brick, block, concrete or wood, a building side with no windows generally has an unwelcoming aura. Possibly, that's why in many communities, an urban American tradition has grown up that results in big, blank walls being turned into forums for artistic expression. Early in this tradition, which seems to have its roots in grassroots urban renewal efforts in the 1960s and 1970s, but in those days a fair amount of the work was done clandestinely and regarded by many as graffiti.
NEWS
By Christopher Jack Hill and Christopher Jack Hill,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
The Annapolis Art in Public Places Commission is soliciting artists for projects to be displayed around the city, in keeping with the group's mission of promoting the arts. The awards will include up to $50,000 for an outdoor sculpture, and $1,000 to $25,000 a project for artworks at up to 11 city-owned locations, including cost of installation. The three-dimensional outdoor sculpture would be displayed on the side lawn of the Compromise Street Recreation Center in downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
October 24, 2008
After a long and passionate debate, former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer appears likely to be honored with a prominent statue on Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Few would question the appropriateness of the honor or its location. But the proposal for a Schaefer statue has also performed another service for the city he loves. Questions about where this piece of public art might be located and what it should look like have reaffirmed the pivotal role of the Public Art Commission in these matters - the public's interest can be balanced against those of powerful individuals seeking to impose their view of art on the city.
NEWS
By Christopher Jack Hill and Christopher Jack Hill,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
The Annapolis Art in Public Places Commission is soliciting artists for projects to be displayed around the city, in keeping with the group's mission of promoting the arts. The awards will include up to $50,000 for an outdoor sculpture and from $1,000 to $25,000 per project for artworks at up to 11 city-owned locations, including cost of installation. The three-dimensional outdoor sculpture would be displayed on the side lawn of the Compromise Street Recreation Center in downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | December 9, 2007
What is it about public art that sparks such passionate debate? It usually begins with a generous impulse: to honor a prominent citizen, beautify the city, show respect for the importance of art in our lives. But the process of deciding just what art to put where frequently inspires strong disagreement - contention that, on reflection, has obvious roots. Public art is meant to provoke, to enlighten, to provide new ways of seeing the world around us. To be successful, an artist must have freedom to create.
FEATURES
March 7, 1991
The latest addition to downtown public art is a work with a twist on traditional art: a sculpture that's in its pedestal, not on it.On the east side of Lexington Street at Liberty, in front of the entrance to the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, is New York artist Jeffrey Schiff's bronze horse embedded chest-high in its own granite and concrete pedestal. Its head, neck, front legs and upper body show. The rest is buried in white concrete, surrounded on three sides by pink granite. This is the first part of the sculpture, which is planned to include several granite columns in the future.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
Forget the controversial Male/Female (It?) sculpture looming over Penn Station. Think of more embraceable creations: The stainless steel tubes jutting into the sky in front of the Maryland Science Center. The buoyant red sculpture gracing Pratt Street in the Inner Harbor. Or how about those concrete arcs fronting the Baltimore Visitor Center, meant to convey the "cyclical nature of human interaction"? Public art - where profundity and vagueness seemingly co-exist - sprouts in forms vast and varied in pockets across the city.
NEWS
February 7, 2013
In case you somehow missed it, though we don't know you possibly could have, Harford County turned purple during the last month, Baltimore Ravens Purple. Schools, storefronts, homes, government buildings, every conceivable business, piece of public art, baked goods and thousands of cars and trucks, all have all been adorned with the colors of the Super Bowl XLVII Champions. And, who among us in Harford hasn't donned the purple and black, as we cheered our team to the victory, many of us also outfitting our dogs, cats and other pets in similar attire.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | October 15, 2012
The Bel Air Downtown Alliance, in cooperation with the Town of Bel Air, will be sponsoring a public art project entitled, "Hearts Of Harford. " The project will be similar to Baltimore's fish sculptures that temporarily graced locations in the Inner Harbor and other places in the city in the summer and fall of 2001. The city also later had painted crab sculptures installed at various locations. The purpose of Bel Air's project, which was discussed by town government officials during the summer, "is to enhance the public space in and around downtown Bel Air, provide visual appeal to the public landscape, establish downtown Bel Air as an art destination and to honor downtown Bel Air as the 'Heart of Harford,'" the alliance said in a news release, referring to the downtown alliance's slogan.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2012
The U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis ranked as the top public liberal arts college in the country, pushing its traditional rival, the U.S. Military Academy, with which it shared the top honors last year, into the No. 2 spot, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings. "We always compete against West Point and Air Force, but first and foremost we're partners," said Cmdr. William Marks, a spokesman for the academy. "It's always nice to be recognized as being on the top. " The Naval Academy remained anchored at No. 14 among all liberal arts colleges in the annual U.S. News rankings, released Wednesday, mirroring the steady performance of other Maryland schools.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Joggers, bikers and pedestrians will soon have a good reason not to hustle when they pass through a popular yet graffiti-covered tunnel that connects the woods on either side of busy Oakland Mills Road in Columbia. The concrete walls of the 75-foot-long underpass, built in 1974, are the unlikely canvas of Mariama Barr-Dallas, an Oakland Mills High School student who was selected to paint the pair of murals to mask graffiti there and beautify Owen Brown. "I've always liked drawing, but I only recently discovered that painting is also something I can do," the 17-year-old senior said of the 8-foot-high panels depicting nature scenes and wildlife, executed in exterior house paint colors she mixes herself.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
After more than a year of deliberations, city officials have decided to place a bust of the late Frank Zappa at the Southeast Anchor Library in Highlandtown. The bust, which sits atop a tall column, is a gift from a Zappa fan club in Lithuania. It will be erected at Eastern Avenue and South Conkling Street sometime next year, said Anne Perkins, chairwoman of the Public Art Commission. "We think this is a great place for it - a terrific neighborhood" Perkins said. "I think it will be the focal point for a lot of really fun festivals."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
William Donald Schaefer spent a lifetime cultivating his reputation as a "man of the people." That's just how sculptor Rodney Carroll depicts him in the Inner Harbor sculpture that will be unveiled at 1 p.m. Monday to mark Schaefer's 88th birthday. After meeting with Baltimore's Public Art Commission and others, the sculptor chose not to position Schaefer high on a pedestal or striking a heroic pose between the two pavilions of Harborplace, as had once been suggested. Instead, he set Schaefer's figure on two low marble slabs on the Inner Harbor's west shore, where it's more part of the crowd.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 31, 1995
Taken together, the two artworks at the new Metro stations opening in Baltimore today neatly address the question of what role public art can play, and come up with two very different answers.It used to be easy to answer that question: Traditionally, public art commemorated something. It was a portrait or sculpture of a political, military or civic leader; a representation of a great moment in our history, such as the signing of the Declaration of Independence; or a tribute to those who fell in a battle or a war.Some public art created today still serves that function, such as the statue of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall being created for the Maryland State House grounds in Annapolis.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration has proposed setting aside 1 percent of the cost of all publicly financed construction projects for public art -- reviving a concept first crafted in Baltimore by then-City Councilman William Donald Schaefer but that is now rarely used. The legislation, introduced in the City Council yesterday, would create a new, nine-member Public Art Commission to consider what type of art would be appropriate for individual projects and to commission artists to do the work.
NEWS
October 24, 2008
After a long and passionate debate, former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer appears likely to be honored with a prominent statue on Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Few would question the appropriateness of the honor or its location. But the proposal for a Schaefer statue has also performed another service for the city he loves. Questions about where this piece of public art might be located and what it should look like have reaffirmed the pivotal role of the Public Art Commission in these matters - the public's interest can be balanced against those of powerful individuals seeking to impose their view of art on the city.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 17, 2008
Braking at the intersection of North Avenue and St. Paul Street, drivers breathe cigarette smoke out their windows, slosh takeout sodas, stare at their nails. No one notices that a cluster of pointy trees has sprouted in the median. No one notices that a few of the trees aren't actually alive or even green, or that, despite the July heat, one is coated with a light dusting of snow. These trees are art. No one notices that, either. Baltimore and public art have had a stormy relationship of late.
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