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NEWS
By Patrick F. Bassett, David Drinkwater and Jacqueline Smethurst | March 2, 2009
Our new president has handed the same assignment to leaders in every sector: "Rethink it." As educators, it's an invitation we welcome. The challenges faced by our nation's public and private schools are serious. Money is tight, and after so many years operating in worlds apart, it now seems clear we need each other. It is time to create public-private school partnerships in communities all over the nation. Over the past three decades, we've watched the educational and opportunity gaps widen as a disparity in resources and outcomes grows.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Just over 38,000 people have signed up for private health plans through the Maryland exchange website through March 1, according to a weekly report from exchange officials released Friday. The website has been troubled since its launch Oct. 1, and enrollment has not met targets set early on. But the site has gained more than 2,000 enrollees each week since January, and officials have said that applications could jump in the remaining days of open enrollment through March. So far, just over half, or about 20,400, have paid for their policies, on par with federal data, but not all of the payment deadlines have passed.
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NEWS
April 5, 2000
June Anderson Almquist, 75, a former Seattle Times columnist and assistant managing editor who covered high society events to women's issues, died Sunday of cancer. She was 75. Hans Gustav Gueterbock, 91, a retired University of Chicago professor and one of the world's leading scholars of ancient Near Eastern languages, died Wednesday. Sir Robert Sainsbury,93, who helped build up the venerable British supermarket chain that bears his family's name, died Sunday. Milton Brutten,77, an expert on dyslexia who founded one of the nation's first private schools for children with learning disabilities, died March 16 in Devon, Pa., of complications from a stroke.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake appointed an executive with a disaster response company Friday to lead Baltimore's Transportation Department at a time when the agency continues to struggle with its speed camera program. Her pick, William Johnson, has worked since 2005 as a senior manager at O'Brien's Response Management, which billed itself as a provider of emergency preparedness, response management and crisis services when it merged last year with another firm. Johnson has 20 years of public- and private-sector experience in urban transportation, public works, and emergency preparation and response, the mayor's office said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 24, 2002
Victory for Kids: The Cleveland School Voucher Case, by David L. Brennan. New Millennium Press. 176 pages. $21.95. This brief, simply-stated book traces the 10-year battle that led up to the U.S. Supreme Court's Zelman v. Simmons-Harris decision, a 5-4 conclusion that ultimately may have more impact on public education policy in the United States than any other occurrence since Brown v. Board of Education ordered desegregation of U.S. schools in 1954....
NEWS
December 4, 1997
WEST BALTIMORE SEN. Larry Young has blurred the line between his public and private roles. The situation screams "conflict of interest," but he does not see it. Instead, he views his legislative seat in Annapolis as a way to give himself "leverage," as he put it in a letter to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller.Drawing a line between an elected official's public duties and his private activities has always been a cause for concern. This is especially true in the Maryland General Assembly, whose members are part-timers.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Health care fraud is the fastest-growing criminal enterprise in the United States -- costing government and private insurance plans at least $44 billion a year -- and federal investigators are far behind the crooks, FBI Director Louis J. Freeh told Congress yesterday.Fraud schemes are so profitable that street gangs and cocaine distributors in South Florida, Southern California and other parts of the country are turning to ripping off Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance companies, Mr. Freeh said.
NEWS
By Mark K. Shriver | December 15, 1992
THE Los Angeles riots, the chaos in Crown Heights and the urban turmoil of the past year have made it abundantly clear that America needs a new approach to its urban problems.Bill Clinton was elected largely because his campaign focused so resolutely on new solutions.But to deliver on his promise of change, Mr. Clinton must not play the "either-or" game.We can't spend four more years debating whether social services should be delivered by the public sector or the private sector. Instead, the president-elect should rely on each -- singly or in tandem -- to carry out his policies.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | May 24, 1993
It ain't easy being a columnist these days. No sooner had a recent column on my opinion of fund-raising by public agencies -- my opinion was negative -- hit the streets, than I received a barrage of phone calls and several letters.After listening to and reading the responses, I'd like to devote this column to the opposing views of three of them. I will try to avoid editorializing on them. I've apparently said enough on the topic already.The most vociferous response was from a man who called and said that I was the biggest jerk he'd ever read in any paper.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 3, 1998
BOSTON -- What then is the most surprising discovery as we go spelunking down the endless caverns of this tawdry scandal?That Dick Morris actually hypothesized "what if" Hillary Rodham Clinton was "not necessarily into regular sex with men"? No, that's standard Morris procedure.That Penthouse magazine offered Monica Lewinsky $2 million to pose partially nude? That's Penthouse being Penthouse.That another couple, the Bleilers, were forced to display their tattered marriage on television? No one ever doubted that the dirt would spread like the spot in "The Cat in the Hat."
NEWS
December 15, 2012
Jim Rogers ("Government workers deserve no sympathy," Dec. 11) denies sympathy to federal employees who complain about attacks on their pay and benefits. Truth is, federal employees have it good, like private-sector employees in those European "socialist" countries that our politicians denigrate. But over there, at least for northern industrial countries like Germany and France, private and public employee compensation is about the same (European Central Bank, Working Paper 1406) - public employees are ahead in southern Europe.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
If a tree falls in a Maryland forest, does anyone know its value? State Forester Steve Koehn threw back his head and laughed when asked that question. And then he jumped at the chance to shed some light on what he calls one of Maryland's best-kept secrets. "Forest products are a $4 billion-a-year industry in Maryland," he said. "For comparison, seafood is a $950 million industry. " Koehn stood on a gentle slope in the middle of a towering stand of poplar trees, their golden leaves electrified by a bright fall sun. Eighteen months ago, loggers harvested that private plot in western Baltimore County, removing about half of the trees.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Jina Shin, a South Korean schools budget analyst in the U.S. for three weeks of study, stood in a schoolyard among a boisterous crowd of children, teachers and parents at dismissal. The end of the school day at St. Mark's School in Catonsville is fairly typical of most in terms of noise, enthusiasm and organization. "It is strange to see so many parents here to pick up their children," she said. "In Korea, children, even the little ones, get home by themselves. " Although she has also found American students a bit more lively in the classroom than their Korean counterparts, she has noticed more similarities than differences in the schools systems, she said.
NEWS
May 22, 2012
Columnist Thomas Schaller makes a very solid argument about the relative ability of the government and free markets to get things done ("Government is flawed, but markets are too," May 15). His critics' arguments, however, fall flat. One reader wrote that competition in the private sector this leads to greater efficiency and better outcomes. But this argument fails to take into account the effect of monopolies and oligopolies on the supposed free market. Many industries are so expensive to get into that only a few players run the show (think of cable TV and energy)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck | April 15, 2012
As soon as my husband walks through the front door, I usually can tell whether the high school baseball team he helps coach has won a game. A slow shuffle into the kitchen means a loss. A hearty hello means a win. But lately, wins by double digits have left him feeling defeated. His team is participating in the second annual President's Cup, a tournament in which nine of Baltimore's public high school baseball teams compete against seven private city school teams, with the championship game to be held next Saturday at Camden Yards - pretty heady stuff for any kid. The goals of the tournament, initiated by Baltimore City Council PresidentBernard C. "Jack" Young, are to reignite a passion for baseball among the city's youth, raise money to renovate city ball fields (as of March 24, it had raised $166,000)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's 2012 President's Cup "Growing the Game" initiative kicked off Saturday with ball-field renovations at Forest Park. Young used the event at to unveil the initiative, a campaign designed to give young people the chance to play on safe, well-maintained baseball fields, Young's office said. Athletes from local public and private high schools paired up with the Orioles' ground crew and Brickman Sports Turf to improve three public fields, according to Young's office.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 20, 2005
All day Saturday, veterans and newcomers by the thousands marveled at the course for the area's most prestigious invitational cross country meet, the Bull Run at Hereford, as kids from the four corners of Maryland, as well as from Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia ran and ran up and down the hills at Parkton. And, as if right out of a line out of a Stevie Wonder classic, kids from public and private schools from all over the Mid-Atlantic ran together and against each other. With any luck, it will happen again next year.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | March 20, 1995
Washington. -- In this high season of government bashing, some attention should be given to a neglected reality, namely, that personal incompetence and organizational asininity are probably about evenly distributed across the public and private sectors.A different impression arises from the corresponding political broadsides of Republicans and Democrats as they compete in denunciations of government and in adulation of business and industry. Messrs. Clinton and Gore insist that government is so bloated and inefficient that it must be reinvented.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Sabriaya Shipley enrolled in a summer learning program that her mother promised would offer new experiences. But when the 15-year-old city girl discovered those experiences would be on horseback at a school in Baltimore County, she balked, at least a bit. "At first I said, 'No way,'" said Sabriaya, a rising sophomore at the Institute of Notre Dame in Baltimore. "I never thought I would even get on a horse, let alone lead one around the ring. Now I am trotting on one. Now I can say I play polo.
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