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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Anne Arundel County judge has overturned a landmark Annapolis law denying city liquor licenses to private clubs whose membership bylaws discriminate on the basis of race, gender or ethnic background.An Annapolis lawmaker who two years ago helped usher the bill into law amid controversy decried the decision as a setback for civil rights in Maryland's capital.The ruling yesterday by Circuit Judge James C. Cawood Jr. was in response to a challenge to the law from an all-male Annapolis Elks lodge, whose liquor license expires at the end of this month.
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NEWS
August 21, 2001
SIXTEEN MONTHS before the vote, passions already are running high over an anti-discrimination law that would protect gays in the workplace, when they rent or buy homes or in restaurants and hotels. It shouldn't be so controversial. The law passed in the spring isn't that different from what's on the books in 11 states and in Baltimore City and Howard, Montgomery and Prince George's counties. It's the same anti-bias law that already applies here on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, religion, national origin, marital status and physical or mental handicaps.
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NEWS
By JACK L. LEVIN | May 28, 1996
DIRE consequences are predicted should 60 inner-city families be relocated to Baltimore County suburban neighborhoods. But the heavens didn't fall on similar occasions in the past.The clergymen's protest against racial exclusion at Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, on July 4, 1963, was supposed to bring the destruction of thousands of businesses. I remember it vividly. My minister, Rabbi Morris Lieberman of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, was a leader of the protest, and I had to defend his actions against members of the congregation who disapproved of a rabbi practicing what he preached.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 8, 1999
Velleggia's Restaurant is appealing a Maryland Commission on Human Relations' Appeals Board ruling that the Little Italy establishment discriminated against the disabled.The ruling stems from a complaint made to the commission in August 1996 by a patron in a wheelchair who could not use the restaurant's main entrance, which has only steps.The commission investigated and ruled that Velleggia's was discriminating against people with disabilities by not making a reasonable accommodation for those in wheelchairs.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Anne Arundel County judge yesterday overturned a landmark Annapolis law denying city liquor licenses to private clubs whose membership bylaws discriminate on the basis of race, gender or ethnic background.An Annapolis lawmaker who two years ago helped usher the bill into law amid controversy decried the decision as a setback for civil rights in Maryland's capital.The ruling by Circuit Judge James C. Cawood Jr. was in response to a challenge to the law from an all-male Annapolis Elks lodge, whose liquor license expires at the end of this month.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Your editorial, "Making the Disabilities Act Work" (Nov. 24), was both misguided and misinformed.I am not referring to the specifics of the incident or the subsequent complaint filed by Roberta Stein or her relatives. What I object to is the editorial's stance that persons with disabilities should call "an unfamiliar restaurant in advance to alert the owner about her special need" just as "any parent who wanted to know if the place had high chairs" might do.It is quite clear that such advance notice is not required under ADA, as the editorial correctly notes.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Justice Department proposed yesterday regulations outlining steps that businesses such as restaurants, stores and theaters would have to take to comply with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.The rules would require businesses that function as public accommodations to remove barriers in existing facilities and make other reasonable changes to give disabled people equal access.Stricter standards, requiring a "high degree of convenient access" for the disabled, would be imposed for facilities being altered and buildings that open after Jan. 26, 1993.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 8, 1999
Velleggia's Restaurant is appealing a Maryland Commission on Human Relations' Appeals Board ruling that the Little Italy establishment discriminated against the disabled.The ruling stems from a complaint made to the commission in August 1996 by a patron in a wheelchair who could not use the restaurant's main entrance, which has only steps.The commission investigated and ruled that Velleggia's was discriminating against people with disabilities by not making a reasonable accommodation for those in wheelchairs.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | February 26, 1992
An Annapolis firm has begun taking one of the nation's most comprehensive looks at a new law aimed at eliminating barriers of all types for the disabled.Robert G. Kramer & Associates Inc. has won a contract to monitor the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires nearly all U.S. businesses, governments and other groups to eliminate discrimination in employment, public accommodations, public transportation and telecommunications.The National Council on Disability, which helped draft the ADA and will advise the president and Congress on the law, has asked Kramer& Associates to study the law as it takes effect in several stages.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
Maryland lawmakers killed yesterday a gay-rights bill that would have prohibited discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation.It is the fourth consecutive year a committee of the House of Delegates has defeated the proposal.With little debate, the Commerce and Government Matters Committee voted 12-7 against House Bill 213, --ing advocates' hopes that a different panel and numerous new faces in the legislature would help the bill's chances.The House Judiciary Committee shot the proposal down the last three years, including a 10-10 vote in 1994.
NEWS
By JACK L. LEVIN | May 28, 1996
DIRE consequences are predicted should 60 inner-city families be relocated to Baltimore County suburban neighborhoods. But the heavens didn't fall on similar occasions in the past.The clergymen's protest against racial exclusion at Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, on July 4, 1963, was supposed to bring the destruction of thousands of businesses. I remember it vividly. My minister, Rabbi Morris Lieberman of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, was a leader of the protest, and I had to defend his actions against members of the congregation who disapproved of a rabbi practicing what he preached.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
Maryland lawmakers killed yesterday a gay-rights bill that would have prohibited discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation.It is the fourth consecutive year a committee of the House of Delegates has defeated the proposal.With little debate, the Commerce and Government Matters Committee voted 12-7 against House Bill 213, --ing advocates' hopes that a different panel and numerous new faces in the legislature would help the bill's chances.The House Judiciary Committee shot the proposal down the last three years, including a 10-10 vote in 1994.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 2, 1994
Out there in the political chill stands Bill Brock, plaintively asking why Paul Sarbanes won't come outside and talk to him in public. Brock should know better. Sarbanes is one of the quiet men of the U.S. Senate. But if he starts to talk, he might mention a whole history that Bill Brock would rather nobody notice.Brock's been dancing around that history. He's 63 years old, and he's been in the political business for three decades, but not so that many around here would notice. He runs television commercials every day now boasting of his political profile.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Your editorial, "Making the Disabilities Act Work" (Nov. 24), was both misguided and misinformed.I am not referring to the specifics of the incident or the subsequent complaint filed by Roberta Stein or her relatives. What I object to is the editorial's stance that persons with disabilities should call "an unfamiliar restaurant in advance to alert the owner about her special need" just as "any parent who wanted to know if the place had high chairs" might do.It is quite clear that such advance notice is not required under ADA, as the editorial correctly notes.
NEWS
By Julian L. Lapides | August 18, 1993
IT'S difficult to believe that 30 years ago many Marylanders could not be served a Coca-Cola at a soda fountain or a bowl of soup at a restaurant or be allowed to spend the night at a hotel of their choice.Many parts of Maryland were still segregated, and state laws did not protect the rights of all citizens.Alex Stark, who died last week, was a tremendous force in changing this.In 1962, by two votes, the Maryland House of Delegates failed to pass a public accommodations bill which would have guaranteed every Marylander the right to be served in public establishments.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Anne Arundel County judge has overturned a landmark Annapolis law denying city liquor licenses to private clubs whose membership bylaws discriminate on the basis of race, gender or ethnic background.An Annapolis lawmaker who two years ago helped usher the bill into law amid controversy decried the decision as a setback for civil rights in Maryland's capital.The ruling yesterday by Circuit Judge James C. Cawood Jr. was in response to a challenge to the law from an all-male Annapolis Elks lodge, whose liquor license expires at the end of this month.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
SIXTEEN MONTHS before the vote, passions already are running high over an anti-discrimination law that would protect gays in the workplace, when they rent or buy homes or in restaurants and hotels. It shouldn't be so controversial. The law passed in the spring isn't that different from what's on the books in 11 states and in Baltimore City and Howard, Montgomery and Prince George's counties. It's the same anti-bias law that already applies here on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, religion, national origin, marital status and physical or mental handicaps.
NEWS
By Julian L. Lapides | August 18, 1993
IT'S difficult to believe that 30 years ago many Marylanders could not be served a Coca-Cola at a soda fountain or a bowl of soup at a restaurant or be allowed to spend the night at a hotel of their choice.Many parts of Maryland were still segregated, and state laws did not protect the rights of all citizens.Alex Stark, who died last week, was a tremendous force in changing this.In 1962, by two votes, the Maryland House of Delegates failed to pass a public accommodations bill which would have guaranteed every Marylander the right to be served in public establishments.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Anne Arundel County judge yesterday overturned a landmark Annapolis law denying city liquor licenses to private clubs whose membership bylaws discriminate on the basis of race, gender or ethnic background.An Annapolis lawmaker who two years ago helped usher the bill into law amid controversy decried the decision as a setback for civil rights in Maryland's capital.The ruling by Circuit Judge James C. Cawood Jr. was in response to a challenge to the law from an all-male Annapolis Elks lodge, whose liquor license expires at the end of this month.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | February 26, 1992
An Annapolis firm has begun taking one of the nation's most comprehensive looks at a new law aimed at eliminating barriers of all types for the disabled.Robert G. Kramer & Associates Inc. has won a contract to monitor the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires nearly all U.S. businesses, governments and other groups to eliminate discrimination in employment, public accommodations, public transportation and telecommunications.The National Council on Disability, which helped draft the ADA and will advise the president and Congress on the law, has asked Kramer& Associates to study the law as it takes effect in several stages.
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