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Tim Wheeler | July 30, 2012
A new plan calls for increasing public access to the Chesapeake Bay by adding more than 300 new spots along the shore where people can fish, swim, put a boat in the water or just enjoy the view. The draft " watershed public access plan " released late last week by the National Park Service lays out a blueprint for boosting by more than 25 percent the number of sites where the public can get to the bay and its tributaries.  That was one of the goals in a 2010 bay restoration strategy developed by the Obama administration.
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NEWS
September 23, 2014
There's simply no excuse for the Secret Service to have allowed an apparently deranged man to vault over the White House fence on Friday then sprint across the lawn and actually enter the president's residence through an unlocked door before he was tackled and apprehended. Heads should roll for a breach of security of this magnitude at what ought to be one of the country's most heavily guarded facilities. But it shouldn't come at the expense of the public's access to a historic site that symbolizes the nation's tradition of open governance and accountability to the citizens it serves.
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | August 12, 2014
Hikers may soon be able to walk on extended public trails in the Sweet Air section of Gunpowder Falls State Park in Baltimore County, and anglers may have additional access to the Sawmill Branch of the Little Gunpowder River. On Wednesday, Aug. 13, the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will go before the state Board of Public Works to request approval to buy a conservation easement on 209 acres of land next to that section of the park for $995,000. "We're very pleased to preserve this section of the park and at the same time provide public access," said Emily Wilson, director of land acquisition and planning for the state DNR. DNR is requesting the easement purchase through its Program Open Space, a nationally recognized program that acquires and develops recreational and open space areas.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
David Robeson would bump into them in the aisles at the supermarket: shoppers who had no clue how to prepare a meal."They're just standing in front of the cases and they want dinner, but they don't even know what they're looking at," said the 31-year-old Columbia man who said he's found a way to help the domestically challenged.Mr. Robeson is producing a show called "Food for Thought," one of four new health programs scheduled to appear this fall on public access Channel 6. It is the greatest number of health shows ever produced at one time for the cable channel, said public access coordinator Don Perkins.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer Staff writer Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | August 16, 1993
Gay activists and evangelical preachers. Rock 'n' roll and baby showers.All could be part of the lineup when Baltimore's public access cable television channel opens for business on Sept. 6."It's going to be a potpourri," predicted Phil Sibley, a local producer who plans to air two rock 'n' roll variety programs. He is among a disparate group of would-be producers who want air time for their shows.Public-access cable television -- which allows citizens to air programs that commercial stations can't produce or aren't interested in producing -- has been a staple in other cities for years.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | May 25, 2007
Aiming to get the word out to minorities about county services, a local group will take to the airwaves with a series of shows on the county's public access station. The first of four shows, Voz Latina, which translates to Latino Voice, starts tonight at 6 on Channel 99 on Comcast and Channel 39 on Verizon's FIOs television services. The rest of the programming slate, which will begin airing next month, includes, Our Community, Your Voice, targeted at African- Americans and a show called Korean-Americans in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Candus Thomson and Del Quentin Wilber and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
Worried about the safety of police officers, a judicial panel and leaders of Maryland's two most populous counties took steps yesterday to bar public access to arrest warrants until suspects have been served.A Maryland judicial rules subcommittee that governs criminal rules and procedure for the state's courts voted unanimously to close public access to unserved warrants, saying the threat to police officers far outweighed the public's right to know.And Executives Wayne K. Curry of Prince George's County and Douglas M. Duncan of Montgomery County said they would ask their state legislators to sponsor a bill next month to restrict warrant access.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
Next month, public officials in Carroll will begin serious talk about their spending plans but, for the most part, the public won't be in on the discussions.While most of the county's elected leaders generally agree that the public has a right to know how its money will be spent, some see nothing wrong with keeping the public away from budget workshops, public employee salaries and other financial details.While Maryland law gives elected officials broad leeway in deciding what is public, at least two municipal councils in Carroll County have been challenged this year for refusing to open their proceedings to the public.
NEWS
By JAMES S. KEAT | March 12, 2006
For centuries, Americans have had the right to inspect almost all records filed in their courthouses. All they had to do was go there and ask. Now that court records are increasingly stored in computers, accessible from people's homes through the Internet, this cherished right is under attack. For example, advocates for personal privacy and victims' rights argue that the easy access to court files, particularly in criminal cases, is unduly intrusive and potentially hazardous. The serious problem of witness intimidation in Baltimore and elsewhere has heightened their concerns.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Anne Arundel County officially opened a new water access point Wednesday in Shady Side, an offshoot of a citizen-led effort to increase public access to bodies of water. More than 70 residents and county officials attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony at Shady Side Park, and officials said attendees brought more than 30 kayaks to give the new facility a test drive. The access point - on Parish Creek, which feeds into the West and Rhode rivers - offers enthusiasts a place to put in their kayaks, canoes, inner tubes and paddleboards.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Government watchdog group Common Cause Maryland and other transparency advocates say they're enthusiastic about proposed General Assembly legislation that would create a panel to oversee public information requests. Baltimore Del. Jill P. Carter's bill would create an oversight board to which citizens and the media could appeal heavily redacted or denied requests. State law outlines the information available to the public; some items such as personnel reports can be withheld. Currently, citizens must sue the government in Circuit Court to seek documents if state or local officials do not provide the requested information.
NEWS
Aegis report | November 4, 2013
Harford County Government has a new television show called "Harford Happenings" airing on Harford Cable Network, and hosted by the county's Public Information Officer Sherrie Johnson. Each month, Johnson will bring an inside look at county government, its departments and its staff. The goal of the show is to educate the public on the activities of their government. "We want to let people know the positive things that are happening in Harford County Government and I am so excited to have this opportunity to showcase our initiatives," Johnson said in a press release.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 30, 2012
A new plan calls for increasing public access to the Chesapeake Bay by adding more than 300 new spots along the shore where people can fish, swim, put a boat in the water or just enjoy the view. The draft " watershed public access plan " released late last week by the National Park Service lays out a blueprint for boosting by more than 25 percent the number of sites where the public can get to the bay and its tributaries.  That was one of the goals in a 2010 bay restoration strategy developed by the Obama administration.
NEWS
June 7, 2012
As an educator, certified Maryland public librarian and member of the Harford County community, I am disappointed and embarrassed by the Harford County Public Library's decision to censor the "50 Shades of Grey" series by E. L. James ("Too hot for Harford, librarian concludes," May 31). County library director Mary Hastler has denied censoring the book. However, by the American Library Association's own definition, censorship is "the suppression of ideas and information that certain persons - individuals, groups or government officials - find objectionable or dangerous.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
The City Council overwhelmingly approved awarding a 12-year cable franchise to Comcast last night after a year of negotiations that recently turned contentious over funding for public access programming. The 16-1 vote, with two abstentions, was one of the last measures acted on by the departing council at a meeting filled with ceremonial send-offs for seven incumbents not returning Thursday to be inaugurated as members of the newly elected council. The council's approval delivered a final legislative victory to Mayor Martin O'Malley, who will begin his second term with a noon inauguration today at the War Memorial Building.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
Advocates of public-access television -- some with video cameras in hand -- swarmed a City Hall hearing last night to voice opposition to a proposed 12-year franchise deal with cable provider Comcast, a contract that some fear could freeze out citizen programs. Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration supports the deal, in which Comcast would pay the city $4.3 million a year. Comcast would also collect a 50-cents-a- month subscriber fee -- or about $700,000 a year total -- to fund public channels for government, education and public-access programs.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The city expects to start construction this fall on one of the final sections of the seven-mile Inner Harbor promenade. The $6.6 million project will replace a temporary wooden walkway with brick to match the rest of the promenade. It will connect to the path at President and Lancaster streets and stretch about a quarter-mile, from East Falls Avenue to Katyn Memorial Circle. The work, which to minimize disruptions will be done from barges, is expected to take a year to complete.
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