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NEWS
November 30, 2010
With less than 1 percent of the American population having served in our post-9/11 military, the aggregate impact of two wars is felt by relatively few. The consequences of this reality are troubling, but few are understood less than post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Childs Walker's November 20 article ("War veteran barred from CCBC campus for frank words on killing") highlights one of the most difficult issues facing our wounded warriors. Mr. Walker writes about Charles Whittington, a former U.S. Army infantryman who served in Iraq.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Op-ed writer Nate Greenslit is exactly correct in arguing that it would benefit the proponents of the use of psychedelics to focus the discussion toward the treatment of medical ailments ( "Are psychedelics the next medical marijuana?" Aug. 6). However, unlike medical marijuana, which is primarily being used to treat pain and glaucoma, the benefits to the field of psychotherapy and healing from psychedelics is enormous. Psychedelics actually have the potential cure depression, anxiety, phobias, PTSD and other mental illness.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 14, 2012
A Baltimore police sergeant who says he shot and killed a young man in 2005 is suing the agency, saying it refused to help him with his post traumatic stress disorder. The sergeant, Richard A. Willard, is not on active duty. He owns the gourmet grill cheese food truck parks in various parts of the city. City officials declined to comment on the suit, citing policy of not addressing pending litigation. Willard, who has been an officer since 1992, says in the suit that he shot the man to protect fellow officers, but "nevertheless felt regret for killing the young man, despite the justified and even necessary nature of his action.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
To say I was appalled by Richard Vatz's recent commentary on mental illness would be an understatement ( "Stigma can be a good thing," April 8). Mr. Vatz takes us back more than 50 years to psychiatrist and author Thomas Szasz' book, "The Myth of Mental Illness," while ignoring all the research and studies done since then. Mr. Vatz must lead a perfect life, with no depression, no thought disorder, no PTSD and no mood disorder, not even anxiety. So he's fine with stigmatizing all of the people he sees as having "fake" complaints who act out behaviors they "choose" to engage in. As he sees it, if you didn't seek help - and here I refer especially to what we know about Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans - it's your own fault, not because there is stigma.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The Department of Veterans Affairs is approving claims for post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from military sexual assault or harassment at rates that are "significantly lower" than those for PTSD from combat and other causes, advocacy groups said Thursday. The advocates said the lower rates mean women - who are more likely than men to file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma - are denied compensation for PTSD disproportionately. But when men do file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma, they said, they are approved at rates lower than those for women.
NEWS
May 17, 2010
Maryland should be proud of leading the nation with a law that bars schools from automatically giving test scores and student contact information to military recruiters. Students do not need pressure from recruiters for making a career choice that could harm them, perhaps even take their life or cause them to have post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a condition that can be worse than death. PTSD could cause perpetual depression and/or suicide. There are more life affirming career choices that we should encourage our youth to pursue.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
Jacob Mendes Da Costa, a U.S. Army surgeon during the Civil War, was among the first to study them: battle-weary warriors who sweat profusely, startle easily and exhibit irregular heartbeats. Baffled, he and others dubbed the affliction "soldier's heart." It would be the first of many labels that doctors would give to stress-related illnesses in subsequent years: shell shock, battle fatigue, war neurosis - even battered wife syndrome, as symptoms began showing up off the battlefield. Now, nearly 150 years after doctors first began puzzling over stress-related sickness, scientists are finally uncovering clues to its biological roots.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | February 26, 1991
When Johnny and Jane come marching home again, the hurrahs will be a lot more helpful than the unfriendly welcome was the last time around.In fact, the probability that Persian Gulf veterans will get hurrahs should be part of the healing process for those who come back primed for the nightmares, flashbacks, hyper-vigilance or, alternatively, the emotional shut-down now recognized as symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD)."Right now the people in Desert Storm are heroes. I hope it stays that way," said psychologist Aphrodite Matsakis, clinical coordinator of the Silver Spring Vet Center.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 10, 2002
Someday, people may walk into an emergency room after a rape, or a car wreck, or a shooting, and be given a pill to protect them from the haunting memories that may follow. For millions of war veterans, abuse victims and others, the psychological shock after a traumatic event can be as damaging as the event. Post-traumatic stress disorder, which affects an estimated 3 percent to 8 percent of the population, is typically treated with therapy to help the victim live with the memory. But a researcher from Boston University will present research Friday that suggests doctors can keep a traumatic memory from being engraved vividly into the victim's mind in the first place.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Op-ed writer Nate Greenslit is exactly correct in arguing that it would benefit the proponents of the use of psychedelics to focus the discussion toward the treatment of medical ailments ( "Are psychedelics the next medical marijuana?" Aug. 6). However, unlike medical marijuana, which is primarily being used to treat pain and glaucoma, the benefits to the field of psychotherapy and healing from psychedelics is enormous. Psychedelics actually have the potential cure depression, anxiety, phobias, PTSD and other mental illness.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
While columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has written some heartfelt words to his son that no doubt come from wanting nothing but the best for him, he has made some assertions that just don't hold water ( "A letter to my son on marijuana," Feb. 16). Those people you saw in the prison whose problems started with addiction, well they didn't start with addiction. Addiction is a sign of mental health problems. If someone doesn't feel comfortable in their own skin, it is a relief to not feel like they normally do. Addictive substances are so alluring because they make the pain go away, if only temporarily.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
We praise our military heroes for their courage in battle, as we should. But there are other heroes from the military who deserve our acclaim as well - the sexually abused men and women who have come forward in the public eye ("Military sexual assault victims break the silence," Dec. 15). By showing their faces and giving their names, they demonstrate monumental courage to push past their shame and stand up for a basic human right - to live safely in one's body. They are protesting against a military system that averts its eyes and, by not holding the perpetrators accountable, collaborates with sexual predators.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The Department of Veterans Affairs is approving claims for post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from military sexual assault or harassment at rates that are "significantly lower" than those for PTSD from combat and other causes, advocacy groups said Thursday. The advocates said the lower rates mean women - who are more likely than men to file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma - are denied compensation for PTSD disproportionately. But when men do file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma, they said, they are approved at rates lower than those for women.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 24, 2012
Sgt. Richard Willard, who this week settled a lawsuit he filed against the city alleging he never got help after fatally shooting a man in 2005, sent me an email wanting to explain his situation further. I had talked to his attorney on Wednesday. The sergeant, who agreed to drop his litigation in exchange for the city dropping its bid to fire him, will retire July 1, giving him 20 years on the job and enough time to collect his pension, about half his $73,000 salary. His allegations raised questions about whether city officers who fire their guns suffer emotional distress and whether the department gives them enough help.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 14, 2012
A Baltimore police sergeant who says he shot and killed a young man in 2005 is suing the agency, saying it refused to help him with his post traumatic stress disorder. The sergeant, Richard A. Willard, is not on active duty. He owns the gourmet grill cheese food truck parks in various parts of the city. City officials declined to comment on the suit, citing policy of not addressing pending litigation. Willard, who has been an officer since 1992, says in the suit that he shot the man to protect fellow officers, but "nevertheless felt regret for killing the young man, despite the justified and even necessary nature of his action.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
The president's announcement of the start of Afghanistan troop withdrawals marks a new phase in the war on terror. No group of Americans will be happier about the reduction of forces in harm's way than our service members and their families. And whether or not one agrees with the reasons for the withdrawal, all Americans can rejoice in the return of our soldiers and Marines from combat. To be sure, they are not all coming home at once, and many thousands remain on the front lines.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
To say I was appalled by Richard Vatz's recent commentary on mental illness would be an understatement ( "Stigma can be a good thing," April 8). Mr. Vatz takes us back more than 50 years to psychiatrist and author Thomas Szasz' book, "The Myth of Mental Illness," while ignoring all the research and studies done since then. Mr. Vatz must lead a perfect life, with no depression, no thought disorder, no PTSD and no mood disorder, not even anxiety. So he's fine with stigmatizing all of the people he sees as having "fake" complaints who act out behaviors they "choose" to engage in. As he sees it, if you didn't seek help - and here I refer especially to what we know about Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans - it's your own fault, not because there is stigma.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
We praise our military heroes for their courage in battle, as we should. But there are other heroes from the military who deserve our acclaim as well - the sexually abused men and women who have come forward in the public eye ("Military sexual assault victims break the silence," Dec. 15). By showing their faces and giving their names, they demonstrate monumental courage to push past their shame and stand up for a basic human right - to live safely in one's body. They are protesting against a military system that averts its eyes and, by not holding the perpetrators accountable, collaborates with sexual predators.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
It was after 1 a.m. on June 5, 2010. Tyrone Brown had already had plenty to drink. But he wasn't ready to go home. The 32-year-old Baltimore native tried to drag his sister and a friend into Club Hippo, but they didn't want to go into a gay bar , according to a police account. He got touchy with some women standing outside, moving to hug one, and grabbing the butt of another. When she smacked him, he shoved her back. The woman's companion stepped in. As the confrontation escalated, the companion - off-duty Baltimore Police Officer Gahiji Tshamba - pulled his service weapon and unloaded it into Brown.
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