Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPta President
IN THE NEWS

Pta President

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1999
TERESA STEGER takes her commitments seriously.Last year, she served as president of the PTA at Marley Middle School, and she didn't have a child in the school.Stepping into the leadership position was not her idea. In 1997, she was elected vice president. Although she had never held a PTA office before, she was enthusiastic about the school. Her oldest daughter, Kelly, now beginning her sophomore year at Glen Burnie High, came to Marley Middle from a private school."I was a little hesitant about putting her in public school," Steger said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 2011
I feel compelled to address the issues discussed in Erica Green 's recent article specific to Roland Park Elementary/Middle School ("Roland Park parents push for middle-school recess," Sept. 23). I am the parent of a current Roland Park Elementary 5th grader and also the parent of a recent middle school graduate. My son is now one of only 18 freshman accepted to the theater program at Baltimore School for the Arts. He was also accepted to the highly challenging and competitive "Ingenuity Program" offered at Poly.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1999
SWANSFIELD Elementary School's PTA president, Abby Futter, is a woman with a mission. She's organizing the school community to spread the word: Swansfield may be an older school, but it's a great school and a great community, she says.Futter says Swansfield's reputation and the reputation of the school conflict with reality."It's been driving me nuts for years," she says. "I think that people feel that just because it's not an affluent area, that it's not a good school. I don't believe that's true.
NEWS
August 27, 2011
As reported in The Sun, the state legislature formed a summer study task force to examine the current school board selection process in Baltimore County ("Elections for school boards weighed," Aug 4). The group was formed after legislators received numerous complaints from parents and community groups regarding BCPS and their poor handling of issues such as botched school renovations, major overcrowding in schools, AIM, and banning PTA craft fairs and community groups from public schools.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
The PTA Council of Baltimore County asked yesterday for the resignation of Renae Moore, president of the Owings Mills Elementary School's PTA, because she can't account for more than $4,000 raised from book fairs and bake and candy sales last year, PTA Council officials said. After spending months auditing the incomplete records of the Owings Mills PTA, council officials said they can't find proof that several checks were used to pay for books, library cards and other goods for the school.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Deborah A. Rice, a former software designer and volunteer, died Monday of head and neck cancer at her Timonium home. She was 42. Deborah A. Budacz, the daughter of a steamship executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1985, she earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Loyola College. Mrs. Rice went to work for Century Computing, a Laurel software development company, as a member of a team that developed software for certain control systems used on the NASA space shuttles.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
GRETCHEN TARLETON bridges the gap between middle-class Franklin Elementary School in Reisterstown and poor Westport Element- ary-Middle School in South Baltimore. She's PTA president of the former, teacher of a combined first- and second-grade class at the latter.She'd like you to know that though the schools are different -- the one mostly white with a 6.4 percent poverty rate, the other mostly black with 93 percent of its students eligible for school lunch subsidies -- the kids are pretty much the same.
NEWS
October 12, 1994
A 41-year-old Glen Burnie man pleaded guilty yesterday to theft and forgery for stealing $6,400 from his child's school PTA funds.Charles R. Nastasi of the 500 block of Vista Ave. admitted in Anne Arundel Circuit Court that he forged checks from the account of the Hilltop Elementary School PTA to pay for car repairs and other personal expenses.Deputy State's Attorney William D. Roessler said that Nastasi was appointed treasurer of the PTA on Sept. 15, 1993, and that over the next six months he forged several checks under the name of the PTA president.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
Twenty-five parents delivered their budget message to the Baltimore County school board last night: more money to fix leaking roofs and broken boilers, clean dirty buildings, ease crowded classrooms and get more computers."
NEWS
October 15, 1993
The realm of the Parent-Teacher Association in Anne Arundel County is still largely ruled by women. In fact, 84 of the county's 100 PTAs are led by Female presidents.But lately more men are making inroads into local PTAs, both in Anne Arundel and throughout Maryland. In neighboring Howard County, for example, the number of male PTA presidents increased from six last year to eight this year, while the figure for other male officers jumped from 12 to 20.According to Anne Arundel PTA President Carolyn Roeding, the number of male presidents, officers and members has been on a steady incline since the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
Stacie L. Price, the former PTA president at Johnnycake Elementary School, was given a suspended three-year prison term Monday after being convicted of stealing more than $9,000 from the organization. Price was also fined $500 and ordered to pay court costs, and must serve three years of unsupervised probation. Prosecutor Michael S. Fuller had asked the judge to send the 39-year-old defendant to jail, saying she had violated a position of trust by writing checks to herself from the PTA's bank account over six months and stopped only "because she got caught.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Deborah A. Rice, a former software designer and volunteer, died Monday of head and neck cancer at her Timonium home. She was 42. Deborah A. Budacz, the daughter of a steamship executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1985, she earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Loyola College. Mrs. Rice went to work for Century Computing, a Laurel software development company, as a member of a team that developed software for certain control systems used on the NASA space shuttles.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
The former president of the Johnnycake Elementary School PTA was convicted this week of stealing more than $9,000 from the group's bank account for her personal use. Stacie L. Price, 39, who was forced to resign from the organization in April after admitting to the crime, waived a jury trial Thursday in Baltimore County Circuit Court and pleaded not guilty to a single theft-scheme count. Judge John J. Nagle III found her guilty and set sentencing for Dec. 2. Price faces a maximum of 10 years in prison, although prosecutor Michael S. Fuller said she is unlikely to spend time behind bars because she has no prior criminal record.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
The Maryland PTA has stripped the Baltimore City Council of PTAs of its authority to operate, amid concerns that the group's president is using his post as a platform to express personal criticism of city schools chief Andres Alonso. State PTA officials said the city group has been operating without two of the three required officers, a secretary and a treasurer. They are concerned that the president of the city's PTA council, Eric White, has been promoting his own views at forums where he's speaking in his official capacity.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
They're outsiders, and they know it. Just don't call them underdogs. In a crowded field of seven mayoral hopefuls, these five candidates are the ones sending an anti-establishment, down-with-the-status-quo message in criticizing the two frontrunners in the Baltimore mayor's race. None has garnered more than 5 percent support in either of two polls conducted for The Sun this summer, and their campaign coffers are tiny compared with those of the leading candidates, interim Mayor Sheila Dixon and Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. Still, they remain undaunted.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
A District Court judge denied a request yesterday from a former member of the PTA Council of Baltimore County to extend a temporary restraining order against the former president of the organization. Judge Alexandra N. Williams denied the petition after Roxanne Umphery-Lucas did not appear for the hearing in Towson. In her request for the temporary restraining order that was granted Jan. 19, Umphery-Lucas, 43, of Owings Mills accused former PTA Council President Michael C. Franklin of stalking and threatening her. She alleged that he slashed her car tires in May, threatened to burn down her house and committed "mail theft," court and police records show.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
The first national gathering of the organization known today as the PTA was convened in Washington 96 years ago as the National Congress of Mothers. While the group changed its name in 1924 to the National Congress of Parent-Teacher Associations -- the title it still carries -- PTAs remain widely perceived as the realm of moms.Factually, that's correct. Of the 105 officials on the PTA's national board, about 83 percent are women. The leadership figures for Maryland PTAs run along the same lines.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | September 17, 2006
Mary Jo Neil got involved in the PTA in 1997, when she became president of the organization at West Friendship Elementary School, where two of her three children were pupils. She learned there was an opening for president, and she went for it, she said, never bothering to start at a lower level and move up through the ranks. Now, Neil is president of the Maryland PTA, a statewide post that puts her at the helm of an organization with 214,000 members, one that works to improve the conditions of schools throughout the state.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.