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Psychosis

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
With all of the beeping of machines and checking of vital signs, patients in the intensive-care unit often have trouble sleeping. This, along with other hospital conditions, like lack of natural light and familiar surroundings, can lead to disorientation. It's called ICU psychosis, and while it's unsettling to patients and their families, it's not likely to last all that long, according to Dr. Chaitanya Ravi, director of LifeBridge Health Hospitalist Services. What is ICU psychosis and what are the main symptoms of it?
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ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It is impossible to avoid thinking about Sarah Kane's suicide by hanging in 1999 at the age of 28 when encountering the British playwright's final work, "4.48 Psychosis. " There's something at once real and surreal, disturbing and absorbing, about this roughly hour-long examination of mental illness, qualities that Iron Crow Theatre seizes upon in a darkly evocative production directed by Ryan Clark at Theatre Project. Kane's non-linear play is a kind of manic prose poem about people in various stages of mental illness; warnings and pleas seem to haunt every line.
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NEWS
November 1, 2013
Maryland's new Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness holds out the promise that for some people with mental illness — especially psychosis — early intervention may reduce the chance, already small, that they will become killers. Any reduction in the growing trend toward murder and mass murder in our country would be welcome. This plan is a refinement of an approach, long practiced though currently under attack, of early intervention and treatment, almost always with psychotropic drugs, of behavior that is diagnosed as "early onset" schizophrenia in children who have psychotic symptoms — usually, paranoia, delusions and hallucinations.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
With all of the beeping of machines and checking of vital signs, patients in the intensive-care unit often have trouble sleeping. This, along with other hospital conditions, like lack of natural light and familiar surroundings, can lead to disorientation. It's called ICU psychosis, and while it's unsettling to patients and their families, it's not likely to last all that long, according to Dr. Chaitanya Ravi, director of LifeBridge Health Hospitalist Services. What is ICU psychosis and what are the main symptoms of it?
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop
The Baltimore Sun
| August 20, 2013
I have to admit, I'm a little nervous as the rep from Janssen Pharmaceuticals steers me toward the Mindstorm "psychosis simulation" machine. She says I should experience both available videos to get a better sense of what a severe schizophrenic hallucination feels like, then plops me down in front of a silver suitcase.  It doesn't look like much: a laptop, a pair of headphones and a hand-held video viewer. The Mindstorm machine is here, at Towson University, so the campus police from nine state schools taking a day-long course in mental-illness recognition can feel it first-hand, albeit virtually.  Mental illnesses usually show themselves for the first time between the ages of 16 and 24, according to the National Association of Mental Illness, which means campus personnel, including police, need to be prepared to recognize and react to them.  The rep asks if I'm ready, then selects the first simulation.  A video begins to play.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2008
Doctors who watch for warning signs can often predict whether a teenager will develop schizophrenia or another psychotic illness, researchers in a government study reported yesterday. Teens who spend excessive time alone doing nothing, withdraw socially or who begin thinking that people are following them have a 35 percent risk of progressing to psychosis within 2 1/2 years, the researchers said. But the odds rise steeply - as high as 80 percent - for youths who display combinations of symptoms.
NEWS
By CAREY GOLDBERT and CAREY GOLDBERT,BOSTON GLOBE | January 27, 2006
Researchers are offering new ammunition to worried parents trying to dissuade their teens from smoking marijuana: Evidence is mounting that for some adolescents whose genes put them at added risk, heavy pot use could increase their chances of developing severe mental illness - psychosis or schizophrenia. This week, the pot-psychosis link gained ground when two major medical journals reviewed the research to date and concluded that it was persuasive. In PLoS Medicine, an Australian public health policy expert wrote that genetically vulnerable teens who smoke marijuana more than once a week "appear at greater risk of psychosis," while the British medical journal BMJ noted estimates that marijuana use could contribute to about 10 percent of cases of psychosis.
NEWS
By JAMIE TALAN | May 1, 2006
Scientists call it "psychosis in miniature" and have completed a study that suggests that treating young people with the earliest signs of schizophrenia may prevent or push back the mind-altering condition. But the study, published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, raises concern from some in the field about whether schizophrenia can be identified so early. The most severe form of mental illness, schizophrenia affects one in every 100 people. "While it would be great to find people at risk, you don't want to put people on these medicines if they don't need to be," said Dr. Daniel Weinberger, director of genes, cognition and psychosis at the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
I applaud Maryland's initiative to create a new center to identify and treat people with psychotic symptoms early in their illness ( "Mental illness and guns," Oct. 23). However, the current commitment laws in Maryland remain an impediment for a number of reasons. Some individuals with severe psychosis, for example, have a brain condition called anosognosia, which renders them unable to understand that they are ill and thus that they need treatment. That is why they often refuse treatment.
NEWS
February 12, 2011
Now that the smoke has cleared, the state of Montana voted Thursday to repeal the state's six year old medical marijuana law. According to Montana's House Speaker Mike Milburn, "we were duped" and "the law has been a pretext for encouraging recreational use and creating a path to full legalization of marijuana. " In addition, two new reports out this week clearly show that marijuana is not the safe and harmless drug that most people believe it to be. A new study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry shows that using marijuana may cause psychosis to develop sooner in patients already predisposed to developing it, and in other patients the drug may even cause psychosis.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Maryland's new Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness holds out the promise that for some people with mental illness — especially psychosis — early intervention may reduce the chance, already small, that they will become killers. Any reduction in the growing trend toward murder and mass murder in our country would be welcome. This plan is a refinement of an approach, long practiced though currently under attack, of early intervention and treatment, almost always with psychotropic drugs, of behavior that is diagnosed as "early onset" schizophrenia in children who have psychotic symptoms — usually, paranoia, delusions and hallucinations.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
I applaud Maryland's initiative to create a new center to identify and treat people with psychotic symptoms early in their illness ( "Mental illness and guns," Oct. 23). However, the current commitment laws in Maryland remain an impediment for a number of reasons. Some individuals with severe psychosis, for example, have a brain condition called anosognosia, which renders them unable to understand that they are ill and thus that they need treatment. That is why they often refuse treatment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop
The Baltimore Sun
| August 20, 2013
I have to admit, I'm a little nervous as the rep from Janssen Pharmaceuticals steers me toward the Mindstorm "psychosis simulation" machine. She says I should experience both available videos to get a better sense of what a severe schizophrenic hallucination feels like, then plops me down in front of a silver suitcase.  It doesn't look like much: a laptop, a pair of headphones and a hand-held video viewer. The Mindstorm machine is here, at Towson University, so the campus police from nine state schools taking a day-long course in mental-illness recognition can feel it first-hand, albeit virtually.  Mental illnesses usually show themselves for the first time between the ages of 16 and 24, according to the National Association of Mental Illness, which means campus personnel, including police, need to be prepared to recognize and react to them.  The rep asks if I'm ready, then selects the first simulation.  A video begins to play.
NEWS
February 12, 2011
Now that the smoke has cleared, the state of Montana voted Thursday to repeal the state's six year old medical marijuana law. According to Montana's House Speaker Mike Milburn, "we were duped" and "the law has been a pretext for encouraging recreational use and creating a path to full legalization of marijuana. " In addition, two new reports out this week clearly show that marijuana is not the safe and harmless drug that most people believe it to be. A new study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry shows that using marijuana may cause psychosis to develop sooner in patients already predisposed to developing it, and in other patients the drug may even cause psychosis.
NEWS
February 9, 2011
The article published today in "Health News" makes the claim that smoking marijuana is "linked" to early onset of mental illness. However, although the article implies some sort of cause and effect, that conclusion has no scientific basis. In fact, the authors of the study don't even bother investigating whether marijuana use causes mental illness or if people with mental illness have a higher rate of smoking marijuana than the general public. If marijuana caused mental illness, then cultures that have a higher rate of marijuana smoking than the U.S. should have a higher rate of mental illness.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2008
Doctors who watch for warning signs can often predict whether a teenager will develop schizophrenia or another psychotic illness, researchers in a government study reported yesterday. Teens who spend excessive time alone doing nothing, withdraw socially or who begin thinking that people are following them have a 35 percent risk of progressing to psychosis within 2 1/2 years, the researchers said. But the odds rise steeply - as high as 80 percent - for youths who display combinations of symptoms.
NEWS
February 9, 2011
The article published today in "Health News" makes the claim that smoking marijuana is "linked" to early onset of mental illness. However, although the article implies some sort of cause and effect, that conclusion has no scientific basis. In fact, the authors of the study don't even bother investigating whether marijuana use causes mental illness or if people with mental illness have a higher rate of smoking marijuana than the general public. If marijuana caused mental illness, then cultures that have a higher rate of marijuana smoking than the U.S. should have a higher rate of mental illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It is impossible to avoid thinking about Sarah Kane's suicide by hanging in 1999 at the age of 28 when encountering the British playwright's final work, "4.48 Psychosis. " There's something at once real and surreal, disturbing and absorbing, about this roughly hour-long examination of mental illness, qualities that Iron Crow Theatre seizes upon in a darkly evocative production directed by Ryan Clark at Theatre Project. Kane's non-linear play is a kind of manic prose poem about people in various stages of mental illness; warnings and pleas seem to haunt every line.
NEWS
By JAMIE TALAN | May 1, 2006
Scientists call it "psychosis in miniature" and have completed a study that suggests that treating young people with the earliest signs of schizophrenia may prevent or push back the mind-altering condition. But the study, published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, raises concern from some in the field about whether schizophrenia can be identified so early. The most severe form of mental illness, schizophrenia affects one in every 100 people. "While it would be great to find people at risk, you don't want to put people on these medicines if they don't need to be," said Dr. Daniel Weinberger, director of genes, cognition and psychosis at the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
By CAREY GOLDBERT and CAREY GOLDBERT,BOSTON GLOBE | January 27, 2006
Researchers are offering new ammunition to worried parents trying to dissuade their teens from smoking marijuana: Evidence is mounting that for some adolescents whose genes put them at added risk, heavy pot use could increase their chances of developing severe mental illness - psychosis or schizophrenia. This week, the pot-psychosis link gained ground when two major medical journals reviewed the research to date and concluded that it was persuasive. In PLoS Medicine, an Australian public health policy expert wrote that genetically vulnerable teens who smoke marijuana more than once a week "appear at greater risk of psychosis," while the British medical journal BMJ noted estimates that marijuana use could contribute to about 10 percent of cases of psychosis.
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