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NEWS
December 21, 1990
Joseph Zubin, 90, a psychological researcher who specialized instudies of schizophrenia, died Wednesday of heart failure at his home in Buffalo, N.Y.A Baltimore native and Johns Hopkins University graduate, Dr. Zubin recently moved to Buffalo from Pittsburgh, where he had been named a research career scientist at the Highland Drive Veterans Affairs Medical Center.He was given the titles of distinguished research professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Pittsburgh and Gregory Razan professor of psychology at Queens College of the City University of New York.
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NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 14, 2014
Domestic violence is an issue that has been on the minds of many people in recent days, prompted by the horrifying abuse committed by Ray Rice against his now-wife. His status as a professional football player, coupled with the fact that the attack was captured on video and has been seen by millions, has helped to shine a bright light on this often-neglected yet serious societal problem. Lesser known but not less tragic was the murder of Jessica Meredith Jacobsen, mother to two young boys, by her estranged husband exactly two years ago today in front of their Baltimore County home.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Henrietta E. Hestick, a practicing clinical psychologist specializing in developmental childhood and family issues who was also an associate professor at Baltimore City Community College, died Thursday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Windsor Mill resident was 66. Henrietta Eversley, whose parents were both African Methodist Episcopal ministers, was born and raised in Georgetown, Guyana. After graduating from high school in Georgetown, she taught elementary school from 1959 to 1970 in her hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Singer and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
For Tyler Glenn, frontman of the Provo, Utah-based pop-rock quartet Neon Trees, seeing a therapist was a breakthrough in more ways than one. “It was definitely a profound thing,” said Glenn recently on the phone from Minneapolis. “I found that it was OK to have anxiety and it was OK to have some of the feelings that I had about myself.” Glenn used his therapy sessions as a creative muse when he began writing songs for April's “Pop Psychology,” Neon Trees' third album, and the therapy gave him the confidence he needed to publicly come out as gay in “Rolling Stone” earlier this year.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
SPORTS
By Dr. Richard Hinton, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Over the past 50 years, we have gone from major league athletes with offseason jobs to young athletes with, often, no offseason at all, from parents sticking their heads out the back door to call their children home from play to parents rushing out the door for the next officially sanctioned event. Historically, children have played sports for fun, with the wonderful byproduct of learning life's lessons. Today, achievement in a single sport seems to be the increasing focus. Some parents are choosing year-round lacrosse-only participation for their children long before they have experienced a wide range of other activities.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Sue T. Brown, who served as executive director of the Maryland Psychological Association for nearly three decades, died July 10 of complications from metastatic melanoma at her Columbia home. She was 73. Sue Taylor was born in Seattle and raised in Portland, Ore., where she graduated in 1957 from Grant High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from the University of Oregon, and in 1963, a master's degree in psychology from the University of Iowa. After living in Dallas, she moved with her family to Takoma Park in 1972, and three years later, to Columbia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
Dr. James Carroll Tolan, a noted clinical psychologist whose field of expertise was working with patients with developmental disabilities, died Aug. 6 of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Reisterstown resident was 56. Born in Washington, Dr. Tolan was adopted as an infant and raised in Wayne, Pa. His adoptive father was in real estate sales, and his mother was a homemaker. As a young man, he dropped out of high school and later earned his General Educational Development certificate.
NEWS
February 29, 2004
Community college schedules series of talks on psychology The psychology program at Carroll Community College is presenting a free guest speaker series that is open to the public. The series is for those interested in psychology or a subfield, or in discovering how psychology relates to other fields. All lectures are from 12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. at the college's 1601 Washington Road campus in Westminster. Scheduled programs are: Thursday: Psychology Applied to Consumer Behavior by Nancy Kimble, Room M157-159.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandso and Robert A. Erlandso,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1991
Monday though Friday, Dr. Patricia Anne Outlaw, the cool dispassionate scientist, treats the troubled minds at Spring Grove State Hospital.But on Sunday, her exuberant other self emerges as the Rev. Patricia Outlaw takes to her tiny Monkton pulpit to exhort her 25-member African Methodist Episcopal flock to seek Christ's help to save their immortal souls."
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Rita Sloan Berndt, a neurology professor at the University of Maryland Medical School for 25 years who studied people who suffered from aphasia, the loss of the power to use or understand words, died June 17 of lymphoma at her home in Roland Park. She was 70. Sheila Blumstein, a professor of cognitive linguistics and psychological sciences at Brown University, called her colleague and friend a force in the fields of aphasia and neuroscience. "We have yet to truly understand aphasia and the reasons behind it, but we've come a long way, and Rita was part of the reason we've come a long way," Dr. Blumstein said.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
In 2006, the Baltimore funk-jam band Pigeons Playing Ping Pong started from a modest and typical beginning: Two new friends - Greg Ormont and Jeremy Schon - playing acoustic guitar together in a University of Maryland dorm room. The duo took their songs to coffee shops and open-mic nights around campus, and a year later, added drummer Dan Schwartz and bassist Ben Carrey to complete the act.  Since then, Pigeons have lived on the road (Ormont said the group played 196 shows in 2013)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
EXPLORE
September 23, 2013
WASHINGTON COLLEGE: Washington College in Chestertown has announced its dean's list for the spring 2013 semester. Dean's List students are recognized for their academic excellence and have achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the semester. Students include Courtney Agar of Bel Air, Class of 2015 business management major and psychology minor; Christopher Brown of Havre de Grace, Class of 2013 humanities major and Hispanic studies minor; Lillian Burril of Havre de Grace, Class of 2016 sociology major; James Comotto of Abingdon, Class of 2013 biology major and philosophy minor; Stephanie Davey of Abingdon, Class of 2015 Hispanic studies major; Emily Eline of Jarrettsville, Class of 2016; Gary Fenstamaker of Belcamp, Class of 2013 computer science and art major and mathematics minor; Laura Gettier of Forest Hill, Class of 2016; Laurel Jones of Forest Hill, Class of 2016 chemistry major; Zachary Leppert of Belcamp, Class of 2014 psychology major; Meredith O'Connell of Bel Air, Class of 2014 English major and creative writing minor; Suzanne Patinella of Fallston, Class of 2015 business management major; Matthew Ridge of Jarrettsville, Class of 2015 drama major; Alexandra Roemer of Pylesville, Class of 2015 biology major; Brooke Sanchez of Bel Air, Class of 2016 psychology major; Ceara Scanlon of Abingdon, Class of 2016 psychology major; Gabrielle Tarbert of Bel Air, Class of 2013 political science major; and Jillian Undem of Bel Air, Class of 2014 human development...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Sue T. Brown, who served as executive director of the Maryland Psychological Association for nearly three decades, died July 10 of complications from metastatic melanoma at her Columbia home. She was 73. Sue Taylor was born in Seattle and raised in Portland, Ore., where she graduated in 1957 from Grant High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from the University of Oregon, and in 1963, a master's degree in psychology from the University of Iowa. After living in Dallas, she moved with her family to Takoma Park in 1972, and three years later, to Columbia.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
EXPLORE
September 23, 2013
WASHINGTON COLLEGE: Washington College in Chestertown has announced its dean's list for the spring 2013 semester. Dean's List students are recognized for their academic excellence and have achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the semester. Students include Courtney Agar of Bel Air, Class of 2015 business management major and psychology minor; Christopher Brown of Havre de Grace, Class of 2013 humanities major and Hispanic studies minor; Lillian Burril of Havre de Grace, Class of 2016 sociology major; James Comotto of Abingdon, Class of 2013 biology major and philosophy minor; Stephanie Davey of Abingdon, Class of 2015 Hispanic studies major; Emily Eline of Jarrettsville, Class of 2016; Gary Fenstamaker of Belcamp, Class of 2013 computer science and art major and mathematics minor; Laura Gettier of Forest Hill, Class of 2016; Laurel Jones of Forest Hill, Class of 2016 chemistry major; Zachary Leppert of Belcamp, Class of 2014 psychology major; Meredith O'Connell of Bel Air, Class of 2014 English major and creative writing minor; Suzanne Patinella of Fallston, Class of 2015 business management major; Matthew Ridge of Jarrettsville, Class of 2015 drama major; Alexandra Roemer of Pylesville, Class of 2015 biology major; Brooke Sanchez of Bel Air, Class of 2016 psychology major; Ceara Scanlon of Abingdon, Class of 2016 psychology major; Gabrielle Tarbert of Bel Air, Class of 2013 political science major; and Jillian Undem of Bel Air, Class of 2014 human development...
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 15, 2011
Ravens coach John Harbaugh made it abundantly clear to reporters on Monday that he had no interest in talking about letdowns, psychology and the big picture. He just wanted to talk about football, which explains why he said "football" nine times in 30 seconds during his press conference. [ via Baltimore Sports Report ]
EXPLORE
February 27, 2013
Cheryl and Lambert Rickey of Aberdeen announce the engagement of their daughter ,Allison Marie, to Nicholas Rowan Delcher, son of William Delcher Sr. of Bel Air and Elizabeth and Steve Oster of Parkville. The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate of Aberdeen High School. She graduated from Harford Community College in 2010 with an associate's degree in psychology. Delcher is a 2000 graduate of Parkville High School. He graduated from Harford Community College in 2004, earning an electrical degree.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Adam Lankford thinks there's an oft-repeated misconception about suicide attackers that isn't merely wrong. It's potentially deadly. Lankford is the Baltimore-born terrorism expert who has just published a book titled "The Myth of Martyrdom: What Really Drives Suicide Bombers, Rampage Shooters, and Other Self-Destructive Killers. " The book, parts of which were written in Baltimore, deflates common assumptions about the psychology of those who claim they murder strangers to advance political goals.
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