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Psychoanalysis

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NEWS
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
Sigmund Freud's theory about the workings of the human mind, psychoanalysis, does not accommodate a friendly adversary. "You're either for us or against us," his champions cry. Yet, that's what I am. A friend, because I've admired the therapeutic skills of many analysts and have tried to promote what they do best; an adversary, because I believe that psychoanalysis promised more than it delivered to my discipline, psychiatry, and has encouraged a nihilistic outlook...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
John P. Gach, a bibliophile and a nationally known bookseller who specialized in rare books devoted to the human sciences, died of a heart attack Dec. 20 at his Randallstown home. He was 63. Mr. Gach, the son of a carpenter and a homemaker, was born in New York City and raised in Pikesville. After graduating from Loyola High School in 1964, he went to work as manager of Gordon's of Orleans Street, a now-closed Pikesville seafood house. In the late 1960s, when he wasn't busy selling crab cakes, Mr. Gach fancied himself a struggling poet.
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NEWS
November 17, 2006
Dr. William M. Goldstein, a psychiatrist who taught and wrote about his field, died of cancer yesterday at his Rockville home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Howard Park neighborhood, he was a 1960 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College in Ohio. He was a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Goldstein, who practiced in Chevy Chase for many years, joined the faculty of Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1975 and taught its psychiatric residents the principles of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
James Toback, the screenwriter of Bugsy and the writer-director of Black and White, made his reputation right out of Harvard College (Class of 1966) as a racy man of letters. He penned a notorious, Mailer-esque nonfiction book called Jim that centered as much on Jim Toback's drive to shed middle-class aspirations, angst and inhibition as it did on Jim Brown, the taboo-breaking black hero who was the book's main subject. No project pulls together all Toback's obsessions with as much focus and intensity as Tyson, his mesmerizing documentary about the fighter who made a label like "bad-boy boxer" come off as an understatement.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
TOUR DE FRANCE ON FILM -- Filmmaker and cyclist Scott Coady's The Tour Baby!, a firsthand, behind-the-scenes look at the world's most famous bicycle race, will be shown at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave., in the old Patterson Theatre. Tickets are $8, $6 for C.A. members, $5 if you arrive on a bike. Proceeds benefit The Lance Armstrong Foundation. Information: 410-276-1651 or creativealli ance.org. JEKYLL & HYDE --Victor Fleming's 1941 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring Spencer Tracy as a London physician who unwittingly invents a potion that unleashes his own dark side, will be next week's offering in the continuing Wednesday night film series at the St. Thomas Aquinas Church parish center, 37th Street and Roland Avenue.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
Mignon G. Eberhart,97, a romance and mystery writer whose career spanned 60 years, died Tuesday in Greenwich, Conn.She wrote 59 books, including her first mystery in 1929. She wrote her last, "Three Days for Emeralds," in 1988. Her Gothic romance mysteries have been translated into more than 20 languages. One of her recurring heroines was nurse-turned-sleuth Sarah Keate.Her second novel, "While the Patient Slept," won a 1930 Scotland Yard Prize of $5,000. Her novel "Fair Warning" was adapted for Broadway in 1941 and ran under the title "Eight O'Clock Tuesday."
NEWS
October 26, 2003
Earl Peyroux, 78, who was the host of more than 600 episodes of the Public Broadcasting Service Gourmet Cooking television show, died Thursday in Pensacola, Fla., after a prolonged illness. He was a culinary teacher at Pensacola Junior College when the campus public television station, WSRE, asked him to be host of a cooking show in 1977. "It lasted for 18 years, was picked up by PBS and shown coast to coast," said Jerry Gillmore, his longtime companion. "He was slightly overweight and looked like he enjoyed his food."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
James Toback, the screenwriter of Bugsy and the writer-director of Black and White, made his reputation right out of Harvard College (Class of 1966) as a racy man of letters. He penned a notorious, Mailer-esque nonfiction book called Jim that centered as much on Jim Toback's drive to shed middle-class aspirations, angst and inhibition as it did on Jim Brown, the taboo-breaking black hero who was the book's main subject. No project pulls together all Toback's obsessions with as much focus and intensity as Tyson, his mesmerizing documentary about the fighter who made a label like "bad-boy boxer" come off as an understatement.
NEWS
By Zofia Smardz | January 3, 1993
THE PURLOINED CLINIC.Janet Malcolm.Knopf.382 pages. $23.Most readers may recognize Janet Malcolm as the author of "The Journalist and the Murderer," her controversial denunciation journalistic hypocrisy built around "Fatal Vision," the Joe McGinniss book about convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald. Long before that work elevated her momentarily to the status of literary celebrity, however, Ms. Malcolm was known and admired among the cognoscenti for the elegant, erudite and provocative essays and criticism she has turned out over the years for the New Yorker and other choice publications.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 5, 1999
The Baltimore-Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis Inc. presents its 17th annual film and lecture series, "Close-Ups: Psychoanalysts Look at Film," starting tonight.The Institute will present "Dead Again," Kenneth Branagh's 1991 thriller starring Emma Thompson about a woman whose amnesia is connected to a murder mystery. Branagh stars as a detective who tries to help her. Dr. Everett Siegel will lead the discussion.The screening will be held at the Baltimore Museum of Art at 7: 30 p.m. Tickets may be purchased at the BMA box office during museum hours and beginning one hour before the screening.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Close-Ups: Psychoanalysts Look at Film," the 25th annual film and lecture series from the Baltimore Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis, opens tonight with Gavin Hood's Tsotsi (2006), an Oscar-winning South African film starring Presley Chweneyagae as a street tough who finds unsuspected levels of humanity within himself when he kills a woman and steals her car, only to find his victim's infant child in the back seat. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, with post-film discussion led by psychoanalyst Silvia Bell.
NEWS
November 17, 2006
Dr. William M. Goldstein, a psychiatrist who taught and wrote about his field, died of cancer yesterday at his Rockville home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Howard Park neighborhood, he was a 1960 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College in Ohio. He was a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Goldstein, who practiced in Chevy Chase for many years, joined the faculty of Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1975 and taught its psychiatric residents the principles of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
TOUR DE FRANCE ON FILM -- Filmmaker and cyclist Scott Coady's The Tour Baby!, a firsthand, behind-the-scenes look at the world's most famous bicycle race, will be shown at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave., in the old Patterson Theatre. Tickets are $8, $6 for C.A. members, $5 if you arrive on a bike. Proceeds benefit The Lance Armstrong Foundation. Information: 410-276-1651 or creativealli ance.org. JEKYLL & HYDE --Victor Fleming's 1941 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring Spencer Tracy as a London physician who unwittingly invents a potion that unleashes his own dark side, will be next week's offering in the continuing Wednesday night film series at the St. Thomas Aquinas Church parish center, 37th Street and Roland Avenue.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
Earl Peyroux, 78, who was the host of more than 600 episodes of the Public Broadcasting Service Gourmet Cooking television show, died Thursday in Pensacola, Fla., after a prolonged illness. He was a culinary teacher at Pensacola Junior College when the campus public television station, WSRE, asked him to be host of a cooking show in 1977. "It lasted for 18 years, was picked up by PBS and shown coast to coast," said Jerry Gillmore, his longtime companion. "He was slightly overweight and looked like he enjoyed his food."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Think Annie Hall without the wistfulness, and with Woody Allen playing not the main character but the main character's muse, and you have Anything Else, in which the Woodman tries adapting his theories about compatibility, companionship and angst for a new generation of filmgoers. In fact, so determined is Allen to expand beyond his shrinking core audience that his participation in the film, not to mention his authorship of it, is being calculatedly downplayed. The film is being marketed as a Jason Biggs-Christina Ricci movie, with Allen's name being featured nowhere prominently, his character not even being mentioned in the movie's press notes and stills of him from the movie rare, indeed (in fact, no clips featuring his character were made available to TV's Ebert & Roeper)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Lovelady and By Steve Lovelady,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
Soros: The Life and Times of a Messianic Billionaire, by Michael T. Kaufman. Alfred A. Knopf. 328 pages. $27.50. As the Enron Corp. unfolds before our astonished eyes as little more than a bubble of air and paper-shuffling that somehow made its way to No. 7 on Fortune magazine's list of the nation's 500 largest corporations ... and as Osama bin Laden, a child of enormous capitalist wealth, flits away from the combined forces and intelligence of Western...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Schlesinger and By Judith Schlesinger,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Traditional psychotherapy is dead -- at best, it's gasping on life support. The classic techniques of mental excavation, with their gradual building of trust between client and therapist, have gone the way of the rotary phone. Once common, the idea of being in therapy for years is now considered an inefficient indulgence reserved for those determined narcissists who can pay "out of pocket." Most people who need help get something brief, forced to settle for managed-care crumbs of three months or 10 sessions a year, if that much.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 18, 1996
It's easy to tell that actress Uta Hagen is an excellent teacher.She fervently imparts information and opinions on subjects ranging from theater as a religious vocation to blacklisting in the McCarthy era to psychoanalysis.Described in People magazine earlier this year as "arguably America's greatest living stage actress" and listed in a recent issue of Theater Week as one of the top 10 female stars of the year, Hagen, 77, has never become a household name, probably because she has shunned movies and favored the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Schlesinger and By Judith Schlesinger,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Traditional psychotherapy is dead -- at best, it's gasping on life support. The classic techniques of mental excavation, with their gradual building of trust between client and therapist, have gone the way of the rotary phone. Once common, the idea of being in therapy for years is now considered an inefficient indulgence reserved for those determined narcissists who can pay "out of pocket." Most people who need help get something brief, forced to settle for managed-care crumbs of three months or 10 sessions a year, if that much.
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