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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
K urt Glaser, a retired former associate professor of pediatrics and assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and former director of adolescent services at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville, died Nov. 13 of pancreatic cancer at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Pikesville resident, who had lived at the retirement community since 1993, was 94. Dr. Glaser, the son of a merchant and a homemaker, was born in Vienna, Austria, and raised in Innsbruck, Austria, where he was a graduate of the Bundesreal Gymnasium.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
Senseless and tragic. Alan Trimakas was a brilliant, compassionate medical student ( "In the light of judicial scrutiny, a dark memory," July 5). He would have been a great physician. When we had him while doing his psychiatry rotation as a junior medical student at the Phipps Clinic at Johns Hopkins University, we could see he had a very bright future. Problem was that he simply was trying to save some money by parking a distance from Hopkins and was at the wrong place at the wrong time.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey A. Schaler and Richard E. Vatz | October 9, 2012
Thomas Stephen Szasz, arguably the world's foremost psychiatrist, died Sept. 8. 2012. Former psychiatrist and current columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote that "Szasz is the kind of author no one reads but everyone knows about. " That's unfortunate. Too many mental health professionals haven't the foggiest idea who Thomas Szasz was and why he will remain important to fields of science, medicine, ethics, law — and particularly mental health — for centuries to come. Dr. Szasz, who received an honorary doctorate from Towson University in 1999, adopted the premises of Rudolf Virchow, the Austrian pathologist who defined disease consistent with all serious pathologists.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Dr. Carolyn R. Haynie, a psychiatrist whose work with underserved children in her hometown of Baltimore became the core of a regional practice, died May 12 of breast cancer . The Mount Washington resident was 65. Raised in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, Dr. Haynie would become the CEO of Urban Behavioral Associates, an Old Goucher psychiatric clinic for children, teens, adults and families. Those who knew Dr. Haynie said she was driven to extend the availability of treatment to children in low-income African-American families, a resource she believed was essential for young people to become successful adults.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
A memorial Mass for Dr. Jose D. Arana, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and clinical director of the Walter P. Carter Community Mental Health Center, will be offered at 5 p.m. tomorrow at the Roman Catholic Church of the Nativity, 1809 Vista Lane, Timonium.Dr. Arana, who was 52 and lived in Lutherville, died Feb. 3 after an apparent heart attack in Lima, Peru, where he was helping the Pan American Psychiatric Association evaluate mental health services.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
Dr. Jerome D. Frank, a retired John Hopkins professor of psychiatry who was widely known as an early and outspoken critic of nuclear weapons, died yesterday of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place, his home for the past nine years. He was 95. A New York City native educated at Harvard University and its medical school, Dr. Frank came to the Hopkins in 1940 as a junior assistant resident to study under Dr. Adolf Meyer, founder of its department of psychiatry. After several years, he became an Army psychiatrist and served with Hopkins physicians in the Pacific -- an experience that gave him insight into the psychological effects of war on the health and well-being of soldiers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
Dr. George Ulysses Balis, 68, who directed the psychiatric education of University of Maryland's medical students for many years, died of cancer Monday at that institution's hospital.The Greek-born physician, who began his teaching career at the medical school in 1966, was the author or editor of 11 books and numerous scholarly articles. Though he was a specialist in the field of eating disorders and depression, he was best known as an esteemed teacher."He had a strong speaking voice and was a passionate person.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
Dr. Russell R. Monroe, former chairman of the department of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who explored the relationship between madness and genius as well as raging electrical storms deep in the brain that trigger violence, died of pneumonia April 4 at his home in San Francisco. He was 82. "Russ was a scholar who was dedicated to the advancement of our knowledge of psychiatric illnesses," said Dr. Eugene B. Brody, former chairman of the UM psychiatry department, who was succeeded by Dr. Monroe in 1976.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
Dr. Frank J. Ayd Jr., a Baltimore psychiatrist who pioneered the field of psychopharmacology when he began treating schizophrenics with Thorazine in the early 1950s, died in his sleep Monday at Lorien Mays Chapel Health Care Center. He was 87. At a time when the psychiatric establishment rejected the notion that mental illness was rooted in biology, Dr. Ayd championed the use of medications to adjust brain chemistry and, in so doing, relieve a patient's suffering. "He was a biological psychiatrist, one of the important kinds of people who in spite of - and against - the establishment had the guts to stand up and really do things," said Dr. Thomas Ban, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1992
From the pompous Dr. Leo Marvin portrayed by Richard Dreyfuss in "What About Bob?" to the suave but murderous Dr. Hannibal Lecter in "The Silence of the Lambs," psychiatrists on film suffered from an image problem in 1991. Not the least of the notable doctors is Dr. Susan Lowenstein, the psychiatrist played by Barbra Streisand in "The Prince of Tides."In the film, based on a Pat Conroy novel, Dr. Lowenstein becomes romantically involved with Tom Wingo (Nick Nolte), a Southerner who comes to New York after his sister, Savannah (Melinda Dillon)
NEWS
By René J. Muller | June 18, 2013
Days before the official May 22 publication date of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-5), a number of psychiatrists who were closely associated with the project scrambled to do some preemptory damage control, mostly by lowering the expectations for what was to come. Michael B. First, professor of psychiatry at Columbia, acknowledged on NPR that there was still no empirical method to confirm or rule out any mental illness. "We were hoping and imagining that research would advance at a pace that laboratory tests would have come out. And here we are 20 years later and we still unfortunately rely primarily on symptoms to make our diagnoses.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
NEWS
By Jeffrey A. Schaler and Richard E. Vatz | October 9, 2012
Thomas Stephen Szasz, arguably the world's foremost psychiatrist, died Sept. 8. 2012. Former psychiatrist and current columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote that "Szasz is the kind of author no one reads but everyone knows about. " That's unfortunate. Too many mental health professionals haven't the foggiest idea who Thomas Szasz was and why he will remain important to fields of science, medicine, ethics, law — and particularly mental health — for centuries to come. Dr. Szasz, who received an honorary doctorate from Towson University in 1999, adopted the premises of Rudolf Virchow, the Austrian pathologist who defined disease consistent with all serious pathologists.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Dr. Michael Victor Edelstein, whose career at Sheppard Pratt Health System spanned nearly 30 years and whose hobbies were auto repair and listening to gospel music, died of a heart attack Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 66. Dr. Edelstein was on his way to work Monday morning when he was stricken. He was taken by medics to St. Joseph Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. "I've know Michael since I came to Sheppard Pratt in 1986, and he was one of the most remarkable doctors I've ever worked with," said Dr. Steve Sharfstein, Sheppard Pratt Health System president.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 13, 2011
Dr. James Patrick Connaughton, a psychiatrist who was the founder and first director of what became the Johns Hopkins Children and Adolescent Mental Health Center, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Cloisters home in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was 80. The son of a government worker and a shopkeeper, Dr. Connaughton was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from Rockwell College, a Tipperary boarding school, he entered University College in Dublin, where he earned his medical degree in 1956.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 26, 2011
Dr. Betty W. Robinson, a psychiatrist who had been director of inpatient services at the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore and an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died June 19 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Stoneleigh resident was 84. The daughter of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad office worker and a bookkeeper, Betty Lee Wilmas was born and raised in St. Louis, where she graduated in 1944 from Wills High School.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
Dr. Paul R. McHugh was in no mood for fake modesty, not with three days of ceremony and a seminar about to begin in his honor. So when someone casually asked the chief of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine how long a speech he was about to deliver, he had to laugh."
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