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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Dr. Stanley Roy Platman, a retired psychiatrist and health administrator recalled as a champion of community-based mental health services, died after heart surgery May 7 at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. The Guilford resident was 79. "Stanley would take on as patients human beings most others in his field would not," said Ellen Callegary, an attorney who represents clients with disabilities and lives in Baltimore. "He helped people with complex needs, including those with developmental disabilities and mental illnesses.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
An addiction rehabilitation psychiatrist with a history of treatment for alcohol and drug abuse was among those charged Wednesday with manufacturing and distributing the drug Ecstasy at a Towson home. Dr. Priscilla W. Sheldon-Cost, 51, and her boyfriend, Thomas Ronald Joyave, 52, of the 700 block of Walker Ave. are both charged with five counts of narcotics offenses, including manufacturing and possessing drugs with the intent to distribute them, Baltimore County police said. Vincent Mark Ricker, 24, of the 7700 block of Fairgreen Road faces the same charges.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 1, 2010
Dr. James Jaquet Gibbs, a retired Sheppard Pratt psychiatrist who founded its children's and adolescents' program, died of a stroke Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 86 and lived in Oakcrest Village in Parkville. Born and raised in Naperville, Ill., he was a graduate of Naperville High School. During World War II, he was assigned by the Army to take courses at Texas Agriculture and Mining University, Stanford University and Grinnell College. He earned a medical degree from Wayne State University in Detroit.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Dr. Carolyn R. Haynie, a psychiatrist whose work with underserved children in her hometown of Baltimore became the core of a regional practice, died May 12 of breast cancer . The Mount Washington resident was 65. Raised in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, Dr. Haynie would become the CEO of Urban Behavioral Associates, an Old Goucher psychiatric clinic for children, teens, adults and families. Those who knew Dr. Haynie said she was driven to extend the availability of treatment to children in low-income African-American families, a resource she believed was essential for young people to become successful adults.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Dr. Ghislaine D. "Ghilly" Godenne, a psychiatrist and a Belgian baroness who was the founder of the Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later was director of Johns Hopkins University Counseling and Psychiatric Services, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Roland Park Place. She was 89. Ghislaine Andree Flore Dudley Godenne was born the fourth of seven children in Brussels, Belgium. She was the daughter of a Belgian orthopedic surgeon and a British Red Cross volunteer who met at a French hospital during World War I and married the day the war ended.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Dr. Edward Lawrence Suarez-Murias, a retired psychiatrist and World War II veteran, died of pneumonia July 2 at his Roland Park home. He was 96. Named a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, he practiced in Baltimore for more than 40 years. A family biography said he was born in Havana, Cuba, to Marguerite Suarez-Murias y Vendel of Brussels, Belgium, and Eduardo Ramon Suarez-Murias, a Havana resident. He attended grade school in Waterloo, Belgium, and in the public school system of Los Angeles, where his father, a mining engineer, settled the family.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and James Drew and Meredith Cohn and James Drew,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | November 19, 2009
The Towson psychiatrist whose license was suspended early this month after he was accused of improper conduct with boys he was treating faced the state board that oversees doctors Wednesday in a hearing. The closed-door hearing was a chance for Miguel Frontera to provide information to the Maryland Board of Physicians, which will decide whether to permanently revoke or reinstate his license. Frontera arrived with his lawyer, Natalie Magdeburger, who declined to comment. The outcome of the hearing was unclear, though Frontera has the right to request another hearing.
HEALTH
By Gordon Livingston and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2010
T he relationships between psychiatrists and the people who seek our help are necessarily one-sided. While we know many of the intimate details of our patients' lives, they typically know about us only what we choose to tell them - usually very little. In the absence of personal information, people make assumptions about what their doctors' lives are like. Seeking reassurance that the person treating them has some special expertise in the universal struggle to live a controlled and happy life, it is common for patients to assume that their psychiatrist is not plagued by the same difficulties that they are. These assumptions are frequently inaccurate.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Dr. Carolyn R. Haynie, a psychiatrist whose work with underserved children in her hometown of Baltimore became the core of a regional practice, died May 12 of breast cancer . The Mount Washington resident was 65. Raised in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, Dr. Haynie would become the CEO of Urban Behavioral Associates, an Old Goucher psychiatric clinic for children, teens, adults and families. Those who knew Dr. Haynie said she was driven to extend the availability of treatment to children in low-income African-American families, a resource she believed was essential for young people to become successful adults.
NEWS
April 29, 1991
Services for Dr. Dennis Tyson Jones, a Baltimore psychiatrist and assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Mount View Cemetery in West Friendship, Howard County.Dr. Jones, who practiced psychiatry in Baltimore for 30 years and served as a consultant to hospitals, businesses and government agencies, died of cancer Friday at his Ruxton home. He was 62.Born in Wilson, N.C., he graduated from Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem in 1950.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Dr. Ghislaine D. "Ghilly" Godenne, a psychiatrist and a Belgian baroness who was the founder of the Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later was director of Johns Hopkins University Counseling and Psychiatric Services, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Roland Park Place. She was 89. Ghislaine Andree Flore Dudley Godenne was born the fourth of seven children in Brussels, Belgium. She was the daughter of a Belgian orthopedic surgeon and a British Red Cross volunteer who met at a French hospital during World War I and married the day the war ended.
NEWS
By Dinah Miller | February 11, 2013
In December, a young man in Newtown, Conn., killed 20 small children and seven adults, including his mother, and then committed suicide. This tragic massacre has prompted legislators to reexamine firearms laws and quickly propose legislation that might prevent future mass murders. Much of it focuses on people who have sought mental health care. The Maryland General Assembly is considering legislation that requires mental health clinicians to report patients who are potentially dangerous for the purpose of restricting their access to guns.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
NEWS
By Mark S. Komrad | December 18, 2012
Though none of us yet knows much of Adam Lanza's backstory, it doesn't take a mental health professional to suspect that a man who killed his mother before killing so many children and adults was likely suffering from a severe mental disorder. Although mental illness very rarely results in violence, let alone such heinous behavior, the fact is that so many of those who could benefit from state-of-the-art treatment do not receive it, for a variety of reasons. For example, some fear the implications of facing a condition that might limit the power of will to control thoughts, feelings or behaviors.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
The former commander of the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., told a military court on Tuesday that accused WikiLeaker Bradley Manning was held in highly restrictive "prevention-of-injury" custody even though psychiatrists recommended the conditions be eased. Retired Marine Col. Daniel J. Choike told the court at Fort Meade that he agreed with the staff of the brig at Quantico that Manning should be kept on prevention-of-injury status based on his history, the seriousness of the charges against him and what he called his "erratic behavior.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 6, 1992
Dr. John M. Hamilton, a Columbia psychiatrist who admitted to having a sexual affair with a female patient, has resigned his position as deputy medical director of the American Psychiatric Association.His resignation yesterday came two days after a state disciplinary panel placed him on probation for five years and forbade him from treating patients for at least a year. The state Board of Physician Quality Assurance called his conduct "unethical" and a violation of state law.Under a consent decree with the state board, the psychiatrist waived his right to a hearing and admitted to having the affair.
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