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NEWS
By William Conrad Nowels | April 7, 1992
THE CURRENT debate over whether the likeness on the new Elvis Presley postage stamp should be the young Rockabilly Elvis or the older Las Vegas Elvis comes in a presidential election year. It also comes just as I have finished setting down on paper the memoirs (kept secret these past two decades) of a lady from Capitol Hill about her 2 1/2 -year love affair with The King.These apparently disparate events actually offer an opportunity for reflection on similarities between the now-mythic Elvis and the American psyche as revealed in the current national malaise.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
A psychiatric patient in Cumberland faces attempted-murder charges in connection with the stabbing of a medical center staff member in the head. Craig Harris Zello, 50, of Hagerstown has been charged with first- and second-degree attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment and weapons violation charges in the incident at the Thomas B. Finan Hospital Center, according to Maryland State Police. Authorities say the victim, a registered nurse whose name was not released, was trying to restrain a combative Zello on Monday morning when Zello stuck him in the head with a 7-inch galvanized spike.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 24, 1993
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- One by one, manager Johnny Oates summoned his relievers. He had promised "nothing earth-shattering" the night before, but now he was demoting his closer. Nothing earth-shattering? Gregg Olson was near tears.Meetings, maneuverings, misty eyes, all because of a silly rule. Chicago Tribune columnist Jerome Holtzman invented the save with the best of intentions -- to recognize the performance of late-inning relievers. Little did he realize he was creating a statistical monster that would grow out of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
With courage and determination and more than a little bit of moxie, Adelle Waldman set out to crack the code. For her debut novel, a modern-day comedy of manners called "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P," the Baltimore-raised author decided to explore - and expose - the thinking of the kind of guy that she and her friends used to date. Nate is a rising star on the New York literary scene, fueled by insecurity and arrogance. He's a serial dater who justifies dumping his girlfriend a few days after she'd had an abortion by reassuring himself "that he was not the kind of guy who disappeared after sleeping with a woman - and certainly not after the condom broke.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Ann LoLordo | November 15, 1991
And so the news came from City Hall: fewer workers, fewer libraries, fewer firehouses and fewer school days for Baltimore. The sweeping budget cuts may not be fatal to urban life. But they surely are another assault on the city's spirit.Not so long ago, City Hall joyously preached "Baltimore Is Best" until many citizens found themselves believing it. Now, Baltimoreans find themselves listening to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke lecturing on the politics of downsizing, of streamlining, of making do with less.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The last person you may ever want to spend an evening with is Jeffrey Dahmer, the serial killer of boys and young men. Although the world learned what went on behind the door of Apt. 213 on N. 25th St. in Milwaukee after a would-be victim escaped in 1991, no one has ever really learned what went on in Dahmer's head. Joseph W. Ritsch, co-founder of the recently formed Iron Crow Theatre, has attempted to peer into that psyche. His new play, "Apartment 213," is an absorbing, if not entirely satisfying, work.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
The anointing of that gray-haired, white-soul balladeer as the latest "American Idol" last week was either the choosing of the next great American pop superstar, the end of civilization as we know it, a harmless diversion from the big problems of the day, or some mixture of all of the above. Whatever. In any case, the popularity of this Fox TV show is endlessly dissected for clues about the state of American society as it embarks on the 21st century. Relax. It needn't be. Consider that Fox was breathlessly touting that the viewers for the show topped - 35 million!
SPORTS
December 3, 2006
Good morning --New York Giants-- For the sake of your team psyche, it would be wise not to remember the Titans.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | November 4, 1990
This year marks the 30th anniversary of Richard and Ilene Pacun's fruitful partnership, both in marriage and in business. So much a team are they that even their company's name, Richilene, is a combination of their own first names.Both students of the human psyche -- she was a social worker, he a psychology major -- they met through a mutual friend in Florida 30 years ago and were wed at a "double white wedding" six weeks later, Mr. Pacun relates with fondness.Such effortless, storybook romance seems to inspire much of the evening wear for which they are famous.
SPORTS
January 26, 2006
"I thought it was cheap. I thought he went low at the knees. ... But he didn't have to go low. He's known for that. He's a cheap-shot artist." Lindy Ruff Buffalo Sabres coach, on a hit by Rangers defenseman Darius Kasparaitis on Tim Connolly in Tuesday's game "Ninety-nine times out of 100, show me a so-called defensive stopper and I'll show you someone who can't shoot. (The 100th guy is named Michael Jordan.)" Bob Ryan Boston Globe columnist "The Super Bowl has long been a symbol of gluttony, but the coupling of its decadence with Detroit's careworn psyche makes for an awkward juxtaposition: gilded supersizing on an industrial landscape of downsizing."
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Carl Edgell doesn't enjoy going to the hospital. But he doesn't want to hurt anyone, either. The 44-year-old homeless man has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. At times when he has felt that he has reached a breaking point, he has taken himself to a local emergency room. Each time, he says, the experience has been different. When he has been referred to a psychiatric unit, he says, he has found the physicians and nurses "compassionate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Talk about a TV series keeping current with the news. Thirty seconds into the Season 2 opener of Showtime's “Homeland,” viewers see the first image of an American embassy under attack in the Middle East. At just over two minutes into the episode, American and Israeli flags are burned as U.S. officials are threatened by an angry mob surrounding the embassy compound. It's our embassy in Beirut, not the consulate in Benghazi, that's under attack. And the reason for the mob in “Homeland” is an Israeli bombing of Iranian nuclear reactors - not a film that offended Muslims or a targeted attack, depending on which administration official you are listening to at any given moment.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 23, 2012
LaQuan Williams followed a still-developing rookie campaign in which he caught four passes for 46 yards with a solid preseason in which he made six grabs for 76 yards and one touchdown and appeared poised to be the Ravens' No. 4 wide receiver. But the former Poly and University of Maryland product has been deactivated for each of the Ravens' first two contests in 2012, forced to watch from the sideline as fellow-second-year veteran Tandon Doss has become the No. 4 wideout. If Williams is disappointed by the inactivity, he's not showing it. “There's no frustration,” he said after Friday's practice.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
A friend of mine who used to work for another airline likes to make snide comments when I say something about flying Southwest, referring to their seating policy as "cattle call. " But after flying without the kids this past weekend -- and preparing to fly with them in a few weeks -- I made some observations (purely unscientific, of course) and decided that I much prefer flying with open seating when I've got the kids. Here's my psychoanalysis of the situation. As a parent flying with kids, I feel it's my responsibility to get checked in as soon as possible, so I can get us on the plane as quickly as possible so that our fellow passengers can decide for themselves whether they want to sit by us. (Since Southwest does family boarding after the A group, I endeavor to be as early in the A group as possible.)
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 14, 2011
The late FBI director J. Edgar Hoover would have hated director Clint Eastwood's new movie about him, but audiences are likely to be intrigued by it. Although "J. Edgar" does not realize its full dramatic potential, it's an ambitious attempt to get inside the mind of a man for whom secrecy was a professional attribute. During his long career, Eastwood's strength as a director has been his adherence to straightforward, deliberately paced storytelling that encourages actors to develop their characters in an incremental fashion.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
Well, that was different. It's not every day that the Mid-Atlantic experiences a magnitude 5.8 earthquake, but that 10 seconds of shake, rattle and roll you felt this afternoon wasn't a train, a hurricane or the sound of budget negotiations in Washington. It was the real thing. By the standards of earthquake hotspots around the world, a 5.8 is a minor amusement. The earthquake that rocked Japan this year hit 9.0, meaning it released about 63,000 times as much energy. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, there are about 1,300 earthquakes a year worldwide that register between 5.0 and 5.9. The agency tracks about 50 earthquakes a day. For the East Coast, though, 5.8 was enough to overload telephone networks and send crowds pouring into the streets for fear that office buildings were in danger of imminent collapse.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 24, 2006
President Bush said Monday that the Iraq war is "straining the psyche of our country." What country is he talking about? The United States? If that's what the president thinks, he ought to get out of the house a little more. Unless you're in the military, or related to someone who is, the only strain you're feeling from this war is - what? - the price of gasoline maybe? We have a great divide in this country - between the military culture and the civilian culture, and it has never been more pronounced than it is right now. If the war has affected anyone's psyche in this country, it's the thousands of troops we've sent to Iraq and to Afghanistan - and the Marines who will be forced into active duty again, some of them after multiple tours.
NEWS
By Nancy Sylvester | December 22, 1999
THIS holiday season is preparing us to enter a new century. It is a time for reflection on who we are as a nation, what we stand for as a people and how we want to shape the century to come.It is a time when we are challenged to become our best selves. So I am saddened when I experience the holiday season only reinforcing our identity as consumers.There has been a shift in our sense of self. Prior to the 1980s, most of us would probably have identified ourselves as citizens. We felt responsible for the welfare of each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The last person you may ever want to spend an evening with is Jeffrey Dahmer, the serial killer of boys and young men. Although the world learned what went on behind the door of Apt. 213 on N. 25th St. in Milwaukee after a would-be victim escaped in 1991, no one has ever really learned what went on in Dahmer's head. Joseph W. Ritsch, co-founder of the recently formed Iron Crow Theatre, has attempted to peer into that psyche. His new play, "Apartment 213," is an absorbing, if not entirely satisfying, work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Haga, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
The general consensus among aspiring musicians is that major-label record deals are a very good thing. The New York-based psychedelic-pop band MGMT, which headlines Merriweather Post Pavilion on Saturday night, has to be one of the few acts whose members have tried to talk a corporation out of signing them. "We went into [our A&R person's] office, and we were completely in disbelief that anyone would want to sign our band," says 27-year-old Ben Goldwasser, MGMT's keyboardist and one of its principals, along with vocalist/guitarist Andrew VanWyngarden.
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