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Pseudoephedrine

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NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 27, 2006
Now that it's harder to get decongestants containing pseudoephedrine, will cold and allergy sufferers have to make do with weaker over-the-counter drugs? That depends. As of Sept. 30, the effective date of an amendment to the U.S. Patriot Act, nasal products containing pseudoephedrine must be sold "behind the counter," which means the purchaser has to show a photo ID and sign a log book to get them. The idea is to make it harder for illegal drug suppliers to make methamphetamine from pseudoephedrine, though whether the new law will do so is an open question.
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 27, 2006
Now that it's harder to get decongestants containing pseudoephedrine, will cold and allergy sufferers have to make do with weaker over-the-counter drugs? That depends. As of Sept. 30, the effective date of an amendment to the U.S. Patriot Act, nasal products containing pseudoephedrine must be sold "behind the counter," which means the purchaser has to show a photo ID and sign a log book to get them. The idea is to make it harder for illegal drug suppliers to make methamphetamine from pseudoephedrine, though whether the new law will do so is an open question.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 3, 2005
I would like to point out a side effect of allergy medications that contain pseudoephedrine for nasal decongestion. Taking Claritin D left me completely unable to fall asleep. I was literally up all night with a racing heartbeat. I was so sleep-deprived that I couldn't work. I finally read the warning about nervousness, dizziness or sleeplessness. I called my doctor, who said I should switch to plain Claritin (without a decongestant). On this drug, I sleep like a baby. I urge anyone with insomnia to check all medications for pseudoephedrine.
NEWS
April 11, 2006
Apair of Indiana college students and their teen-aged companion drove to Maryland last month to stock up on cold pills they could resell at a tidy profit. Indiana is one of 35 states that have imposed limits on the sale of over-the-counter medicines used to produce a cheap version of the highly addictive crystal meth. So over spring break, the young entrepreneurs headed here, using a global positioning device to locate retailers who they thought would have unprotected stashes of pseudoephedrine and allergy medication.
NEWS
January 24, 2006
The nation's growing methamphetamine use is certainly a problem. It's a highly addictive, brain-damaging stimulant that's been rising in popularity among teenagers and others, particularly in the West and Midwest. In Maryland, law enforcement officials are aware of the threat - and have periodically uncovered small-scale meth labs. As local public health threats go, this makes methamphetamines a cause for concern but hardly a crisis. With that in mind, it's difficult not to see the latest proposal kicking around the General Assembly - to significantly restrict over-the-counter sales of cold medicines like Sudafed that contain pseudoephedrine - as an overreaction and an under-solution.
NEWS
April 11, 2006
Apair of Indiana college students and their teen-aged companion drove to Maryland last month to stock up on cold pills they could resell at a tidy profit. Indiana is one of 35 states that have imposed limits on the sale of over-the-counter medicines used to produce a cheap version of the highly addictive crystal meth. So over spring break, the young entrepreneurs headed here, using a global positioning device to locate retailers who they thought would have unprotected stashes of pseudoephedrine and allergy medication.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 2005
ST. PAUL, Minn. - Faced with a growing crisis of methamphetamine addiction and toxic spills from homemade drug laboratories, 20 states are considering legislation that would impose tight restrictions on common cold medicines that contain pseudoephedrine, an essential ingredient in making methamphetamine. Although the bills vary in detail, most would classify pseudoephedrine as a controlled substance and would allow sales of products containing it, like Sudafed, only in pharmacies, not in grocery or convenience stores.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2005
When Donna Bigler bought cold medicine this winter at a CVS Pharmacy in Silver Spring, she unwittingly crossed a line in the war on drugs. Bigler didn't know whether her sniffling college-age daughter preferred regular or non-drowsy TheraFlu, so she attempted to buy both. A CVS clerk said something about a new store policy, then asked her to choose one or the other, Bigler recalled. In a strategy similar to conventional warfare, police, businesses and lawmakers from Oregon to Maryland are looking for ways to cut off the supply line to an illicit drug made from products bought legally off store shelves.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
Do cold medications cause prostate problems? No. But pseudoephedrine, which is ubiquitous in decongestant cold remedies, may bring undetected prostate problems to light. Usually, these problems -- chiefly trouble with urination due to an enlarged prostate -- go away when the medication is stopped. Virtually all men develop an enlarged prostate as they age, which makes them urinate more frequently, but is not an indication of cancer. Pseudoephedrine acts on molecules in muscles and blood vessels: In the nose, it constricts tiny blood vessels and dries up nasal secretions.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 10, 2002
Q. My 3-year-old and my 6-year-old keep trading colds. It seems as if we have had nonstop sniffles all winter. I never know which cold medicine is right for children this age. Is there anything that's really effective? A. No. Most cold medicines are designed for adults and haven't been tested thoroughly in children. The antihistamines that are common ingredients in cold remedies make many adults sleepy but can sometimes stimulate children and keep them awake. Decongestants such as pseudoephedrine can also make kids jumpy.
NEWS
January 24, 2006
The nation's growing methamphetamine use is certainly a problem. It's a highly addictive, brain-damaging stimulant that's been rising in popularity among teenagers and others, particularly in the West and Midwest. In Maryland, law enforcement officials are aware of the threat - and have periodically uncovered small-scale meth labs. As local public health threats go, this makes methamphetamines a cause for concern but hardly a crisis. With that in mind, it's difficult not to see the latest proposal kicking around the General Assembly - to significantly restrict over-the-counter sales of cold medicines like Sudafed that contain pseudoephedrine - as an overreaction and an under-solution.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 3, 2005
I would like to point out a side effect of allergy medications that contain pseudoephedrine for nasal decongestion. Taking Claritin D left me completely unable to fall asleep. I was literally up all night with a racing heartbeat. I was so sleep-deprived that I couldn't work. I finally read the warning about nervousness, dizziness or sleeplessness. I called my doctor, who said I should switch to plain Claritin (without a decongestant). On this drug, I sleep like a baby. I urge anyone with insomnia to check all medications for pseudoephedrine.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2005
When Donna Bigler bought cold medicine this winter at a CVS Pharmacy in Silver Spring, she unwittingly crossed a line in the war on drugs. Bigler didn't know whether her sniffling college-age daughter preferred regular or non-drowsy TheraFlu, so she attempted to buy both. A CVS clerk said something about a new store policy, then asked her to choose one or the other, Bigler recalled. In a strategy similar to conventional warfare, police, businesses and lawmakers from Oregon to Maryland are looking for ways to cut off the supply line to an illicit drug made from products bought legally off store shelves.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 2005
ST. PAUL, Minn. - Faced with a growing crisis of methamphetamine addiction and toxic spills from homemade drug laboratories, 20 states are considering legislation that would impose tight restrictions on common cold medicines that contain pseudoephedrine, an essential ingredient in making methamphetamine. Although the bills vary in detail, most would classify pseudoephedrine as a controlled substance and would allow sales of products containing it, like Sudafed, only in pharmacies, not in grocery or convenience stores.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
Q. I read the article about using catnip as a mosquito repellent. Will merely planting catnip around the house ward off mosquitoes? Or is it necessary to crush the leaves, releasing the plants' oils? Given the situation with West Nile virus, it would be wonderful if using catnip as a foliage planting could create a safer zone around our homes. A. The ingredient in catnip that appears to have mosquito-repellent properties is nepetalactone. To activate the compound you have to crush the leaves and release the volatile oil. Just planting catnip around your house is unlikely to afford any protection from mosquitoes.
SPORTS
January 29, 1998
Days until opening ceremonies: 9.Snowfall: One-third of an inch in Nagano City, no new snow on men's downhill course. That left 7 inches in Nagano City, and 6 feet, 6 1/2 inches on the downhill course.Update: Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler Akebono will perform a traditional rite of purification at the opening ceremonies. Akebono, a naturalized Japanese citizen, holds sumo's highest rank of grand champion. The other grand champion, Takanohana, had been cast for the part, but bowed out because of illness.
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