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By Thomas G. Ford Extension Service horticulture consultant | October 13, 1991
Last month's gardening supplement to the Carroll County Sun contained conflicting information regarding the fertilization of trees and shrubs in the fall.The University of Maryland Cooperative ExtensionService's research has shown that fall fertilization does not increase the risk of winter injury, nor does it cause plants to grow longerinto the winter season.Most horticulturists concur that nutritionally-stressed plants are more likely to be injured by freezing temperatures than plants fertilized in the fall.
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FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2005
Last week I felt stinging on my arm while I was pruning and realized I brushed against a caterpillar. It reminded me of a weird Scottie dog, brown with fuzzy "ears" at both ends, green in the middle with one neat brown spot. The sting hurt like the dickens, until I put the old baking soda-water home remedy on it. What was that caterpillar? The saddleback caterpillar is the larval form of a common East Coast moth. Eggs are laid in clutches, and initially caterpillars can be gregarious, feeding in groups.
FEATURES
February 9, 2008
I'm thinking about ordering Mason bees to pollinate my fruit trees to replace the honeybees that are dying. Is this a good idea? Winter is the time to order Mason bees. Orchard Mason Bees are native, solitary bees, slightly smaller than honeybees, shiny and dark blue in color. They are very efficient pollinators of fruit crops such as apples, pears, cherries and plums. They have a reputation for being friendly, nonaggressive bees but will sting if they or their nest are threatened. Buying the bees does not guarantee that they will stay in your orchard.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Daily Press | March 14, 2004
Growing roses can be an intimidating experience, especially for a new gardener. Roses are often regarded as fussy plants that need too much time and too many chemicals to keep them blemish free and full of beautiful blooms. That long-held notion is changing. An evolving new collection -- New Generation Roses by Jackson & Perkins -- makes it easier to enjoy almost-perfect roses. "They're bred to be simpler to grow," says Mike Cady, a horticulturist with Jackson & Perkins. The new roses grow on their own roots, not grafted onto the rootstock of other plants.
NEWS
By Rene' J. Muller | January 10, 2007
Trees charm our city, purify our air and remind us that even in a landscape of concrete and asphalt, we are part of the natural world. They deserve to be treated well. But in Baltimore, trees are not treated well. I recently came upon a Baltimore Gas and Electric crew pruning a row of 16 Japanese Zelkova trees that were growing on the west side of Roland Avenue south of 40th Street. Clearly, BGE had felt threatened by these Zelkovas: The crew was hacking away at each tree, from one end of the row to the other, until a large, V-shaped space was created around the wires that passed through them.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | May 30, 2006
After years of enduring the hard knocks of city life - from encroaching development to approaching dogs - a lone city tree in Northeast Baltimore struck back against humanity one windy night in January and wrecked a car. The otherwise benign maple made its move about 9 p.m., as Henry Thomas Jr. relaxed in front of the TV with his wife. Thomas heard a crash outside, peered through the window and saw a huge branch in the driveway next to his month-old Chrysler C300. "We heard this boom and I was like, `Whoa,'" said Thomas, who is 57 and lives in Woodbourne Heights.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
State lawmakers plan to look into the tree-trimming practices of Maryland's utilities to see whether the companies are doing enough to prevent lengthy and widespread power outages during severe storms. In a first step in reviewing the utilities' response to Tropical Storm Isabel, which left more than a million Marylanderswithout power, two legislative panels heard testimony about the outages yesterday from the power companies, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Potomac Electric Power Co. Members of the Senate Finance and House Economic Matters committees said they thought the utility crews had done a good job under the circumstances in restoring power in about eight days.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
After weeks of agonizing discussion, St. John's College officials decided yesterday to take down the school's wind-damaged 400-year-old Liberty Tree, the last of the original 13 under which colonists gathered to kindle revolutionary fervor in the 1770s.St. John's officials had been debating the fate of the historic tree on the college's front lawn since Hurricane Floyd blew through town last month, ripping a 15-foot-long crack in its trunk and weakening a large branch that leaned precariously toward a dormitory.
NEWS
By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing writer | February 10, 1991
Picture yourself in the classroom again, blank notebook page in hand, debating whether to raise your hand and ask a question or wait and hope that someone else will do it.Remember?If you are at all interested in learning a little or a lot about gardening, now is the optimum time and best place to do it.This winter and spring hold some wonderful opportunities to get some horticulture education, perhaps meet new gardening friends and to ask all the questions you want -- at little or no cost.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | February 9, 2005
CHICAGO - Listening to liberals and conservatives bicker about Social Security is like hearing someone talk about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Their perceptions are so different that it's hard to remember they are both talking about the same thing. Liberals see it as a sacred social welfare program that shields the elderly and therefore must be protected at all costs. Conservatives see it as a grossly overstretched entitlement that punishes the young and thus needs to be fundamentally reshaped.
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