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By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Daily Press | March 14, 2004
Growing roses can be an intimidating experience, especially for a new gardener. Roses are often regarded as fussy plants that need too much time and too many chemicals to keep them blemish free and full of beautiful blooms. That long-held notion is changing. An evolving new collection -- New Generation Roses by Jackson & Perkins -- makes it easier to enjoy almost-perfect roses. "They're bred to be simpler to grow," says Mike Cady, a horticulturist with Jackson & Perkins. The new roses grow on their own roots, not grafted onto the rootstock of other plants.
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NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | July 4, 2004
What happened to the trees? It looks like they're all dying. What's going on? The cicadas may be gone, but we'll see their impact all summer. The "flagging" injury you're seeing -- lots of dead twigs at the ends of branches -- resulted from the millions of small slits made by females for depositing their tiny white eggs. This disrupted the vascular system of the twigs, preventing water and nutrients from reaching the ends of branches. Although the results can look alarming, usually it amounts to no more than a benign tip pruning by Mother Nature.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 10, 2004
My youngest child has left for college and friends keep asking how things are in the empty nest, and I tell them that my garden is getting better every day. My flowerbeds had been on their own this summer. There had been the illness and death of my children's grandmother, and their departures for college had turned my house for weeks into what looked like the staging area for a military campaign. I vaguely remember sprinkling some coffee grounds around the roses in early June, but nothing after that.
NEWS
By Rene' J. Muller | January 10, 2007
Trees charm our city, purify our air and remind us that even in a landscape of concrete and asphalt, we are part of the natural world. They deserve to be treated well. But in Baltimore, trees are not treated well. I recently came upon a Baltimore Gas and Electric crew pruning a row of 16 Japanese Zelkova trees that were growing on the west side of Roland Avenue south of 40th Street. Clearly, BGE had felt threatened by these Zelkovas: The crew was hacking away at each tree, from one end of the row to the other, until a large, V-shaped space was created around the wires that passed through them.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2002
Like divas of the plant world, roses conjure up both lust and despair. No other flower can claim to have made so many swoon. Or to have left so many with a shelf full of chemicals in the garage and sulking plants in the garden. If you've been turned off by the labor-intensive regimen of roses in the past -- the spraying, the bugs and the black spot -- you'll be heartened to learn that new, improved varieties today make roses more of a friend than foe. "Nobody should waste their time spraying roses," says Frank Gouin, professor emeritus of horticulture and landscape architecture at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Like the Liberty apple, Asian pears show great promise for Maryland homeowners who want to grow backyard fruit with a minimum of pesticides.Familiar varieties of pears -- like Bartlett and Bosc -- require fewer applications of pesticides than do most apples, said Dr. Christopher S. Walsh, fruits specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service University of Maryland System.But Asian pears require even less spraying. Since their attractive, ornamental foliage is not subject to disease pressures, no spraying is required until the trees start bearing.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | May 30, 2006
After years of enduring the hard knocks of city life - from encroaching development to approaching dogs - a lone city tree in Northeast Baltimore struck back against humanity one windy night in January and wrecked a car. The otherwise benign maple made its move about 9 p.m., as Henry Thomas Jr. relaxed in front of the TV with his wife. Thomas heard a crash outside, peered through the window and saw a huge branch in the driveway next to his month-old Chrysler C300. "We heard this boom and I was like, `Whoa,'" said Thomas, who is 57 and lives in Woodbourne Heights.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
After weeks of agonizing discussion, St. John's College officials decided yesterday to take down the school's wind-damaged 400-year-old Liberty Tree, the last of the original 13 under which colonists gathered to kindle revolutionary fervor in the 1770s.St. John's officials had been debating the fate of the historic tree on the college's front lawn since Hurricane Floyd blew through town last month, ripping a 15-foot-long crack in its trunk and weakening a large branch that leaned precariously toward a dormitory.
NEWS
By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing writer | February 10, 1991
Picture yourself in the classroom again, blank notebook page in hand, debating whether to raise your hand and ask a question or wait and hope that someone else will do it.Remember?If you are at all interested in learning a little or a lot about gardening, now is the optimum time and best place to do it.This winter and spring hold some wonderful opportunities to get some horticulture education, perhaps meet new gardening friends and to ask all the questions you want -- at little or no cost.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | February 9, 2005
CHICAGO - Listening to liberals and conservatives bicker about Social Security is like hearing someone talk about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Their perceptions are so different that it's hard to remember they are both talking about the same thing. Liberals see it as a sacred social welfare program that shields the elderly and therefore must be protected at all costs. Conservatives see it as a grossly overstretched entitlement that punishes the young and thus needs to be fundamentally reshaped.
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