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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Greg Romano | March 18, 2004
Stars at Hood Hood College welcomes stargazers to its Frederick campus this spring. Each Wednesday evening through May 5, astronomy lecturer Ken Howard will answer guests' questions as they view stars and planets from the Williams Observatory's telescope. Visiting hours for this event are 8:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Hood College is at 401 Rosemont Ave., Frederick. Call 301-696-3679 or visit www. hood.edu. Tea from scratch Brew your own tea Saturday and Sunday at the Marshy Point Nature Center.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | March 24, 2007
I have to rethink my garden because of deer damage. What shrubs won't deer eat? There are no guarantees. Where deer populations are very high, they eat just about anything. Usually American holly, osmanthus, viburnums, caryopteris, rose of Sharon, butterfly bush, sweet box, Oregon grape holly, red osier dogwood and boxwood are reliable survivors. Many plants do well once they're established, if protected by fencing or repellents when small and tender. Resist planting barberry or other nonnative invasive plants.
FEATURES
February 9, 2008
I'm thinking about ordering Mason bees to pollinate my fruit trees to replace the honeybees that are dying. Is this a good idea? Winter is the time to order Mason bees. Orchard Mason Bees are native, solitary bees, slightly smaller than honeybees, shiny and dark blue in color. They are very efficient pollinators of fruit crops such as apples, pears, cherries and plums. They have a reputation for being friendly, nonaggressive bees but will sting if they or their nest are threatened. Buying the bees does not guarantee that they will stay in your orchard.
NEWS
By Rene' J. Muller | January 10, 2007
Trees charm our city, purify our air and remind us that even in a landscape of concrete and asphalt, we are part of the natural world. They deserve to be treated well. But in Baltimore, trees are not treated well. I recently came upon a Baltimore Gas and Electric crew pruning a row of 16 Japanese Zelkova trees that were growing on the west side of Roland Avenue south of 40th Street. Clearly, BGE had felt threatened by these Zelkovas: The crew was hacking away at each tree, from one end of the row to the other, until a large, V-shaped space was created around the wires that passed through them.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2002
Like divas of the plant world, roses conjure up both lust and despair. No other flower can claim to have made so many swoon. Or to have left so many with a shelf full of chemicals in the garage and sulking plants in the garden. If you've been turned off by the labor-intensive regimen of roses in the past -- the spraying, the bugs and the black spot -- you'll be heartened to learn that new, improved varieties today make roses more of a friend than foe. "Nobody should waste their time spraying roses," says Frank Gouin, professor emeritus of horticulture and landscape architecture at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
January 1, 1995
Emu Speculation Will Never FlyFortunately, the eagerness of emu investors to get the emu onto the slaughterhouse floor flies in the face of reality ("Emu farming begins to take off," The Sun, Dec. 12).As the American Veterinary Medical Association and other analysts have pointed out, the emu business is a pyramid structure consisting almost entirely of speculation in breeding stock.When this pyramid collapses, thousands of investors will lose their fortunes and thousands of emus will be killed to cut losses, since virtually no progress has been made toward actually developing a consumer market for emu, ostrich or any other flesh derived from the ratites, or flightless fowl.
NEWS
September 28, 1992
Hampstead council passes tree ordinanceThe Hampstead Town Council last Monday night unanimously passed the Hampstead tree ordinance, which provides for the creation of a tree committee and the adoption of a town tree plan.The action makes Hampstead eligible to be classified as a Tree City USA. This makes it possible for the town to receive federal money for tree planting and other landscaping.This plan lists the approved kinds of trees that can be planted along roadsides and requires the use of licensed professional tree experts in pruning.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Like the Liberty apple, Asian pears show great promise for Maryland homeowners who want to grow backyard fruit with a minimum of pesticides.Familiar varieties of pears -- like Bartlett and Bosc -- require fewer applications of pesticides than do most apples, said Dr. Christopher S. Walsh, fruits specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service University of Maryland System.But Asian pears require even less spraying. Since their attractive, ornamental foliage is not subject to disease pressures, no spraying is required until the trees start bearing.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
State lawmakers plan to look into the tree-trimming practices of Maryland's utilities to see whether the companies are doing enough to prevent lengthy and widespread power outages during severe storms. In a first step in reviewing the utilities' response to Tropical Storm Isabel, which left more than a million Marylanderswithout power, two legislative panels heard testimony about the outages yesterday from the power companies, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Potomac Electric Power Co. Members of the Senate Finance and House Economic Matters committees said they thought the utility crews had done a good job under the circumstances in restoring power in about eight days.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
After weeks of agonizing discussion, St. John's College officials decided yesterday to take down the school's wind-damaged 400-year-old Liberty Tree, the last of the original 13 under which colonists gathered to kindle revolutionary fervor in the 1770s.St. John's officials had been debating the fate of the historic tree on the college's front lawn since Hurricane Floyd blew through town last month, ripping a 15-foot-long crack in its trunk and weakening a large branch that leaned precariously toward a dormitory.
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