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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Greg Romano | March 18, 2004
Stars at Hood Hood College welcomes stargazers to its Frederick campus this spring. Each Wednesday evening through May 5, astronomy lecturer Ken Howard will answer guests' questions as they view stars and planets from the Williams Observatory's telescope. Visiting hours for this event are 8:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Hood College is at 401 Rosemont Ave., Frederick. Call 301-696-3679 or visit www. hood.edu. Tea from scratch Brew your own tea Saturday and Sunday at the Marshy Point Nature Center.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | March 24, 2007
I have to rethink my garden because of deer damage. What shrubs won't deer eat? There are no guarantees. Where deer populations are very high, they eat just about anything. Usually American holly, osmanthus, viburnums, caryopteris, rose of Sharon, butterfly bush, sweet box, Oregon grape holly, red osier dogwood and boxwood are reliable survivors. Many plants do well once they're established, if protected by fencing or repellents when small and tender. Resist planting barberry or other nonnative invasive plants.
NEWS
January 1, 1995
Emu Speculation Will Never FlyFortunately, the eagerness of emu investors to get the emu onto the slaughterhouse floor flies in the face of reality ("Emu farming begins to take off," The Sun, Dec. 12).As the American Veterinary Medical Association and other analysts have pointed out, the emu business is a pyramid structure consisting almost entirely of speculation in breeding stock.When this pyramid collapses, thousands of investors will lose their fortunes and thousands of emus will be killed to cut losses, since virtually no progress has been made toward actually developing a consumer market for emu, ostrich or any other flesh derived from the ratites, or flightless fowl.
NEWS
September 28, 1992
Hampstead council passes tree ordinanceThe Hampstead Town Council last Monday night unanimously passed the Hampstead tree ordinance, which provides for the creation of a tree committee and the adoption of a town tree plan.The action makes Hampstead eligible to be classified as a Tree City USA. This makes it possible for the town to receive federal money for tree planting and other landscaping.This plan lists the approved kinds of trees that can be planted along roadsides and requires the use of licensed professional tree experts in pruning.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
THE ISSUE: Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. continues its extensive tree-cutting program along 9 miles of Route 140 from Finksburg to Westminster. The utility says it must comply with new standards developed by the North American Electric Reliability Council. Although residents concede that the utility can deal with trees in its rights of way, they say the company has changed its approach from trimming and pruning to eliminating trees. YOUR VIEW: Should BGE take a different tactic and try to save trees that are not an immediate problem to its power lines?
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
It can be argued -- as novelist Jay McInerney did in his wine column in a recent issue of House & Garden magazine -- that the cocktail hour is the brash American equivalent of British teatime. While there's much to be said for a martini, there's also a great deal in favor of tea -- the accoutrements are so charmingly traditional, for instance: teapots, tea cups and saucers, silver spoons and tiny tea napkins. Unless you're one of 71 artists in the "100 Teapots" show at Baltimore Clayworks (through Feb. 24)
NEWS
By Thomas G. Ford Extension Service horticulture consultant | October 13, 1991
Last month's gardening supplement to the Carroll County Sun contained conflicting information regarding the fertilization of trees and shrubs in the fall.The University of Maryland Cooperative ExtensionService's research has shown that fall fertilization does not increase the risk of winter injury, nor does it cause plants to grow longerinto the winter season.Most horticulturists concur that nutritionally-stressed plants are more likely to be injured by freezing temperatures than plants fertilized in the fall.
FEATURES
February 9, 2008
I'm thinking about ordering Mason bees to pollinate my fruit trees to replace the honeybees that are dying. Is this a good idea? Winter is the time to order Mason bees. Orchard Mason Bees are native, solitary bees, slightly smaller than honeybees, shiny and dark blue in color. They are very efficient pollinators of fruit crops such as apples, pears, cherries and plums. They have a reputation for being friendly, nonaggressive bees but will sting if they or their nest are threatened. Buying the bees does not guarantee that they will stay in your orchard.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Daily Press | March 14, 2004
Growing roses can be an intimidating experience, especially for a new gardener. Roses are often regarded as fussy plants that need too much time and too many chemicals to keep them blemish free and full of beautiful blooms. That long-held notion is changing. An evolving new collection -- New Generation Roses by Jackson & Perkins -- makes it easier to enjoy almost-perfect roses. "They're bred to be simpler to grow," says Mike Cady, a horticulturist with Jackson & Perkins. The new roses grow on their own roots, not grafted onto the rootstock of other plants.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2005
Last week I felt stinging on my arm while I was pruning and realized I brushed against a caterpillar. It reminded me of a weird Scottie dog, brown with fuzzy "ears" at both ends, green in the middle with one neat brown spot. The sting hurt like the dickens, until I put the old baking soda-water home remedy on it. What was that caterpillar? The saddleback caterpillar is the larval form of a common East Coast moth. Eggs are laid in clutches, and initially caterpillars can be gregarious, feeding in groups.
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