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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
A man who supposedly played checkers in the Anne Arundel County jail with Dean L. Prue Jr. is expected to testify today that DTC Prue is the man who admitted to him shooting a liquor store owner to death last year.Raymond R. Rivera, 28, of Glen Burnie, who is awaiting trial on attempted murder, robbery and other charges, did not know Prue by name, according to prosecution arguments, only by a nickname and by sight.He picked Prue's photo from an array of pictures, prosecutors say, but Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Martin A. Wolff ruled the photo identification inadmissible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011
When Everyman Theatre was founded in 1990, the resident company included Kyle Prue, who went on to perform in two dozen works over the years. But in 2006, he moved from being in front of the spotlights to making sure the spotlights and everything else at Everyman functioned smoothly, as the company's production manager. Prue had a practical reason for taking that job. "I have a wife and family," he said. "I wanted a little more of a steady paycheck, something 52 weeks a year, instead of nine- or 10-week chunks.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Michelle Wong contributed to this article | July 23, 1997
A county detention center inmate nicknamed "Dread" admitted during a jail-house conversation that he shot up Tom's Liquors in Odenton in August and would have shot more if he hadn't run out of bullets, Raymond R. Rivera testified yesterday.The owner of the store died in the hail of bullets and his wife and two others were wounded.Rivera, a convicted robber who is awaiting trial on charges of robbery, kidnapping and first-degree assault in a separate case, pointed from the witness stand at Dean L. Prue Jr. as the man he knew as "Dread."
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 22, 2006
It's sometimes said that everyone has a double. But what if you found out you also had a triple, or a quadruple? Or, for that matter, what if there were 20 of you? These are among the questions raised by British playwright Caryl Churchill's elliptical drama A Number, receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre. In A Number, a grown son discovers that he has at least 20 clones. Then he discovers that he is a clone -- that his father had his original son cloned, then raised the clone instead.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
With an accusing gesture, Gail Couture identified Dean L. Prue Jr. in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday as the man who pumped two gunshots into her husband as the couple sat in a van near an Odenton liquor store last summer.Prue is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of Thomas Sung Hall, 63, who was shot Aug. 31 in his Tom's Liquors and Korean Restaurant in Odenton. He is also charged with assault with intent to murder in the shooting of three other people.But a second witness, Couture's teen-age son, who was also in the van that night, said he was "almost positive" but not quite that Prue was the man he saw outside Tom's.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1997
Dean Lamont Prue Jr. leaped from his seat during the first day of his murder trial yesterday and demanded a new lawyer.During the damaging testimony of a friend, Prue called out to Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Martin A. Wolff, "I don't want him as my lawyer anymore."Prue, 26, insisted that assistant public defender Rodney Warren had lied to him, which Warren vigorously denied. Then, as Prue was declaring that he would prefer no attorney to representation by someone he couldn't trust, a young woman seated in the courtroom near his parents began calling out to him, "Dean!
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1996
Due to inaccurate information provided by police, an article Saturday about the arrest of an Anne Arundel County man wanted in the slaying of an Odenton liquor store owner listed an out-of-date address. The last address of Dean Lamont Prue Jr. is the 8300 block of Timberlake Court, Severn.The Sun regrets the errors.A Fort Meade man wanted in the slaying of Odenton liquor store owner Thomas Sung Hall was arrested in Texas early yesterday by U.S. marshals, ending a three-week search.Dean Lamont Prue, Jr. 26, of the 3500 block of Endl Court was being held in the Galveston County jail awaiting an extradition hearing.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
An Anne Arundel County jury convicted Dean L. Prue Jr. yesterday of murdering an Odenton liquor store owner and wounding three other people, as the victims and their families listened sadly in the Circuit Court room.Prue showed no emotion as the jurors pronounced him guilty of 13 charges, though an unidentified woman sitting near Prue's father sobbed softly.Prosecutors said they will ask that Prue, 26, be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole at a hearing set for mid-September.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
The man convicted of killing an Odenton shopkeeper and shooting three others in an attempted robbery drew a prison term of life plus 20 years yesterday.The sentence disappointed both the victims' families and the defendant's lawyer.The families had hoped that Dean L. Prue Jr., 23, would be given a sentence of life without parole, sought by prosecutor Frank Ragione. Rodney Warren, Prue's lawyer, had asked for a sentence near the 25-year minimum listed in sentencing guidelines.The sentence imposed by Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Martin A. Wolff leaves it possible Prue could be paroled, but his first parole review probably would not occur for at least 17 years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Tyco International Ltd.'s auditors knew about millions of dollars in bonuses that former Chief Executive Officer L. Dennis Kozlowski was later accused of stealing, a witness at his fraud trial testified yesterday. Patricia Prue, Tyco's former head of human resources, told jurors in a New York state court that the company's payroll and legal departments also knew about the payments, which were rewards to employees for their work on the public offering of shares in Tyco subsidiary TyCom Inc. The testimony supports the contention of lawyers defending Kozlowski and former finance chief Mark H. Swartz that their clients didn't keep the bonuses secret and that the company's board knew of or could have learned about the payments.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Tyco International Ltd.'s auditors knew about millions of dollars in bonuses that former Chief Executive Officer L. Dennis Kozlowski was later accused of stealing, a witness at his fraud trial testified yesterday. Patricia Prue, Tyco's former head of human resources, told jurors in a New York state court that the company's payroll and legal departments also knew about the payments, which were rewards to employees for their work on the public offering of shares in Tyco subsidiary TyCom Inc. The testimony supports the contention of lawyers defending Kozlowski and former finance chief Mark H. Swartz that their clients didn't keep the bonuses secret and that the company's board knew of or could have learned about the payments.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2001
CHOPTANK -- Connie Coughenour-Prue just could not bring herself to let go of her family's country store. In the 20-by-30-foot riverside grocery, her parents have served the 90 or so residents of this tiny Caroline County village since 1946. And she's helped out since she "was old enough to count pennies." So when her mother -- known to everyone around as Miss Audrey -- finally decided on retirement last spring at age 87, Coughenour-Prue gave up her 35-year career as a sales representative for an Easton lithographic equipment company to take over the place.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 16, 2000
Dressed in the pea jacket of a merchant sailor, with his navy knit cap pulled down over his forehead, a severe-looking Kyle Prue makes his entrances exuding anger as the narrator in Everyman Theatre's production of "The Glass Menagerie." Prue's seething portrayal is the most distinctive feature of director Donald Hicken's basically solid production. The stand-in for playwright Tennessee Williams in his self-described 1944 "memory play," the narrator, who shares Williams' given name of Tom, is often played wistfully, even elegiacally.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
The man convicted of killing an Odenton shopkeeper and shooting three others in an attempted robbery drew a prison term of life plus 20 years yesterday.The sentence disappointed both the victims' families and the defendant's lawyer.The families had hoped that Dean L. Prue Jr., 23, would be given a sentence of life without parole, sought by prosecutor Frank Ragione. Rodney Warren, Prue's lawyer, had asked for a sentence near the 25-year minimum listed in sentencing guidelines.The sentence imposed by Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Martin A. Wolff leaves it possible Prue could be paroled, but his first parole review probably would not occur for at least 17 years.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
An Anne Arundel County jury convicted Dean L. Prue Jr. yesterday of murdering an Odenton liquor store owner and wounding three other people, as the victims and their families listened sadly in the Circuit Court room.Prue showed no emotion as the jurors pronounced him guilty of 13 charges, though an unidentified woman sitting near Prue's father sobbed softly.Prosecutors said they will ask that Prue, 26, be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole at a hearing set for mid-September.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Michelle Wong contributed to this article | July 23, 1997
A county detention center inmate nicknamed "Dread" admitted during a jail-house conversation that he shot up Tom's Liquors in Odenton in August and would have shot more if he hadn't run out of bullets, Raymond R. Rivera testified yesterday.The owner of the store died in the hail of bullets and his wife and two others were wounded.Rivera, a convicted robber who is awaiting trial on charges of robbery, kidnapping and first-degree assault in a separate case, pointed from the witness stand at Dean L. Prue Jr. as the man he knew as "Dread."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
County police released yesterday a photograph of Dean Lamont Prue Jr., 26, who has been charged in a criminal warrant with fatally shooting an Odenton liquor store owner and wounding his wife and two others last August.Police said Prue also is wanted in Anne Arundel for failure to appear on traffic charges and in Howard County on drug charges.His last known address was in the 3500 block of Endel Court at Fort Meade, but he has been known to frequent the Baltimore and Landover areas, police said.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2001
CHOPTANK -- Connie Coughenour-Prue just could not bring herself to let go of her family's country store. In the 20-by-30-foot riverside grocery, her parents have served the 90 or so residents of this tiny Caroline County village since 1946. And she's helped out since she "was old enough to count pennies." So when her mother -- known to everyone around as Miss Audrey -- finally decided on retirement last spring at age 87, Coughenour-Prue gave up her 35-year career as a sales representative for an Easton lithographic equipment company to take over the place.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
A man who supposedly played checkers in the Anne Arundel County jail with Dean L. Prue Jr. is expected to testify today that DTC Prue is the man who admitted to him shooting a liquor store owner to death last year.Raymond R. Rivera, 28, of Glen Burnie, who is awaiting trial on attempted murder, robbery and other charges, did not know Prue by name, according to prosecution arguments, only by a nickname and by sight.He picked Prue's photo from an array of pictures, prosecutors say, but Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Martin A. Wolff ruled the photo identification inadmissible.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
With an accusing gesture, Gail Couture identified Dean L. Prue Jr. in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday as the man who pumped two gunshots into her husband as the couple sat in a van near an Odenton liquor store last summer.Prue is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of Thomas Sung Hall, 63, who was shot Aug. 31 in his Tom's Liquors and Korean Restaurant in Odenton. He is also charged with assault with intent to murder in the shooting of three other people.But a second witness, Couture's teen-age son, who was also in the van that night, said he was "almost positive" but not quite that Prue was the man he saw outside Tom's.
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