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NEWS
February 21, 1991
What we have in President Bush's long-awaited energy program is a failure to communicate. His Energy Department conducted hearings in 48 states, in 18 months talking to 448 witnesses and poring over 200,000 pages of documents. What was said, by witnesses and members of Congress on both sides of the partisan aisle, convinced some Bush aides that conservation and environmental concerns had reached high status on the public's agenda. Energy Secretary James Watkins, nobody's description of a card-carrying Green, included several major energy-saving plans in his recommendations, but (and here's the disconnect)
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NEWS
By SAM HOWE VERHOVEK and SAM HOWE VERHOVEK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
DEADHORSE, Alaska -- Hard by the Beaufort Sea, in 30-degree windchill and surrounded by an otherworldly tableau of bright orange natural gas flares, caribou herds and wisps of arctic fog, Kemp Copeland wants everyone to know that he's working as fast as he can. As field operations manager at BP Exploration Alaska's vast oil complex here, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle on the northern edge of Alaska, the 45-year-old Texas native oversees repairs to...
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NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 29, 2001
PRUDHOE BAY, Alaska - For three decades, this place has been all about oil, an eerie-looking industrial complex of wells, rigs, turbine engines, trucks and worker camps plunked down in the middle of nowhere, all feeding the trans-Alaska pipeline, which has carried 13 billion barrels of crude to market since 1977 and transformed Alaska into a modern society. Natural gas was discovered in abundance here while companies were drilling for oil, but much of it has been injected back into the ground for later use because there was no way to get it to market.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 29, 2001
PRUDHOE BAY, Alaska - For three decades, this place has been all about oil, an eerie-looking industrial complex of wells, rigs, turbine engines, trucks and worker camps plunked down in the middle of nowhere, all feeding the trans-Alaska pipeline, which has carried 13 billion barrels of crude to market since 1977 and transformed Alaska into a modern society. Natural gas was discovered in abundance here while companies were drilling for oil, but much of it has been injected back into the ground for later use because there was no way to get it to market.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 2001
ALPINE FIELD, Alaska - Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang. It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.
NEWS
By SAM HOWE VERHOVEK and SAM HOWE VERHOVEK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
DEADHORSE, Alaska -- Hard by the Beaufort Sea, in 30-degree windchill and surrounded by an otherworldly tableau of bright orange natural gas flares, caribou herds and wisps of arctic fog, Kemp Copeland wants everyone to know that he's working as fast as he can. As field operations manager at BP Exploration Alaska's vast oil complex here, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle on the northern edge of Alaska, the 45-year-old Texas native oversees repairs to...
NEWS
December 25, 1995
Yule greetings in many waysMerry Christmas to all the government workers and their families who have been gifted with a pink slip.Merry Christmas to all the taxpayers who had scheduled visits to the nation's capital, national parks and institutions this season.Merry Christmas to all senior citizens whose life savings are in investments.And finally, Merry Christmas to President Clinton and Sen. Bob Dole. Your gifts may be delayed until next November.Joanne NugentCatonsvilleLife-saving quotationsRichard O'Mara, in the Dec. 16 Sun, gave us a most heart-warming story about John Young, sexton at First Unitarian Church.
NEWS
December 8, 2007
ROBERT ANDERSON, 90 Oil executive Robert O. Anderson, whose two-decade tenure as chief executive officer of Atlantic Richfield Co. included the discovery of North America's largest oil field, died Sunday at his home in Roswell, N.M., his family said. Mr. Anderson graduated from the University of Chicago in 1939 and went on to work for the American Mineral Spirits Co. He later purchased a small oil refinery in southeastern New Mexico and bought and expanded several other refineries. He served as chief executive officer of Atlantic Richfield for 17 years and was chairman of the board for 21 years.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush may veto energy legislation unless it carries his controversial proposal to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas exploration, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told a Senate energy committee hearing yesterday.Mr. Watkins also released a government study that concluded that the Trans Alaska Pipeline System probably would have to shut down after 18 years unless the potentially large oil and gas fields of the wildlife refuge -- Alaska's last unexploited wilderness -- were opened to drilling within several years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 30, 1999
LONDON -- BP Amoco PLC, the world's third-largest publicly traded oil company, said yesterday that it is negotiating to buy Atlantic Richfield Co. BP Amoco may pay as much as $25 billion in stock, a person familiar with the talks said.An announcement may come this week after the boards meet, the source said. BP Amoco and Arco jointly confirmed that negotiations are under way.The oil industry has been consolidating as it struggles with oil prices that fell by a third last year. A combined BP Amoco and Arco, the No. 8 U.S. oil company, could slash costs to blunt declining production at Alaska's Prudhoe Bay, the largest North American oil field.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 2001
ALPINE FIELD, Alaska - Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang. It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.
NEWS
December 25, 1995
Yule greetings in many waysMerry Christmas to all the government workers and their families who have been gifted with a pink slip.Merry Christmas to all the taxpayers who had scheduled visits to the nation's capital, national parks and institutions this season.Merry Christmas to all senior citizens whose life savings are in investments.And finally, Merry Christmas to President Clinton and Sen. Bob Dole. Your gifts may be delayed until next November.Joanne NugentCatonsvilleLife-saving quotationsRichard O'Mara, in the Dec. 16 Sun, gave us a most heart-warming story about John Young, sexton at First Unitarian Church.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
What we have in President Bush's long-awaited energy program is a failure to communicate. His Energy Department conducted hearings in 48 states, in 18 months talking to 448 witnesses and poring over 200,000 pages of documents. What was said, by witnesses and members of Congress on both sides of the partisan aisle, convinced some Bush aides that conservation and environmental concerns had reached high status on the public's agenda. Energy Secretary James Watkins, nobody's description of a card-carrying Green, included several major energy-saving plans in his recommendations, but (and here's the disconnect)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1992
TOKYO -- Russia granted a Japanese-U.S. consortium yesterday the right to explore what are believed to be huge reserves of oil and gas just off Sakhalin Island, in what may be one of the biggest and, for the Japanese, politically most important business deals since the dissolution of the Soviet Union.The $8 billion to $10 billion project will be conducted by Mitsui Corp., a giant Japanese trading concern; Marathon Oil Co., which is owned by USX Corp., and McDermott International Inc., a leader in the construction of oil platforms.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
The world oil market's increasing skittishness in the face of disasters and war was exposed anew yesterday after BP PLC announced that it was shutting down a key Alaskan oil field, possibly for weeks or months, because of pipeline corrosion. Oil prices soared $2.22, or 3 percent, to $76.98 a barrel as the BP news added to market jitters over continued fighting in the Middle East and myriad other threats to world supplies, which have been stretched thin as economic growth in the United States and China continues to shrink once-plentiful reserves.
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