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NEWS
Jay Hancock | August 17, 2010
Rock 'n' roll won't save your soul, and it probably won't save the economy. But it offers a glimpse of the off-again, on-again recovery and at least one bright spot in Maryland manufacturing. Thanks to its own moxie, a rebound from last year's economic crash and what's maybe a glimmer of permanent economic recovery, Paul Reed Smith Guitars has seen recent sales volume get louder than a Carlos Santana solo. "It's a knock-on-wood experience for me," says Jack Higginbotham, PRS president.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
— Until recently, Paul Reed Smith Guitars sold only American-made instruments for more than $2,000 and Korean-made guitars retailing for about $700. To fill the gap — and with something U.S.-made, no less — the Eastern Shore company needed a design that could go from wood to instrument in dramatically less time. Guitars in its core, high-end line take about 20 hours to manufacture. Finding efficiencies is tricky enough when you mass-produce widgets. Imagine the challenge for a company whose niche is high-quality guitars — instruments that have to look and sound good enough to tempt buyers away from the better-known Fender and Gibson brands.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
— Until recently, Paul Reed Smith Guitars sold only American-made instruments for more than $2,000 and Korean-made guitars retailing for about $700. To fill the gap — and with something U.S.-made, no less — the Eastern Shore company needed a design that could go from wood to instrument in dramatically less time. Guitars in its core, high-end line take about 20 hours to manufacture. Finding efficiencies is tricky enough when you mass-produce widgets. Imagine the challenge for a company whose niche is high-quality guitars — instruments that have to look and sound good enough to tempt buyers away from the better-known Fender and Gibson brands.
NEWS
Jay Hancock | August 17, 2010
Rock 'n' roll won't save your soul, and it probably won't save the economy. But it offers a glimpse of the off-again, on-again recovery and at least one bright spot in Maryland manufacturing. Thanks to its own moxie, a rebound from last year's economic crash and what's maybe a glimmer of permanent economic recovery, Paul Reed Smith Guitars has seen recent sales volume get louder than a Carlos Santana solo. "It's a knock-on-wood experience for me," says Jack Higginbotham, PRS president.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Reinhold and Melanie Reinhold,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2004
The whole place is an acoustic phenomenon -- literally and figuratively. Besides being the birthplace of world-renowned instruments, the Paul Reed Smith Guitars factory in Stevensville is home to a variety of sounds during the guitar-making process. The shrieks of saws answer indefinable squeaks. A radio fights to be heard. To keep from injuring their ears, most workers wear earplugs or headphones. "It takes about 10 weeks for a guitar to be made," says Sam Barnes, the neck team manager.
FEATURES
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Paul Reed Smith Guitars, the Eastern Shore manufacturer that has made guitars for Carlos Santana and other high-profile musicians, will have two of its models featured in the newest version of the popular Guitar Hero video game. The models will be among several guitars that gamers can choose to "play." Guitar Hero Smash Hits, the latest version of the game, will be released Tuesday. The PRS guitars to be featured are the Custom 24, which is the company's top-selling guitar, and the SC 245, a vintage-style electric guitar.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2006
The guitars were earmarked for performers with Incubus, Train, Faith Hill's band and other groups. But the instruments crafted by renowned guitar maker Paul Reed Smith Guitars of Stevensville - a company best known as the builder of Carlos Santana's instruments - went missing. Now a former employee of PRS and his friend are facing trial in Annapolis, charged in a scheme to steal the custom guitars and sell them. Jeffrey Harry Lanahan, 44, who left his job in artist relations at PRS 8 1/2 months before his Annapolis home was searched last year, and his friend, Michael Jay Kelly, 42, of Arnold, are scheduled for trial in Anne Arundel Circuit Court starting tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun Reporter | August 21, 2008
Paul Reed Smith Guitars, the Eastern Shore company that makes guitars for Carlos Santana and other well-known musicians, has received a $10 million private equity bond from the state to help pay for a major expansion of its headquarters, company and economic development leaders said yesterday. The bond, which is tax-exempt and provides the company with a low interest rate for repaying the loan, will be used to help finance an 84,000-square-foot addition to the company's manufacturing facility at the Chesapeake Bay Business Park in Stevensville.
EXPLORE
May 24, 2011
Hamilton Arts Collective — 5502 Harford Road., presents Gimme Shelter Poetry Reading, May 28, 7:30 p.m. $5 donations accepted. Call 410-444-4272 or go to info@hamiltonarts.org . Baltimore Rock Opera Society — presents the BROS Double Feature, May 27-June 12, at Autograph Playhouse (the former Showtime Theatre) in Charles Village, featuring two original, live, rock operas, "Amphion" and "The Terrible Secret of Lunastus. " General admission is $15 general, $12 for artists, seniors and students.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Two Anne Arundel County men pleaded guilty yesterday to felony theft arising from a scheme to steal and sell high-end guitars made for musicians with the rock bands Third Eye Blind, The Dead and Incubus, among others. Jeffrey Harry Lanahan, 44, of Annapolis and Michael Jay Kelly, 42, of Arnold were accused of stealing about a dozen guitars manufactured by Paul Reed Smith Guitars in Stevensville, where Lanahan was an employee. The guitars were valued at about $57,900, according to court records.
FEATURES
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Paul Reed Smith Guitars, the Eastern Shore manufacturer that has made guitars for Carlos Santana and other high-profile musicians, will have two of its models featured in the newest version of the popular Guitar Hero video game. The models will be among several guitars that gamers can choose to "play." Guitar Hero Smash Hits, the latest version of the game, will be released Tuesday. The PRS guitars to be featured are the Custom 24, which is the company's top-selling guitar, and the SC 245, a vintage-style electric guitar.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun Reporter | August 21, 2008
Paul Reed Smith Guitars, the Eastern Shore company that makes guitars for Carlos Santana and other well-known musicians, has received a $10 million private equity bond from the state to help pay for a major expansion of its headquarters, company and economic development leaders said yesterday. The bond, which is tax-exempt and provides the company with a low interest rate for repaying the loan, will be used to help finance an 84,000-square-foot addition to the company's manufacturing facility at the Chesapeake Bay Business Park in Stevensville.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2006
The guitars were earmarked for performers with Incubus, Train, Faith Hill's band and other groups. But the instruments crafted by renowned guitar maker Paul Reed Smith Guitars of Stevensville - a company best known as the builder of Carlos Santana's instruments - went missing. Now a former employee of PRS and his friend are facing trial in Annapolis, charged in a scheme to steal the custom guitars and sell them. Jeffrey Harry Lanahan, 44, who left his job in artist relations at PRS 8 1/2 months before his Annapolis home was searched last year, and his friend, Michael Jay Kelly, 42, of Arnold, are scheduled for trial in Anne Arundel Circuit Court starting tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Reinhold and Melanie Reinhold,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2004
The whole place is an acoustic phenomenon -- literally and figuratively. Besides being the birthplace of world-renowned instruments, the Paul Reed Smith Guitars factory in Stevensville is home to a variety of sounds during the guitar-making process. The shrieks of saws answer indefinable squeaks. A radio fights to be heard. To keep from injuring their ears, most workers wear earplugs or headphones. "It takes about 10 weeks for a guitar to be made," says Sam Barnes, the neck team manager.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
Guitar maker Paul Reed Smith visited Long Reach High School last week to speak about dreams and aspirations, and to autograph a guitar. Smith's factory, PRS Guitars Ltd. of Stevensville has donated an electric guitar to every school in Maryland. In the audience were guitar and other music students, as well as students in the school's Career Research Development (CRD) courses, some of whom took time off from their jobs to attend the assembly. "It's pretty much a student-run assembly," said Foster Driver, who teaches CRD courses at the school.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
Perched on a hillside in Upperco and overlooking more than 9 acres of woods and rolling pastures, this quaint, custom-built Cape Cod emits the warmth of an old-world, early-American residence. Owners Michael Reid, a wood-procurement specialist for PRS Guitars, and wife Debbie, a former teacher at the Jemicy School, fell in love with the mostly untouched land and decided it would be the perfect place to build their home. "We really liked the lay of the land and the privacy it offered," says Michael Reid, who's moving with his wife, cat, dogs and three horses to a ranch in Montana that's a little more remote than his current property.
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