Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProvisional Government
IN THE NEWS

Provisional Government

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By RUSSELL WARREN HOWE | June 9, 1991
Washington. -- Pennsylvania-sized Eritrea, which calls itself Africa's last colony, is about to form a provisional government which will confirm its de facto independence from Ethiopia.Surprisingly little is known of the leadership of the victorious Eritrean People's Liberation Front. Its secretary general, Isaias Afwerki, who is expected to become either prime minister in a parliamentary system or executive president, is an elusive figure who has discouraged a personality cult.The front's literature mentions no other names and includes no pictures of any officials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By TIM KENNEDY | March 22, 2006
PRISTINA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO -- Kosovo's Serbs and Albanians finally are meeting to discuss the fate of what U.N. special representative Soren Jessen-Peterson describes as the "last piece of the puzzle in the Balkans." Although a final decision on whether Kosovo, a province of Serbia in the former Yugoslavia, should become an independent country lies with the U.N. Security Council, the duration of the process and its outcome will largely depend on the behavior of the two disputing parties, which are meeting in Vienna.
Advertisement
FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - As deadly new guerrilla attacks rocked the U.S.-led occupation, President Bush shifted policy on Iraq's political future yesterday, approving ideas for turning power over to a provisional government by the summer or fall of 2004. After two days of urgent meetings at the White House, Bush and his national security team approved an accelerated plan for elections intended to show Iraqis a "movement away from occupation" and to give them "a stake in running their own country," an administration official said.
NEWS
By TIM KENNEDY | March 22, 2006
PRISTINA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO -- Kosovo's Serbs and Albanians finally are meeting to discuss the fate of what U.N. special representative Soren Jessen-Peterson describes as the "last piece of the puzzle in the Balkans." Although a final decision on whether Kosovo, a province of Serbia in the former Yugoslavia, should become an independent country lies with the U.N. Security Council, the duration of the process and its outcome will largely depend on the behavior of the two disputing parties, which are meeting in Vienna.
NEWS
December 6, 2001
IT LOOKS too good to be true. Compromises among Afghans sometimes break down. There were five during the 1992-1996 anarchy that led to Taliban tyranny. The 28 delegates from four factions cooped up nine days in a hotel above the Rhine in Germany hammered out a 30-member provisional government to take power in Kabul for a few months. They agreed on United Nations peacekeepers to police the capital. Observers were stunned. Russia and Pakistan, powerful backers of rival factions, enthusiastically support the accord.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2003
TEHRAN, Iran - Ahmed Chalabi, the Iraqi opposition leader, announced yesterday that he intends to travel to Iraq shortly to meet with other opposition leaders and plan a provisional government that would replace the regime of Saddam Hussein. Chalabi, who heads the Iraqi National Congress, the main umbrella opposition group, told a news conference that he was going into Iraq despite objections from some members of the Bush administration but with the White House's blessing. The setting of Chalabi's message was almost as striking as the substance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The international peacekeeping force in Kosovo is clamping down hard on the Kosovo Liberation Army, seizing arms caches almost daily and confiscating documents and even cash in what some officials say is a determined effort to break the movement.NATO and United Nations officials maintain that the tougher action is routine, part of an agreement signed almost seven weeks ago that aimed to dismantle the rebel operation within three months.Until now, the NATO-led peacekeeping force has given the guerrillas a fairly wide berth.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - As deadly new guerrilla attacks rocked the U.S.-led occupation, President Bush shifted policy on Iraq's political future yesterday, approving ideas for turning power over to a provisional government by the summer or fall of 2004. After two days of urgent meetings at the White House, Bush and his national security team approved an accelerated plan for elections intended to show Iraqis a "movement away from occupation" and to give them "a stake in running their own country," an administration official said.
NEWS
December 21, 2001
THE TRIBAL leader Hamid Karzai starts as provisional prime minister of Afghanistan tomorrow with the good will of most Afghans and best wishes of most of the world. That may not be enough. Warlordism and insurgency, possibly combined with an attempt by the Taliban to re-emerge, imperil the provisional government. Mr. Karzai, though, brings to the post considerable personal skill. The Pashtun prime minister, known for his loyalty to the former king, also will have a multiethnic Cabinet with the major power portfolio in the hands of ethnic Tajiks from the Northern Alliance.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2003
Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein completed only seven films before dying at age 50 in 1948, but they were enough to make him one of the most revered and influential directors the world has ever seen. Evidence of his genius will be on display tonight at Shriver Hall on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University, with a 7:30 p.m. screening of October, his 1928 dramatization of the Bolshevik Revolution, loosely based on American journalist John Reed's book, Ten Days That Shook the World. The movie, being shown as part of Baltimore's Vivat!
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2003
TEHRAN, Iran - Ahmed Chalabi, the Iraqi opposition leader, announced yesterday that he intends to travel to Iraq shortly to meet with other opposition leaders and plan a provisional government that would replace the regime of Saddam Hussein. Chalabi, who heads the Iraqi National Congress, the main umbrella opposition group, told a news conference that he was going into Iraq despite objections from some members of the Bush administration but with the White House's blessing. The setting of Chalabi's message was almost as striking as the substance.
NEWS
December 21, 2001
THE TRIBAL leader Hamid Karzai starts as provisional prime minister of Afghanistan tomorrow with the good will of most Afghans and best wishes of most of the world. That may not be enough. Warlordism and insurgency, possibly combined with an attempt by the Taliban to re-emerge, imperil the provisional government. Mr. Karzai, though, brings to the post considerable personal skill. The Pashtun prime minister, known for his loyalty to the former king, also will have a multiethnic Cabinet with the major power portfolio in the hands of ethnic Tajiks from the Northern Alliance.
NEWS
December 6, 2001
IT LOOKS too good to be true. Compromises among Afghans sometimes break down. There were five during the 1992-1996 anarchy that led to Taliban tyranny. The 28 delegates from four factions cooped up nine days in a hotel above the Rhine in Germany hammered out a 30-member provisional government to take power in Kabul for a few months. They agreed on United Nations peacekeepers to police the capital. Observers were stunned. Russia and Pakistan, powerful backers of rival factions, enthusiastically support the accord.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The international peacekeeping force in Kosovo is clamping down hard on the Kosovo Liberation Army, seizing arms caches almost daily and confiscating documents and even cash in what some officials say is a determined effort to break the movement.NATO and United Nations officials maintain that the tougher action is routine, part of an agreement signed almost seven weeks ago that aimed to dismantle the rebel operation within three months.Until now, the NATO-led peacekeeping force has given the guerrillas a fairly wide berth.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 25, 1998
PARIS -- It is a useful coincidence that while Kofi Annan was negotiating the agreement ending, or suspending, the Iraq crisis, the CIA's internal inquiry on the Bay of Pigs fiasco appeared in the press.Both were consequences of the reality that overturning a government is not as simple as many in Washington think -- or thought in 1961, and thought again during the weeks that led up to the United Nations secretary-general's trip to Baghdad.A Wall Street Journal editorial on the agreement negotiated by Mr. Annan, representative of much Washington opinion, deplores the fact that the secretary-general has provided a new obstacle to the United States in taking "decisive action against Iraq," so that Saddam Hussein can no longer defy "the civilized world."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | May 28, 1991
LONDON -- Ethiopia's rebel factions agreed to a cease-fire yesterday at U.S.-sponsored peace talks, possibly clearing the way for formation of a provisional government and long-term moves toward democracy after decades of civil war.Immediately after the breakthrough, the chief U.S. negotiator, Herman Cohen, urged the largest rebel group surrounding Addis Ababa to take control of the Ethiopian capital "as soon as possible to help stabilize the situation."Shortly...
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 11, 1997
PARIS -- This past weekend brought the 80th anniversary of the October Revolution in Russia, which did not happen.It did not happen because it was not a revolution. A coup d'etat took place in Petrograd -- now Saint Petersburg, ephemerally Leningrad -- at the end of October 1917. Russia still followed the Julian calendar; by our calendar the decisive events took place Nov. 6-9.Fateful dayThe leaders of the small Bolshevik party broke with the provisional government on Nov. 6. The next day their Red Guards and some soldiers and sailors took control of the city.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 11, 1997
PARIS -- This past weekend brought the 80th anniversary of the October Revolution in Russia, which did not happen.It did not happen because it was not a revolution. A coup d'etat took place in Petrograd -- now Saint Petersburg, ephemerally Leningrad -- at the end of October 1917. Russia still followed the Julian calendar; by our calendar the decisive events took place Nov. 6-9.Fateful dayThe leaders of the small Bolshevik party broke with the provisional government on Nov. 6. The next day their Red Guards and some soldiers and sailors took control of the city.
FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.