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By Marie Gullard | Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
Two iron lamps on chunky fieldstone posts straddle the entrance to a driveway that ambles past a sprawling front lawn and ends at the side garages attached to the equally sprawling, two-story Provencal-style home of the Twigg family. The gray stucco of the exterior, with gables, second-floor dormers and four white columns supporting a large roof over the front porch, would suggest an established estate were it not for new saplings planted along the ends of the property and the construction of houses rising nearby.
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BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard | Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
Two iron lamps on chunky fieldstone posts straddle the entrance to a driveway that ambles past a sprawling front lawn and ends at the side garages attached to the equally sprawling, two-story Provencal-style home of the Twigg family. The gray stucco of the exterior, with gables, second-floor dormers and four white columns supporting a large roof over the front porch, would suggest an established estate were it not for new saplings planted along the ends of the property and the construction of houses rising nearby.
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TRAVEL
February 24, 2002
Ever wanted to gaze at the same light that illuminated Van Gogh's world, walk the village streets Renoir once walked, or take a brush in hand and try to capture the same settings Cezanne painted? Picture Provence Tours, a 3-year-old Baltimore-based company, offers just that, and you don't have to be a Van Gogh to participate. The company offers five weeklong tours called "learning vacations" for artists of all abilities. Guests travel through the Provence area of France indulging in great food, wine, beautiful sights and various art classes taught by experts.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
In contrast to the American rural character of the area, the garden at the Eastern Shore home of Michael and Mary Ann Bowers looks like something out of Provence. An arbor-sheltered porch, big terra cotta pots frothing with annuals, and a lattice thick with autumn clematis all whisper rustic Gallic charm. But it's the Marydel garden itself -- comprising four raised square beds -- that really sets the mood. Salvaged garden decorations -- a nubbly concrete birdbath, a verdigris sundial -- punctuate three squares, and designer Mary Ann Bowers has filled the fourth with fragrant lavender, perennials and culinary herbs.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2005
Again and again - beginning in 1882, when he returned from Paris to his native Provence, until his death there in 1906 - Paul Cezanne painted the brooding form of Mont Sainte Victoire in rhythmic brushstrokes of shimmering intensity. As a young man, his great ambition had been "to make of Impressionism something solid and durable, like the art of the museums." In Provence, he accomplished that goal and, in the process, changed the course of European art. This is the achievement celebrated in Cezanne in Provence, the major retrospective marking the 100th anniversary of the artist's death that opens next year at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Bryant and Elizabeth Bryant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
SIMIANE-LA-ROTONDE, France - Here and there in the highest plateaus of Haute Provence, the scent of heady lavender still mixes with sun-baked pine as tractors slice through the last of the season's purple flowers. At the sprawling farm of Alain Cassan, in the rolling hills of southeastern France, the harvest has ended. Trailers are stacked high with neatly tied bunches of lavender. In the coming weeks, they will be dried, packed in 45-pound burlap bags and shipped to dealers. The journey ends at trendy boutiques in New York or Paris, where the flowers are sold as dried bouquets or in perfumed sachets.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 1997
AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France -- Painters know the region well because it has served so beautifully as subject matter: the French-blue Mediterranean, gnarled black-and-silver olive trees, chalky mountains, flirtatious villages, timeless brasseries and, of course, the ruins of an ancient Roman domain.Last fall, that fabulous setting attracted a swarm of amateur artists from Santa Barbara, Calif., who gathered noisily one rainy October morning in the medieval darkness of the breakfast room at Hotel Les Augustins.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
With war in the Gulf, international travel is down. But thos hungry for some foreign sunshine might consider opening an international cookbook. The best have history, illustrations, and much of the charm of a real trip overseas.Sunny Provence, in the south of France, is the star of "Bouquet de Provence,"(Clarkson N. Potter 1990, $16.95 hardback, 113 pages). The miniature cookbook by restaurateur Jean-Andre Charial-Thuilier is a gustatory nosegay to the region; the book contains only 40 recipes, but is filled with exquisite color paintings of Provencal landscapes and fabric patterns on every page.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2000
LES PETITS Chanteurs d'Aix-en-Provence (The Little Singers from Aix-en-Provence) delivered a spellbinding performance Sunday at St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Mount Airy. Nearly 300 people were treated to an evening of powerful voices and melodic harmonies of these very talented French boys and young men. The choir is made up of about 40 French boys and young men ages 7 to 20 from the city of Aix-en-Provence, a vacation paradise in southeastern France and the birthplace of painter Paul Cezanne in 1839.
NEWS
By ANNE BURLEY | November 11, 1993
Pasadena.--The words are not easy to read, because the letters have become worn in the almost 50 years since they were inscribed, but with care they can still be made out: ''27 Aout 1944. Entree du 'First Special.' Liberation de Saint Paul.'' Saint Paul is St. Paul-de-Vence in Provence, France, and the words are inscribed on the ancient stones of one of its gateways.Around me the tourists are flocking up the narrow street to shop at the boutiques and ateliers of this charming village. After lunch they may drop by the cemetery so that they can tell their friends back in Ohio or Burton-on-Trent that they have seen the grave of Marc Chagall.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2005
Again and again - beginning in 1882, when he returned from Paris to his native Provence, until his death there in 1906 - Paul Cezanne painted the brooding form of Mont Sainte Victoire in rhythmic brushstrokes of shimmering intensity. As a young man, his great ambition had been "to make of Impressionism something solid and durable, like the art of the museums." In Provence, he accomplished that goal and, in the process, changed the course of European art. This is the achievement celebrated in Cezanne in Provence, the major retrospective marking the 100th anniversary of the artist's death that opens next year at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Bryant and Elizabeth Bryant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
SIMIANE-LA-ROTONDE, France - Here and there in the highest plateaus of Haute Provence, the scent of heady lavender still mixes with sun-baked pine as tractors slice through the last of the season's purple flowers. At the sprawling farm of Alain Cassan, in the rolling hills of southeastern France, the harvest has ended. Trailers are stacked high with neatly tied bunches of lavender. In the coming weeks, they will be dried, packed in 45-pound burlap bags and shipped to dealers. The journey ends at trendy boutiques in New York or Paris, where the flowers are sold as dried bouquets or in perfumed sachets.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2002
Ever wanted to gaze at the same light that illuminated Van Gogh's world, walk the village streets Renoir once walked, or take a brush in hand and try to capture the same settings Cezanne painted? Picture Provence Tours, a 3-year-old Baltimore-based company, offers just that, and you don't have to be a Van Gogh to participate. The company offers five weeklong tours called "learning vacations" for artists of all abilities. Guests travel through the Provence area of France indulging in great food, wine, beautiful sights and various art classes taught by experts.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2000
LES PETITS Chanteurs d'Aix-en-Provence (The Little Singers from Aix-en-Provence) delivered a spellbinding performance Sunday at St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Mount Airy. Nearly 300 people were treated to an evening of powerful voices and melodic harmonies of these very talented French boys and young men. The choir is made up of about 40 French boys and young men ages 7 to 20 from the city of Aix-en-Provence, a vacation paradise in southeastern France and the birthplace of painter Paul Cezanne in 1839.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 28, 2000
My husband, a college professor, is on sabbatical this semester working on a project that required that he do research in Paris. It didn't take me long to decide that I'd like to accompany him to one of the world's most celebrated culinary meccas, so for several weeks this spring we are living in a Left Bank apartment in France's capital. While my spouse departs for the libraries to pore over musty tomes each day, I pack my shopping bags and head for the nearby food markets. A few blocks away there's an outdoor marche that is crowded with merchants selling fresh seasonal fare.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie D. Fletcher and Stephanie D. Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2000
The South of France? No, South Carolina. During a weekend retreat to La Bastide, my husband and I linger over a sumptuous Provencal breakfast of crab omelets, savory rabbit and veal sausage, croissants and strong hot coffee replenished from a steaming silver pot. Occasionally we gaze out the dining room's French doors to admire the cloudless turquoise sky and the irregular profile of purple mountains. Outside, a walled courtyard features a dormant perennial garden, stone-paved patio, croquette lawn and gravel court for the French game petanque.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
In a minute, we'll get to the new book and the new movie deal but first, let's clear up the matter of where exactly Peter Mayle, the best-selling author of "A Year in Provence" and "Toujours Provence," currently resides.Is it true that the Pied Piper of Provence, the British expatriate whose last five blockbuster books have celebrated the glories of living in the south of France, is now residing in the east of Long Island? That he has abandoned -- after stirring up the desire in millions of us to pick up and move to Provence -- the charming, remote village of Menerbes for the ever-so-chic village of Amagansett in the Hamptons?
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 24, 1999
Ratatouille, that classic Provencal combination of eggplant, tomatoes, onions and zucchini, is one of my favorite dishes to use when entertaining. This dish actually improves in flavor when made one to two days ahead. The entire preparation can be cooked in advance and simply needs to be heated at serving time. Or, if you prefer, it's delicious served at room temperature. Another benefit of using ratatouille when cooking for company is that the recipe can be doubled or tripled easily when you want to invite a large crowd.
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