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October 6, 2000
`The Tic Code' Rated R (Adult language) Sun score ** 1/2 Heartfelt, if a little melodramatic (especially in its labored final act), "The Tic Code" is the story of a young boy with Tourette's syndrome who finds not only escape in the similarly syncopated world of jazz, but a desperately needed father figure. Actress Polly Draper (TV's "thirtysomething") wrote the screenplay based on the experiences of her husband, jazz musician Michael Wolff, who is afflicted with Tourette's, a condition that causes tics, twitches, compulsive behavior and, occasionally, an uncontrollable tendency to swear.
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NEWS
By Jesse Cohen and Jesse Cohen,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Proust Was a Neuroscientist By Jonah Lehrer Houghton Mifflin / 242 pages / $24 Thanks to advances in neuroscience, a new model of the brain has emerged: dynamic, plastic, constantly regenerating and reorganizing itself, processing stimuli with such creative virtuosity that it's hard to tell where reality ends and our mental translation of it begins. Optical illusions, in which the brain creates shapes, colors and movement absent in the images, are but one example. Jonah Lehrer, a science journalist with a neuroscience background, argues in Proust Was a Neuroscientist that this model is not as new as it seems.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | July 28, 1992
IN HIS 1,047-pager, "What It Takes," Richard Ben Cramer does for American politics what Marcel Proust did for the cookie. After dipping his madeleine in tea, you remember, Proust experienced total recall of French social and cultural history from Charlemagne to Maurice Chevalier. It took him 1.5 million words to get it on paper. Some say more like 2 million.Mr. Cramer has ambitions to play in Proust's league, but he has handicapped himself by choosing politics for his explorations. Thus, as of this morning, after just five weeks of reading, I was up to Page 635, Chapter 63.Reaching Page 635 of Proust's masterpiece, "Remembrance of Things Past," took me seven years.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
The narrator of Marcel Proust's epic work may have found his muse in literature's most famous tea cake, but it was his mother who supplied it. She's the one who quietly serves him that madeleine on a rainy night when he comes home depressed and convinced he has failed in life. From the baptism in tea of that buttery, shell-shaped sweet spring memories of a small French town that fill seven volumes of the epic Remembrance of Things Past (also known as In Search of Lost Time). "His mother is really the one who makes him give birth to his creation, and she has done it in the most typically motherly way," said Armine Kotin Mortimer, a professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who co-edited a collection of essays on Proust.
NEWS
December 12, 2005
Robert Sheckley, 77, a writer of science fiction whose disarmingly playful stories pack a nihilistic subtext, died Friday from complications of a brain aneurysm in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He wrote more than 15 novels and about 400 short stories; the actual total is uncertain since he was so prolific in his heyday, the 1950s and '60s, that magazine editors insisted he publish some stories under pseudonyms to avoid having his byline appear more than once in...
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
The narrator of Marcel Proust's epic work may have found his muse in literature's most famous tea cake, but it was his mother who supplied it. She's the one who quietly serves him that madeleine on a rainy night when he comes home depressed and convinced he has failed in life. From the baptism in tea of that buttery, shell-shaped sweet spring memories of a small French town that fill seven volumes of the epic Remembrance of Things Past (also known as In Search of Lost Time). "His mother is really the one who makes him give birth to his creation, and she has done it in the most typically motherly way," said Armine Kotin Mortimer, a professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who co-edited a collection of essays on Proust.
NEWS
By Jesse Cohen and Jesse Cohen,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Proust Was a Neuroscientist By Jonah Lehrer Houghton Mifflin / 242 pages / $24 Thanks to advances in neuroscience, a new model of the brain has emerged: dynamic, plastic, constantly regenerating and reorganizing itself, processing stimuli with such creative virtuosity that it's hard to tell where reality ends and our mental translation of it begins. Optical illusions, in which the brain creates shapes, colors and movement absent in the images, are but one example. Jonah Lehrer, a science journalist with a neuroscience background, argues in Proust Was a Neuroscientist that this model is not as new as it seems.
NEWS
By Ellen Kirvin Dudis | April 6, 1994
AN 83-year-old woman I know is losing her memory.After a brain scan, after blood tests for vitamin deficiencies and metabolic abnormalities, the doctor offers his best guess for her dementia: Alzheimer's disease.Everyone who knows this woman reacts with the same disbelief and dismay -- "but she was always so sharp, so assured, so independent!" Now, repeating the same questions over and over, she no longer is certain where she is or the events of her life for the last 25 years. And it is very hard for us to accept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | March 26, 2000
"Marcel Proust: A Life," by William C. Carter. Yale University Press. 1,024 pages. $35. When considering a book like this, which is more than 1,000 pages, one is forced to confront the sheer size of the thing, and when you consider this heft, if not bulk, it seems that large scale in books is a lot like large scale in other pursuits, such as the accumulation of money. Size is intimidating. In fact, it is difficult to conceive of the devotion that has gone into William C. Carter's "Marcel Proust: A Life," although, to be perfectly honest, there are times when one's eyes glaze over, as though contemplating some other exceedingly difficult and detailed operation, the building of a sailing ship out of kitchen matches, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 10, 1999
Let's begin with a question about biography: Is it obligatory that the life stories of the great be either interminably long or indigestibly complex? I pray not. Inspired by that hope, Penguin Putnam Inc. has launched a commitment to publish two significant biographies a year, very short by traditional standards, written by demonstratedly engaging writers who are fascinated by their subjects.The full results -- "Penguin Lives" -- will have to be spoken for book by book. But the first is out: "Marcel Proust: A Penguin Life," by Edmund White (Penguin, 165 pages, $19.95)
NEWS
December 12, 2005
Robert Sheckley, 77, a writer of science fiction whose disarmingly playful stories pack a nihilistic subtext, died Friday from complications of a brain aneurysm in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He wrote more than 15 novels and about 400 short stories; the actual total is uncertain since he was so prolific in his heyday, the 1950s and '60s, that magazine editors insisted he publish some stories under pseudonyms to avoid having his byline appear more than once in...
FEATURES
October 6, 2000
`The Tic Code' Rated R (Adult language) Sun score ** 1/2 Heartfelt, if a little melodramatic (especially in its labored final act), "The Tic Code" is the story of a young boy with Tourette's syndrome who finds not only escape in the similarly syncopated world of jazz, but a desperately needed father figure. Actress Polly Draper (TV's "thirtysomething") wrote the screenplay based on the experiences of her husband, jazz musician Michael Wolff, who is afflicted with Tourette's, a condition that causes tics, twitches, compulsive behavior and, occasionally, an uncontrollable tendency to swear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | March 26, 2000
"Marcel Proust: A Life," by William C. Carter. Yale University Press. 1,024 pages. $35. When considering a book like this, which is more than 1,000 pages, one is forced to confront the sheer size of the thing, and when you consider this heft, if not bulk, it seems that large scale in books is a lot like large scale in other pursuits, such as the accumulation of money. Size is intimidating. In fact, it is difficult to conceive of the devotion that has gone into William C. Carter's "Marcel Proust: A Life," although, to be perfectly honest, there are times when one's eyes glaze over, as though contemplating some other exceedingly difficult and detailed operation, the building of a sailing ship out of kitchen matches, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 10, 1999
Let's begin with a question about biography: Is it obligatory that the life stories of the great be either interminably long or indigestibly complex? I pray not. Inspired by that hope, Penguin Putnam Inc. has launched a commitment to publish two significant biographies a year, very short by traditional standards, written by demonstratedly engaging writers who are fascinated by their subjects.The full results -- "Penguin Lives" -- will have to be spoken for book by book. But the first is out: "Marcel Proust: A Penguin Life," by Edmund White (Penguin, 165 pages, $19.95)
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | July 30, 1997
Paris -- Traveling to Pere-Lachaise Cemetery on the Metro, it is not unusual to see dozens of passengers carrying huge sprays of flowers: pink roses, baby's breath, yellow lilies, gardenias, all wrapped in a clear plastic that crackles each time the train leans into a turn.When the Metro car arrives at its destination and the doors open, the smell of roses and gardenias spills out, drifting above the departing passengers like a fragrant cloud.One such passenger -- an American we shall call Madame S. -- makes a point of never visiting Paris without a trip to this lush 108-acre sanctuary in the eastern part of the city.
NEWS
By Ellen Kirvin Dudis | April 6, 1994
AN 83-year-old woman I know is losing her memory.After a brain scan, after blood tests for vitamin deficiencies and metabolic abnormalities, the doctor offers his best guess for her dementia: Alzheimer's disease.Everyone who knows this woman reacts with the same disbelief and dismay -- "but she was always so sharp, so assured, so independent!" Now, repeating the same questions over and over, she no longer is certain where she is or the events of her life for the last 25 years. And it is very hard for us to accept.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | July 30, 1997
Paris -- Traveling to Pere-Lachaise Cemetery on the Metro, it is not unusual to see dozens of passengers carrying huge sprays of flowers: pink roses, baby's breath, yellow lilies, gardenias, all wrapped in a clear plastic that crackles each time the train leans into a turn.When the Metro car arrives at its destination and the doors open, the smell of roses and gardenias spills out, drifting above the departing passengers like a fragrant cloud.One such passenger -- an American we shall call Madame S. -- makes a point of never visiting Paris without a trip to this lush 108-acre sanctuary in the eastern part of the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | March 23, 2003
It doesn't feel like a terrorist's lair. Harold Bloom greets me jovially. Just inside the front door of his house in New Haven, Conn., is a homey, 30-foot living room, where books cover almost every surface and a bit of the floor. Within minutes, eyes bright, he instructs me that he is a guerrilla. At 72, undaunted by severe illness, he is fighting on in the aftermath of -- in his view -- a lost war between classic academic principles and what he takes to be an anti-intellectual, anti-cultural, self-servingly political conquest of higher education.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | July 28, 1992
IN HIS 1,047-pager, "What It Takes," Richard Ben Cramer does for American politics what Marcel Proust did for the cookie. After dipping his madeleine in tea, you remember, Proust experienced total recall of French social and cultural history from Charlemagne to Maurice Chevalier. It took him 1.5 million words to get it on paper. Some say more like 2 million.Mr. Cramer has ambitions to play in Proust's league, but he has handicapped himself by choosing politics for his explorations. Thus, as of this morning, after just five weeks of reading, I was up to Page 635, Chapter 63.Reaching Page 635 of Proust's masterpiece, "Remembrance of Things Past," took me seven years.
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