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NEWS
July 16, 2009
On Sunday, July 12, 2009, Mrs. Velma A. Proulx Visitation for family and friends will be held on Friday, July 17th, 2009 from 11:00 - 1:00 P.M. in HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland with Funeral Service at 1:00 P.M. in the Funeral Home. Interment will follow in Loudon Park Cemetery. In Lieu of flowers, donations may be made in remembrance to the Alzheimer's Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, MD 21093 or to Halethorpe Community Church, 1312 Francis Avenue, Halethorpe, MD 21227.
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NEWS
July 16, 2009
On Sunday, July 12, 2009, Mrs. Velma A. Proulx Visitation for family and friends will be held on Friday, July 17th, 2009 from 11:00 - 1:00 P.M. in HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland with Funeral Service at 1:00 P.M. in the Funeral Home. Interment will follow in Loudon Park Cemetery. In Lieu of flowers, donations may be made in remembrance to the Alzheimer's Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, MD 21093 or to Halethorpe Community Church, 1312 Francis Avenue, Halethorpe, MD 21227.
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NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | July 1, 2005
Baltimore attorney Thomas M. Lingan has been elected chairman of the board of trustees at the Community College of Baltimore County. Lingan, of Catonsville, was appointed to the board in 1997 and has served as vice chairman for five years. He is a partner in Venable LLP. He replaces Francis X. Kelly Jr.,who held the leadership post for nine years. The college also named Eugenia Proulx, president of the school's Dundalk and Essex campuses, as interim chancellor. Proulx will replace Irving Pressley McPhail, who is leaving the post today to pursue other opportunities.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
No one likes getting pulled over for speeding. But Howard County police promise that a new technology deployed recently at least makes such stops more convenient for highway scofflaws. More than 50 county cruisers have been equipped with a system developed by the Maryland State Police that allows officers to issue electronic traffic citations more quickly and in a less-messy form. With the new system, called E-TIX, officers scan the driver's license, select the violation and print a copy of the citation on waterproof, hard-to-rip thermal paper.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
While Eugenia Proulx was preparing in August to take over as president of Dundalk's community college, her mother came to visit and asked a favor: Could they visit Martell Avenue? Proulx believed it to be a curious request, but the two drove to the street. Suddenly, she noticed tears in her 74-year-old mother's eyes. Only then did Proulx discover that her parents had begun their married life more than 50 years ago in a modest home a few blocks from the Dundalk campus. Proulx tells the story often to illustrate her connection to the gritty blue-collar community that is home to the smallest campus of the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC)
FEATURES
By Susan M. Barbieri and Susan M. Barbieri,Orlando Sentinel | April 27, 1993
There are some heroes in literature who fall under the heading of loser-heroes -- those slightly pathetic, questing characters in the tradition of Saul Bellow's Tommy Wilhelm or Arthur Miller's Willy Loman. We accompany them on their valiant search for happiness, and we desperately want them to prevail.That's because there is a little Tommy and Willy in each of us. There's a little bit of Quoyle, too.Quoyle is the main character in E. Annie Proulx's outstanding new novel, "The Shipping News."
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
Hammond senior John Motley says he has learned at least one important lesson as a result of his wrestling involvement."Things don't always go your way, but that's no reason to quit or let down," said the defending county champion, who hopes to become a state champion this season.Starting as a 5-year-old, Motley dreamed of being a high school basketball star."I went to summer camps and played it all the time," he said.But by his freshman year he was only 5 feet 5 and was released from Hammond's team on the first cut.Encouraged by wrestling coach Bill Smith, who saw in Motley the kind of aggressive attitude he wanted, Motley joined the wrestling team and it proved to be a perfect match.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
No one likes getting pulled over for speeding. But Howard County police promise that a new technology deployed recently at least makes such stops more convenient for highway scofflaws. More than 50 county cruisers have been equipped with a system developed by the Maryland State Police that allows officers to issue electronic traffic citations more quickly and in a less-messy form. With the new system, called E-TIX, officers scan the driver's license, select the violation and print a copy of the citation on waterproof, hard-to-rip thermal paper.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Michael Richman | December 10, 1993
Mike Chang, Hammond, 112, Jr. -- He finished third in the county and his skill at Gramby rolls makes it hard to keep him down.* Seth Eldridge, Howard, 171, Sr. -- A four-year wrestler, Eldridge is coming off a 23-6 season in which he placed fourth in the county and third in the region at 152.* Jeff Feaga, Glenelg, 112, Jr. -- He finished second in the county with a 20-12 record and was one match away from going to the states.* Yuri Freeman, Oakland Mills, 112, Sr. -- The four-year veteran was 23-9 and county champ last season.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1993
Coach Bill Smith knows it. His wrestlers know it. Hammond's wrestling program is entering arguably the most critical period in its history.This is the year the Golden Bears must finally put up. This is the year they must win the big one. Starting with this weekend's county tournament and continuing into the 2A-1A regionals the following week, this is the time for the Bears to shine like they never have.Too much pressure? The Bears have been putting pressure on themselves since the first day of practice.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | July 1, 2005
Baltimore attorney Thomas M. Lingan has been elected chairman of the board of trustees at the Community College of Baltimore County. Lingan, of Catonsville, was appointed to the board in 1997 and has served as vice chairman for five years. He is a partner in Venable LLP. He replaces Francis X. Kelly Jr.,who held the leadership post for nine years. The college also named Eugenia Proulx, president of the school's Dundalk and Essex campuses, as interim chancellor. Proulx will replace Irving Pressley McPhail, who is leaving the post today to pursue other opportunities.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2003
Before she became a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Annie Proulx co-authored a book that's especially useful this time of year. Cider: Making, Using and Enjoying Sweet and Hard Cider by Proulx and professional cider-maker Lew Nichols first appeared in 1980 and sold more than 57,000 copies in its first two editions. The book's success reflected a renewed interest in making wine, beer and cider at home. It probably has also helped spur more interest by providing a handbook thorough enough to guide even a novice through the process of cider-making.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | December 15, 2002
That Old Ace in the Hole, by Annie Proulx. Scribner. 384 pages. $26. Annie Proulx is our literary explorer, venturing forth into mostly unchartered terrain (Newfoundland in The Shipping News, Wyoming in Close Range), then emerging with her notebook and imagination re-stocked with quirky facts, eccentric characters and memorable tales. This time, Proulx has set her creative sights on the arid and forlorn landscape of the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, the states "stacked like dirty pots in the sink, their handles touching."
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Pulitzer Prize-winning author E. Annie Proulx casually dropped a bomb: "I hope never to write another novel," said Proulx, whose second novel, The Shipping News, won the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award and has been made into a major-release film starring Kevin Spacey. "I prefer writing short stories. They're difficult and demanding, but they don't eat you alive the way a novel does." At that particular moment, Proulx might have been feeling especially consumed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Pundits often put down audiobooks as Classic Comics for commuters. But I can't wait to find a copy of Robert Joy reading Annie Proulx's novel The Shipping News. To my eye and ear, Proulx's mannered, deadly patches revive when read out loud - and Joy, who has a small part in the movie, is just the kind of idiosyncratic actor who can pull off her prose. The syntax that unwinds and contracts, often in staccato fashion, and the lilting lists and descriptions come together in an invented brogue that has as much to do with Proulx's own rhythmic sense as it does with the accents of her upstate New York and Newfoundland settings.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
While Eugenia Proulx was preparing in August to take over as president of Dundalk's community college, her mother came to visit and asked a favor: Could they visit Martell Avenue? Proulx believed it to be a curious request, but the two drove to the street. Suddenly, she noticed tears in her 74-year-old mother's eyes. Only then did Proulx discover that her parents had begun their married life more than 50 years ago in a modest home a few blocks from the Dundalk campus. Proulx tells the story often to illustrate her connection to the gritty blue-collar community that is home to the smallest campus of the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC)
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2003
Before she became a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Annie Proulx co-authored a book that's especially useful this time of year. Cider: Making, Using and Enjoying Sweet and Hard Cider by Proulx and professional cider-maker Lew Nichols first appeared in 1980 and sold more than 57,000 copies in its first two editions. The book's success reflected a renewed interest in making wine, beer and cider at home. It probably has also helped spur more interest by providing a handbook thorough enough to guide even a novice through the process of cider-making.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | February 9, 1994
Chris Williams looks to put a year of agony behind him this weekend.A 152-pound Hammond senior, Williams is the favorite to win his weight class at the Howard County wrestling tournament, which would conclude a yearlong mission to regain the title that he won as a sophomore.Williams sat out last year because of academic reasons and was unable to defend his 152-pound county crown."It really hurt a lot," Williams said about watching the county tournament last year. "But especially because I felt I hurt the team."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | April 25, 1999
"Close Range: Wyoming Stories," by Annie Proulx with illustrations by William Matthews. Scribner. 285 pages. $25.Local color, rough weather and even tougher circumstances have always dominated Annie Proulx's fiction. "Shipping News," her portrayal of a widowed, third-rate newspaperman's struggle not just to survive but to prevail in a harsh Newfoundland climate, won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Proulx's novel "Postcards" and her collection "Heart Songs and Other Stories" chronicled the despair of New England farmers hovering on the brink of failure.
FEATURES
By Karol Menzie and Karol Menzie,Sun Staff | April 19, 1998
What to do about mud seasonIt's true that April showers bring May flowers, but in the meantime, they bring plenty of mud. If you're tired of having glop tracked across your floors, here are some hints from "Yankee Magazine's Practical Problem Solver," by Earl Proulx (Yankee Books, 1998, $27.95).* Use doormats, and plenty of them. Put one inside, one outside. Outside, use a mat with a grate or grill design, so scraped-off mud can fall through the spaces, rather than caking, as it might do on a solid bristle-type mat.* Look for an antique or reproduction iron boot scraper or boot brush, and install it outside the door.
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