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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | May 19, 1998
REP. DAN Burton of Indiana is being criticized even by some of his fellow Republicans for releasing doctored transcripts of taped conversations between Webster L. Hubbell and his wife, made while Hubbell was in prison.The way the tapes were edited makes even protestations of innocence sound like confessions to crimes.Some Democrats in Congress and some journalists are comparing this to the heyday of Sen. Joe McCarthy's demagogic reign of terror back in the 1950s. For example, New York Times columnist Frank Rich said it reminded him of "the prototype of 1954" when during Senate hearings on alleged Communists in the Army McCarthy tried to make points with a doctored photograph.
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HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
For those waiting on surgery to place a defibrillator inside their chest, special vests can deliver lifesaving shocks in the event of a heart arrhythmia. But the downside, some say, is that the vests are so uncomfortable some patients don't wear them all the time. A team of undergraduate Johns Hopkins University students, led by an alumnus inventor, set out to build a new prototype defibrillator vest that is more comfortable and works more effectively. The result — a vest that has won competitions and might be headed for approved medical use. "Each aspect of this had to not only function correctly but we had to think of it separately, like, how do we make it convenient and comfortable for the patient?"
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FEATURES
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
He's a real American hero and that doesn't come cheap. The 1963 G.I. Joe action figure prototype sold for $200,000 to a private buyer last June after failing to fetch the $250,000 minimum bid at a San Diego comic book auction. "When I saw there was an opportunity to buy it post-sale, I jumped all over it," said the buyer, Steve Geppi, publisher of Baltimore magazine and owner of Diamond Comic Distributors in Timonium. "When you consider it's not just only the first G.I. Joe, but it's the first action figure prototype - this is kind of the Mona Lisa of toys."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Giant Food's newest Baltimore-area store offers a glimpse of the future for the region's dominant grocer, when shoppers increasingly rely on technology, demand more organic foods and expect a wide selection of prepared meals. Giant, which has been steadily launching new locations, remodeling older supermarkets and acquiring competitors' closed outlets, is set to open its newest store Friday in Perry Hall. Not just another supermarket, the store is expected to serve as a prototype for future Giants, including several that will be part of mixed-use developments in Washington, said Jamie Miller, a Giant spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 20, 1993
Sears, Roebuck & Co. has hired the Baltimore architecture firm RTKL Associates Inc. to design a prototype for its "store of the future" as part of the retailer's $4 billion effort to overhaul 500 stores.The contract for a joint venture between RTKL and a New York interior design firm was signed in August, but Kurt Haglund, assistant to RTKL chairman Harold L. Adams, said yesterday that Sears initially asked that RTKL not announce the transaction."We're trying to respond to what Sears wants to be. . . . They're a full-line department store," said Joseph Scalabrin, vice chairman of RTKL and head of the firm's Dallas office, which is directing RTKL's role in the project.
BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1997
FREDERICK -- Enter this townhouse and you'll find a refrigerator that uses the same amount of energy as a 60-watt bulb.You'll discover that the windows are placed to take maximum advantage of the orientation of the house.You'll see finishes and sheathing whose primary purpose is to save energy.This is not your ordinary townhouse.It's a glimpse into the future -- an experiment prepared and designed by a group of manufacturers who are seeking the most energy-efficient ways to build.Last Monday, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB)
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 14, 2003
CHANGSHA, China - The way Fang Yaolun sees it, his problems began when the workers at the factory realized what they were building for him. Fang, a self-taught engineer and inventor with 15 patents, came up with an innovative idea for a product not long after his divorce in 1995: an adjustable bed whose design, he believed, would aid sex and exercise. The bed would be a high-tech Craftmatic for the Kama Sutra set. With an expected price tag of more than $5,000, it is targeted at a fast-growing sector, the millions of urban Chinese with money to burn.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 29, 1993
Washington. -- Could the best model to help bleeding urban neighborhoods be a 107-year-old prototype?Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
June 10, 1994
An incomplete map accompanied an article Tuesday in the Maryland section on a feasibility study of a prototype 300-mph magnetic levitation train. These are the four alternative routes for a regional maglev system, a project that currently lacks federal support.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
Efforts to bring a high-speed magnetic levitation train to the Baltimore-Washington corridor have been derailed.The proposed budget presented by President Clinton Monday includes no money to develop maglev technology in the United States or to develop a prototype.The 300-mph train service has long faced funding battles in Congress, but the administration's decision could kill it altogether."If the program isn't dead, it's barely breathing. We'll have to wait for another time," said E. Wayne Thevenot, a maglev lobbyist in Washington.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Dallas Griffiths was immediately intrigued by a scholarship offer from Maryland last spring, and his affinity for the Terps grew stronger after an official visit to College Park in September. But when it came to making a decision about his college future, the 6-foot-2, 225-pound middle linebacker abided by a strict timeline.  “He knew he didn't want to drag it out too long, but at the same time, he wanted to take some visits and have an opportunity to discuss things with his family,” said Robert Craft , Griffiths' coach at North Florida Christian School in Tallahassee.
SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
— As he was trying to get on Navy's recruiting radar five years ago, Kriss Proctor failed to convince a major skeptic that going to the academy was the right move. When Sandie Proctor refused to send her younger son's highlight tape out to the coaches in Annapolis, Kriss Proctor snuck one in the mail to Navy defensive end Matt Nechak, a family friend and fellow Southern Californian. Even during her son's recruiting visit, Proctor's mother was steadfast, despite his insistence on playing for the Midshipmen and commiting to at least five years in the military after graduation.
SPORTS
By Benjamin Snyder, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
The Junior Tennis Champions Center at College Park aims to offer the young athletes it trains a chance to become just that - champions. While by definition it's a regional training center, Patrick McEnroe, general manager of player development for the United States Tennis Association, calls it "national in its own scope" and says it's "one of the biggest and one of the best. " The Tennis Center at College Park is the site of the Citi Open, a WTA international women's professional tennis tournament that begins Saturday and runs through July 31. But for much of the year the facility's main focus is on buiding future professionals.
NEWS
January 22, 2009
ROBERT DECAREAU, 82 Helped develop the microwave oven Robert Decareau, who helped invent the processes necessary to create the microwave oven, died Sunday in Amherst, Mass., after suffering from Alzheimer's disease for the past 17 years. Dr. Decareau worked for Raytheon after earning his doctorate in chemistry. It was there that he started working on microwave energy food applications, and he was one of the first to call himself a food scientist. His daughter, Karen Ross, said she remembered her father experimenting with a refrigerator-size prototype microwave oven in the family's basement in the 1960s.
NEWS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
It wasn't long after Calvert Hall put the finishing touches on a 31-1 season that Cardinals baseball coach Lou Eckerl began hearing questions about his best returning player. Specifically, he was asked if senior Joe Velleggia, a 6-foot-7, 230-pound catcher, would be a better fit at first base. "This whole offseason, people who believed Joe was too big to be a catcher would ask me about whether I was going to switch Joe from catcher to first base. Personally, I don't think it matters," Eckerl said.
NEWS
March 22, 2004
THE NOTION THAT soon there will be sleek, high-tech trains hurtling along at 300 miles per hour on a cushion of air, shuttling commuters between Baltimore and Washington, has long been a beguiling image. Magnetic levitation technology, or maglev, has also been accompanied by serious reservations. Is it feasible? Cost-effective? Safe? But those questions have never provided a reason to reject the maglev project. Rather, they are the reason why it must be studied further. Lawmakers need to find out as much as possible about its potential rewards and its risks.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 25, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Northrop Corp. is negotiating to lease one of its two Advanced Tactical Fighter prototypes to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for flight research, officials said.A loser in the competition with Lockheed Corp. for a fighter program that is expected to be worth up to $70 billion, Northrop would lease the plane to NASA for the life of the testing program.Details on the length of the program and leasing arrangements are being negotiated, Jim Hart, a Northrop spokesman, said yesterday.
NEWS
January 22, 2009
ROBERT DECAREAU, 82 Helped develop the microwave oven Robert Decareau, who helped invent the processes necessary to create the microwave oven, died Sunday in Amherst, Mass., after suffering from Alzheimer's disease for the past 17 years. Dr. Decareau worked for Raytheon after earning his doctorate in chemistry. It was there that he started working on microwave energy food applications, and he was one of the first to call himself a food scientist. His daughter, Karen Ross, said she remembered her father experimenting with a refrigerator-size prototype microwave oven in the family's basement in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2003
MOSCOW - At the recent gathering of fanatics here, there was a lot of talk about the coming Revolution. Nothing as passe, mind you, as the overthrow of the global capitalist system. No, at Moscow's Sixth International Autosalon, the masses were murmuring about the Revolution, a prototype its maker says will soon become the country's first mass-produced sports car. The sleek, low-slung vehicle has a single seat, can fly past communal farm tractors at more than 160 mph and is painted - what else?
FEATURES
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
He's a real American hero and that doesn't come cheap. The 1963 G.I. Joe action figure prototype sold for $200,000 to a private buyer last June after failing to fetch the $250,000 minimum bid at a San Diego comic book auction. "When I saw there was an opportunity to buy it post-sale, I jumped all over it," said the buyer, Steve Geppi, publisher of Baltimore magazine and owner of Diamond Comic Distributors in Timonium. "When you consider it's not just only the first G.I. Joe, but it's the first action figure prototype - this is kind of the Mona Lisa of toys."
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