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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Cecile M. Pickart, a Johns Hopkins scientist and teacher who worked to find treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's disease by studying a critical cellular protein, died Wednesday at her Tuscany-Canterbury home. She was 51. Diagnosed with kidney cancer four years ago, she died of the disease "wrapped in the shawl that all her former students gave her last summer with their names embroidered on it," said her partner, Jennifer Rose. A professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Pickart studied the protein ubiquitin, so named because it is found in all animal cells.
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FEATURES
By Contributing Writers | April 27, 1993
Our 13-year-old daughter announced that she is becoming a vegetarian. We're worried that this kind of diet will interfere with her growth.Many parents whose teen-agers decide to become vegetarians have concerns similar to yours. However, most teen-agers who adopt this lifestyle do just fine and in fact may be protecting themselves against various illnesses that begin to occur in middle age. The most important point is what kind of vegetarian your daughter decides to become.There are basically three kinds of vegetarian diets: partial, traditional and "new" or "atypical."
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Dallas Morning News | August 26, 1992
Interest in meatless dishes -- from cheese enchiladas t veggie burgers -- is definitely on the upswing.The National Restaurant Association says that a third or more of Americans who dine out are likely to order a vegetarian entree, according to a Gallup poll conducted in August for the group.But going meatless for a meal needn't mean skimping on flavor or appeal."I think that they (diners) are discovering meatless food has many advantages," says David Goldbeck, co-author with wife, Nikki, of five books on vegetarian eating.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 28, 1992
In 1985, Maria Patino of Spain was not allowed to compete in women's events at the World University Games. She flunked a test that showed she had the genes of a man -- even though she had every physical feature of a woman, and none of a man. Such an injustice will not be repeated at this year's summer Olympic Games in Barcelona.The International Olympic Committee's medical commission recently decided the best way to tell if a woman is, in fact, a woman is to check her genitalia to see if she is physically built like a woman.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2007
Tests start to look for melamine in food Search for melamine widens to human food WASHINGTON -- The government will begin a sweeping search of the country's food supply for the industrial chemical linked to the pet food scare, federal health officials announced yesterday. By the end of the week, inspectors will start testing for melamine in corn meal, rice bran and other protein products commonly used in bread, cereal and pasta eaten by humans. The expanded investigation comes as testing found the chemical in animals close to the human food supply - hogs at farms in California, North Carolina and South Carolina.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2004
Instead of gulping pills to regulate stress, why not try to eliminate it? I see commercials for diet pills that "regulate" cortisol levels. What is cortisol? Do these drugs work, and are they safe? Cortisol is a stress hormone. When the body is under chronic stress, cortisol levels spike and stay elevated. When high levels of the hormone are present, extra fat is deposited and stored in the abdominal area. As well as increasing the risk of heart trouble, high levels of the hormone have also been linked to sleep, memory and immunity problems.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it had paid about $120 million in stock for a company with rights to a technology designed to make protein drugs last longer in the body, potentially reducing dosages for patients. Human Genome's announcement that it had acquired Principia Pharmaceutical Corp., a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Norristown, Pa., comes as it makes significant progress in moving the first of its experimental gene-based drugs through development.
HEALTH
By Mary Gallagher, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Mary Gallagher, dietetic intern, weighs in nutrition guidelines. The MyPlate icon, seen on http://www.choosemyplate.gov , has replaced the USDA Food Pyramid as the premier guide to more healthful eating. The MyPlate message is designed around the five food groups people should eat every day: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy.
HEALTH
By Brian Bowers, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's Picture of Health blog. The latest post, reprinted here, is from dietetic intern Brian Bowers. In an ever-changing world of health information, it can be tough to decipher material as valid or phony. As a fitness enthusiast, you may search for nutrition advice that can provide you with ideas on how to get more energy, aid in muscle recovery and growth, or optimize overall athletic performance.
NEWS
By STACY KAPER and STACY KAPER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
On the farm Like many dairy farmers, Kate and David Dallam hire a nutritionist to regulate the feed for their cows. Well aware that proper diet is crucial for a cow's health and milk production, the Dallams, owners of Bloom's Broom Dairy in Bel Air, learn the fat and protein content from reports every few days from the cooperative that processes the milk. Correct protein levels in feed are important, experts said. Too little leads to low milk production, and too much can be an expensive waste of feed.
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