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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2007
Tests start to look for melamine in food Search for melamine widens to human food WASHINGTON -- The government will begin a sweeping search of the country's food supply for the industrial chemical linked to the pet food scare, federal health officials announced yesterday. By the end of the week, inspectors will start testing for melamine in corn meal, rice bran and other protein products commonly used in bread, cereal and pasta eaten by humans. The expanded investigation comes as testing found the chemical in animals close to the human food supply - hogs at farms in California, North Carolina and South Carolina.
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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2004
Instead of gulping pills to regulate stress, why not try to eliminate it? I see commercials for diet pills that "regulate" cortisol levels. What is cortisol? Do these drugs work, and are they safe? Cortisol is a stress hormone. When the body is under chronic stress, cortisol levels spike and stay elevated. When high levels of the hormone are present, extra fat is deposited and stored in the abdominal area. As well as increasing the risk of heart trouble, high levels of the hormone have also been linked to sleep, memory and immunity problems.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it had paid about $120 million in stock for a company with rights to a technology designed to make protein drugs last longer in the body, potentially reducing dosages for patients. Human Genome's announcement that it had acquired Principia Pharmaceutical Corp., a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Norristown, Pa., comes as it makes significant progress in moving the first of its experimental gene-based drugs through development.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 18, 1992
In case you haven't discovered it, let me tell you about an age-old grain that is migrating from health food stores to grocery store shelves.Some are even calling it the super grain of the future.That's ironic, considering that quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is an ancient grain that originated in the Andes region of South America. It was one of three staples of the Incas, along with maize (corn) and the potato. Although it was a significant source of protein in the Inca diet, it was overlooked by the Spanish explorers.
NEWS
By Kansas City Star | November 27, 1992
In laboratories across America, scientists work feverishly to create the perfect frozen pizza.Slathering pizza pies with a new wonder topping would ensure )) the crisp crusts they crave, a topping that would keep the tomato sauce from seeping into the bread dough prior to their arranged marriage at 425 degrees.That wonder topping: plastic.Not your basic petroleum-based Saran Wrap, but edible films made from corn, wheat, soybeans and other crops. Food wrap that melts in your mouth, adds protein and makes you feel good about the environment every time you bite into your jumbo supreme pizza.
NEWS
By STACY KAPER and STACY KAPER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
On the farm Like many dairy farmers, Kate and David Dallam hire a nutritionist to regulate the feed for their cows. Well aware that proper diet is crucial for a cow's health and milk production, the Dallams, owners of Bloom's Broom Dairy in Bel Air, learn the fat and protein content from reports every few days from the cooperative that processes the milk. Correct protein levels in feed are important, experts said. Too little leads to low milk production, and too much can be an expensive waste of feed.
HEALTH
By Brian Bowers, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's Picture of Health blog. The latest post, reprinted here, is from dietetic intern Brian Bowers. In an ever-changing world of health information, it can be tough to decipher material as valid or phony. As a fitness enthusiast, you may search for nutrition advice that can provide you with ideas on how to get more energy, aid in muscle recovery and growth, or optimize overall athletic performance.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Human Genome Sciences announced narrower fourth-quarter losses yesterday and said it expects to expand manufacturing operations and increase employment by about 50 percent to nearly 1,000 this year. The company, which said it would increase spending on research and development up to 70 percent in 2001, reported a fourth-quarter loss yesterday of $6 million, or 5 cents a share, on revenue of $5.3 million. That compares with a year-ago loss of $18 million, or 19 cents a share, on $862,000 in revenue.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
MAPPING the human genome, or genetic blueprint, has kindled hope that we can eventually select the genes we like and replace or suppress the ones we don't. But nature often has a good reason for keeping those bad genes and their proteins, and maintains a delicate balance of benefit and harm. Natural selection, it turns out, doesn't mean eliminating all the apparently unwelcome elements, because they may also have hidden virtues. That's what scientists at Baylor University found when looking at a protein known to be a potent cancer-fighter.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 4, 2004
If I have the energy, is there any reason not to exercise on an empty stomach? Al Douex Jr., an athletic trainer at Union Memorial Hospital, says that in general a short workout on an empty stomach is OK. However, if your goal is to tone muscle or burn fat, not eating something beforehand is a mistake. Without sufficient glycogen stores to convert to energy, it is unlikely you will have the strength or endurance to reach the fat-burning phase of your workout. While you don't need to indulge in a five-course meal, make sure you've eaten something (even just a banana or half a bagel)
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