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By Marie Bianco and Marie Bianco,Newsday | May 5, 1993
For many centuries, lentils have been considered a "poor man's food," a cheap and filling source of protein that was shunned by those who could afford to eat steak instead.But lentils are moving up the social ladder. Restaurant chefs are putting them on plates with costly salmon and quail. Nutritionists are taking a new look at this food that's high in complex carbohydrates, fiber and protein and low in sodium, fat and calories. And these legumes fit very nicely into the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Pyramid Guide, which suggests eating six to 11 servings a day of bread, cereal, rice and pasta for a healthful diet.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 18, 2006
Serena Fasano loves yogurt - she's particularly partial to a vanilla-flavored brand complemented by a chocolate-crunch topping. Her work on yogurt's anti-bacterial qualities has earned the 16-year-old Howard County high school senior a trip to the regional Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology, held at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh this weekend. "I just saw something that had always been there," Fasano said of her research, which focused on a protein in yogurt that blocks the growth of a particular kind of bacteria and which could hold promise for the treatment of intestinal diseases.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
The discovery of a defective gene that causes a common vascular aneurysm -- a balloonlike swelling in the aorta, the largest artery of the body -- was reported today by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia."
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
Q: My teen-age daughter has a friend whose mother sells vitamin products. She's convinced my daughter that for good health she needs a dozen or so vitamins daily, plus protein powder twice a day. This stuff will cost me a fortune! Does she really need them?A: Although adolescence is a period of rapid body growth, we can't produce any compelling evidence that your daughter needs any of these products. In saying this, we are assuming that your daughter is eating a well-balanced diet, something not all teen-agers do. If she is, the foods she is eating will provide all the essential nutrients she needs: protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber and vitamins.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The raw-food movement has grown in popularity among pet owners for a few years now, with people eschewing commercially produced food in favor of raw meats, vegetables, bones, and fruits for their furry family members. But a new study in the Journal of American Science says the same raw diet that works for zoo animals simply isn't enough for domesticated cats. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and The Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, in Omaha, Neb., published a new study last week that said cats, in particular, who eat a raw-food diet miss out on valuable nutrients and risk increased pathogens.
NEWS
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,NEWSDAY | August 24, 2004
Increasing the activity of a single gene turns a mere rodent into Mighty Mouse, according to a new study. California scientists have genetically engineered an animal that has more muscle, less fat and more physical endurance than its littermates - it runs twice as far as expected. "We were quite surprised," said Ronald M. Evans, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif. "Most people think that increased endurance comes from training. But we've been able to re-create this entire exercise network by increasing the activity of a single protein."
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | August 31, 2003
Any suggestions for getting into shape for mountain biking? Cristy Kirssin, Princeton Sports manager and an entry- level mountain biker herself, suggests varying your training. When she began, she started with 20- to 30-minute sessions on the stationary bike. Choose the "random" program, which will incorporate simulated hills. Spinning classes are also great for building endurance. In addition to cardiovascular work, Kirssin began strengthening her legs and arms (strong arms are important for maneuvering the bike on rough terrain and hills)
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Cecile M. Pickart, a Johns Hopkins scientist and teacher who worked to find treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's disease by studying a critical cellular protein, died Wednesday at her Tuscany-Canterbury home. She was 51. Diagnosed with kidney cancer four years ago, she died of the disease "wrapped in the shawl that all her former students gave her last summer with their names embroidered on it," said her partner, Jennifer Rose. A professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Pickart studied the protein ubiquitin, so named because it is found in all animal cells.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Dallas Morning News | August 26, 1992
Interest in meatless dishes -- from cheese enchiladas t veggie burgers -- is definitely on the upswing.The National Restaurant Association says that a third or more of Americans who dine out are likely to order a vegetarian entree, according to a Gallup poll conducted in August for the group.But going meatless for a meal needn't mean skimping on flavor or appeal."I think that they (diners) are discovering meatless food has many advantages," says David Goldbeck, co-author with wife, Nikki, of five books on vegetarian eating.
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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 28, 1992
In 1985, Maria Patino of Spain was not allowed to compete in women's events at the World University Games. She flunked a test that showed she had the genes of a man -- even though she had every physical feature of a woman, and none of a man. Such an injustice will not be repeated at this year's summer Olympic Games in Barcelona.The International Olympic Committee's medical commission recently decided the best way to tell if a woman is, in fact, a woman is to check her genitalia to see if she is physically built like a woman.
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