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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 28, 1992
In 1985, Maria Patino of Spain was not allowed to compete in women's events at the World University Games. She flunked a test that showed she had the genes of a man -- even though she had every physical feature of a woman, and none of a man. Such an injustice will not be repeated at this year's summer Olympic Games in Barcelona.The International Olympic Committee's medical commission recently decided the best way to tell if a woman is, in fact, a woman is to check her genitalia to see if she is physically built like a woman.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2007
Tests start to look for melamine in food Search for melamine widens to human food WASHINGTON -- The government will begin a sweeping search of the country's food supply for the industrial chemical linked to the pet food scare, federal health officials announced yesterday. By the end of the week, inspectors will start testing for melamine in corn meal, rice bran and other protein products commonly used in bread, cereal and pasta eaten by humans. The expanded investigation comes as testing found the chemical in animals close to the human food supply - hogs at farms in California, North Carolina and South Carolina.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2004
Instead of gulping pills to regulate stress, why not try to eliminate it? I see commercials for diet pills that "regulate" cortisol levels. What is cortisol? Do these drugs work, and are they safe? Cortisol is a stress hormone. When the body is under chronic stress, cortisol levels spike and stay elevated. When high levels of the hormone are present, extra fat is deposited and stored in the abdominal area. As well as increasing the risk of heart trouble, high levels of the hormone have also been linked to sleep, memory and immunity problems.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it had paid about $120 million in stock for a company with rights to a technology designed to make protein drugs last longer in the body, potentially reducing dosages for patients. Human Genome's announcement that it had acquired Principia Pharmaceutical Corp., a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Norristown, Pa., comes as it makes significant progress in moving the first of its experimental gene-based drugs through development.
NEWS
By STACY KAPER and STACY KAPER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
On the farm Like many dairy farmers, Kate and David Dallam hire a nutritionist to regulate the feed for their cows. Well aware that proper diet is crucial for a cow's health and milk production, the Dallams, owners of Bloom's Broom Dairy in Bel Air, learn the fat and protein content from reports every few days from the cooperative that processes the milk. Correct protein levels in feed are important, experts said. Too little leads to low milk production, and too much can be an expensive waste of feed.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Human Genome Sciences announced narrower fourth-quarter losses yesterday and said it expects to expand manufacturing operations and increase employment by about 50 percent to nearly 1,000 this year. The company, which said it would increase spending on research and development up to 70 percent in 2001, reported a fourth-quarter loss yesterday of $6 million, or 5 cents a share, on revenue of $5.3 million. That compares with a year-ago loss of $18 million, or 19 cents a share, on $862,000 in revenue.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 18, 2006
Serena Fasano loves yogurt - she's particularly partial to a vanilla-flavored brand complemented by a chocolate-crunch topping. Her work on yogurt's anti-bacterial qualities has earned the 16-year-old Howard County high school senior a trip to the regional Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology, held at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh this weekend. "I just saw something that had always been there," Fasano said of her research, which focused on a protein in yogurt that blocks the growth of a particular kind of bacteria and which could hold promise for the treatment of intestinal diseases.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
MAPPING the human genome, or genetic blueprint, has kindled hope that we can eventually select the genes we like and replace or suppress the ones we don't. But nature often has a good reason for keeping those bad genes and their proteins, and maintains a delicate balance of benefit and harm. Natural selection, it turns out, doesn't mean eliminating all the apparently unwelcome elements, because they may also have hidden virtues. That's what scientists at Baylor University found when looking at a protein known to be a potent cancer-fighter.
NEWS
By T. BERRY BRAZELTON, M.D. and T. BERRY BRAZELTON, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | August 6, 2000
Q. My 16-month -old daughter is a vegetarian. Most of her protein intake is from the 15 ounces of milk she drinks in her bottle daily. She has always been a poor eater. I'm trying to wean her off the bottle. At 8 months of age I began offering other liquids in a "sippy" cup, but she wouldn't drink much. I thought this would change, but she still will not drink any liquid if it's not in a bottle. When I tried the cold turkey method for about two days and did not give her the bottle, she only drank 3 ounces of fluid per day and no milk.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1999
Shares in Human Genome Sciences Inc. fell 13 percent yesterday as investors took profits and enthusiasm cooled for a gene breakthrough the biotechnology company announced Thursday.Shares in the Rockville-based company closed yesterday at $47.93, down $7.56. Trading was heavy with more than 3.6 million shares changing hands.The company disclosed Thursday that its scientists had discovered a human protein that triggers production of what are known as B cells. Those important white blood cells are responsible for signaling the body to start producing antibodies when invaders, such as bacteria and viruses, pose a threat.
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