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NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1999
In a breakthrough that could have dramatic implications for treating immune-system disorders and other diseases, scientists at a Maryland biotechnolgy company have discovered a natural trigger for producing one of the body's most important warriors against infection and disease.Scientists at Human Genome Sciences Inc. in Rockville said yesterday they are proceeding with development of an experimental drug based on the breakthrough and hope to see it tested in humans this year.Believing it might have a financial blockbuster on its hands, the company plans to make the drug's development a priority.
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BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 1, 2004
When the country goes on anti-fat mood swings, John B. Sanfilippo & Son Inc. suffers. The Elk Grove Village, Ill.-based nut company has endured several fat-fighting episodes, but until recently it never benefited from health trends. Because of such protein-rich diets as Atkins and new heart-healthy claims available to nut sellers, Americans are increasingly snacking on the treats, tossing them on salads and seeking prepackaged foods with nuts. "This has been really a unique period," said Jasper Sanfilippo, the company's chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
MedImmune, the Gaithersburg biotechnology company developing vaccines and other therapies for infectious diseases, said it has licensed a breakthrough discovery in its quest to develop a Lyme disease vaccine.The publicly held company said the vaccine it plans to develop from the discovery would be dramatically different from those under development now by the company and two competitors.Mark Kaufmann, a spokesman for MedImmune, said the company has assigned a high priority to developing a Lyme disease vaccine based on the discovery.
NEWS
By James F. Smith and James F. Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 1999
SAN ILDEFONSO, Mexico -- At just 1 month old, Maria Isabel Esquivel is chubby, smiling and alert, and her older brother and sisters now run with bounding strides through the family's tiny cornfield in this dirt-poor Indian village.The vigor of the Esquivel children brings to life the startling statistics that are emerging from several ambitious nutrition projects in the Mexican countryside.The goal is nothing short of transforming the humble tortilla, Mexico's corn-based staple food, into a protein-fortified "supertortilla" that would give a nutritional boost to the nearly 20 million Mexicans who live in extreme poverty.
HEALTH
By Sierra George, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post from Sierra George, dietetic intern, is printed here. Despite its name, the coconut is a fruit from the coconut palm. Tropical cultures have been using this delicious fruit for everything from food to body lotion and even currency. Until recently, Americans have seen coconut mostly as the dried, shredded ingredient of cookies, candies and cakes. Now, as more products derived from the coconut hit grocery store shelves, we are given the delicious opportunity to get creative with the coconut.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | November 16, 1993
American women can build stronger bones by eating small meat, chicken and fish portions.This sounds like heresy after years of weight-loss diets promoting 6- to 8-ounce "meat" portions at both lunch and dinner. But according to Creighton University's Robert Heaney, seven decades of research consistently show that high protein diets reduce calcium absorption.In November's Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Dr. Heaney says that whether your protein intake is high or low, every time you double your protein, you increase calcium loss by 50 percent.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
The discovery of a defective gene that causes a common vascular aneurysm -- a balloonlike swelling in the aorta, the largest artery of the body -- was reported today by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2004
Starting this month, fifty healthy men age 30 to 55 will be paid $5,000 each to spend 28 days in bed, just lolling around. They won't even be allowed up to go to the bathroom. The unusual study, at Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston, is designed to document just how debilitating bed rest is for muscles and bones - and to see whether resistance training with springs and pulleys, along with special protein supplements, can reverse this downward slide. The implications are huge - and not just for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which is funding the study to find ways to protect astronauts' muscles and bones on long space flights, such as those planned to Mars.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
Q: My teen-age daughter has a friend whose mother sells vitamin products. She's convinced my daughter that for good health she needs a dozen or so vitamins daily, plus protein powder twice a day. This stuff will cost me a fortune! Does she really need them?A: Although adolescence is a period of rapid body growth, we can't produce any compelling evidence that your daughter needs any of these products. In saying this, we are assuming that your daughter is eating a well-balanced diet, something not all teen-agers do. If she is, the foods she is eating will provide all the essential nutrients she needs: protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber and vitamins.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The raw-food movement has grown in popularity among pet owners for a few years now, with people eschewing commercially produced food in favor of raw meats, vegetables, bones, and fruits for their furry family members. But a new study in the Journal of American Science says the same raw diet that works for zoo animals simply isn't enough for domesticated cats. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and The Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, in Omaha, Neb., published a new study last week that said cats, in particular, who eat a raw-food diet miss out on valuable nutrients and risk increased pathogens.
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