Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProtein
IN THE NEWS

Protein

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1999
In a breakthrough that could have dramatic implications for treating immune-system disorders and other diseases, scientists at a Maryland biotechnolgy company have discovered a natural trigger for producing one of the body's most important warriors against infection and disease.Scientists at Human Genome Sciences Inc. in Rockville said yesterday they are proceeding with development of an experimental drug based on the breakthrough and hope to see it tested in humans this year.Believing it might have a financial blockbuster on its hands, the company plans to make the drug's development a priority.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 1, 2004
When the country goes on anti-fat mood swings, John B. Sanfilippo & Son Inc. suffers. The Elk Grove Village, Ill.-based nut company has endured several fat-fighting episodes, but until recently it never benefited from health trends. Because of such protein-rich diets as Atkins and new heart-healthy claims available to nut sellers, Americans are increasingly snacking on the treats, tossing them on salads and seeking prepackaged foods with nuts. "This has been really a unique period," said Jasper Sanfilippo, the company's chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
MedImmune, the Gaithersburg biotechnology company developing vaccines and other therapies for infectious diseases, said it has licensed a breakthrough discovery in its quest to develop a Lyme disease vaccine.The publicly held company said the vaccine it plans to develop from the discovery would be dramatically different from those under development now by the company and two competitors.Mark Kaufmann, a spokesman for MedImmune, said the company has assigned a high priority to developing a Lyme disease vaccine based on the discovery.
NEWS
By James F. Smith and James F. Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 1999
SAN ILDEFONSO, Mexico -- At just 1 month old, Maria Isabel Esquivel is chubby, smiling and alert, and her older brother and sisters now run with bounding strides through the family's tiny cornfield in this dirt-poor Indian village.The vigor of the Esquivel children brings to life the startling statistics that are emerging from several ambitious nutrition projects in the Mexican countryside.The goal is nothing short of transforming the humble tortilla, Mexico's corn-based staple food, into a protein-fortified "supertortilla" that would give a nutritional boost to the nearly 20 million Mexicans who live in extreme poverty.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | November 16, 1993
American women can build stronger bones by eating small meat, chicken and fish portions.This sounds like heresy after years of weight-loss diets promoting 6- to 8-ounce "meat" portions at both lunch and dinner. But according to Creighton University's Robert Heaney, seven decades of research consistently show that high protein diets reduce calcium absorption.In November's Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Dr. Heaney says that whether your protein intake is high or low, every time you double your protein, you increase calcium loss by 50 percent.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
Q: My teen-age daughter has a friend whose mother sells vitamin products. She's convinced my daughter that for good health she needs a dozen or so vitamins daily, plus protein powder twice a day. This stuff will cost me a fortune! Does she really need them?A: Although adolescence is a period of rapid body growth, we can't produce any compelling evidence that your daughter needs any of these products. In saying this, we are assuming that your daughter is eating a well-balanced diet, something not all teen-agers do. If she is, the foods she is eating will provide all the essential nutrients she needs: protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber and vitamins.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post, reprinted here, is from Shanti Lewis. "What diet should I follow?" is the most common question dietitians face. Dietitians seek foods that are nutrient-dense, budget-friendly and versatile. After surveying the group of dietitians at the University of Maryland Medical Center, it appears that there are five common foods that all of us keep on hand that meet that criteria: old-fashioned oats, nonfat plain Greek yogurt, fresh or frozen leafy vegetables, canned or dried beans/lentils, and unsalted nuts/seeds/natural nut butters.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Dallas Morning News | August 26, 1992
Interest in meatless dishes -- from cheese enchiladas t veggie burgers -- is definitely on the upswing.The National Restaurant Association says that a third or more of Americans who dine out are likely to order a vegetarian entree, according to a Gallup poll conducted in August for the group.But going meatless for a meal needn't mean skimping on flavor or appeal."I think that they (diners) are discovering meatless food has many advantages," says David Goldbeck, co-author with wife, Nikki, of five books on vegetarian eating.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 28, 1992
In 1985, Maria Patino of Spain was not allowed to compete in women's events at the World University Games. She flunked a test that showed she had the genes of a man -- even though she had every physical feature of a woman, and none of a man. Such an injustice will not be repeated at this year's summer Olympic Games in Barcelona.The International Olympic Committee's medical commission recently decided the best way to tell if a woman is, in fact, a woman is to check her genitalia to see if she is physically built like a woman.
HEALTH
By Jessica DeCostole, For The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). The latest post is from Jessica DeCostole, a dietetic intern. Summer is the season for shedding layers and showing a little more skin. It's also the time when many of us start to seek out quick weight loss strategies. Before you pick up that new diet book, read on for the dos and don'ts of summer weight loss.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.