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January 5, 2014
Ann Roberts wrote about how upset she was with confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and wondered "how humans can ignore and accept" the animal cruelty practiced on chickens and other feed animals ("Pollution is just the beginning of the problem with CAFOs," Dec. 30). Perhaps she might find a bit of pity for human animals who often rely on reasonably priced chicken for their protein needs. Being kinder to feed animals who will still be slaughtered is more costly and may price food out of people's reach, sending them to macaroni and cheese or junk food to fill their bellies.
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HEALTH
By Brian Bowers, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's Picture of Health blog. The latest post, reprinted here, is from dietetic intern Brian Bowers. In an ever-changing world of health information, it can be tough to decipher material as valid or phony. As a fitness enthusiast, you may search for nutrition advice that can provide you with ideas on how to get more energy, aid in muscle recovery and growth, or optimize overall athletic performance.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 8, 1992
Q: My son had a physical for high school basketball. They checked his urine and found a little bit of protein. Should we worry?A: Chances are there is nothing wrong with your son's health, but we would need some additional information to reassure you completely.Sometimes, protein in the urine can be a sign of kidney problems. Some teen-agers, however, will have a bit of protein in the urine after exercising. Even in the absence of exercise, it is not unusual for otherwise healthy adolescents to have a small amount of protein in their urine; the cause of this is unknown.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post, reprinted here, is from Shanti Lewis. "What diet should I follow?" is the most common question dietitians face. Dietitians seek foods that are nutrient-dense, budget-friendly and versatile. After surveying the group of dietitians at the University of Maryland Medical Center, it appears that there are five common foods that all of us keep on hand that meet that criteria: old-fashioned oats, nonfat plain Greek yogurt, fresh or frozen leafy vegetables, canned or dried beans/lentils, and unsalted nuts/seeds/natural nut butters.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | June 8, 1993
Q: I'm concerned that my 12-year-old daughter is not getting enough protein in her diet. She'll eat fruits, vegetables, chicken and some fish but hardly any red meat. Won't a lack of protein interfere with her growth?A: You're right to want to assure a healthy diet for your daughter, since at age 12 she is most likely in a period of rapid growth. And in order for her to grow properly, she will need adequate amounts of protein.However, the average American teen-ager probably consumes more protein than she really needs.
NEWS
By Tom Avril and Tom Avril,MCCLATCHEY-TRIBUNE | October 13, 2006
Doctors have known for years that some people with Lou Gehrig's disease also suffer from a type of dementia. And some with that dementia also develop crippling symptoms such as Lou Gehrig's, gradually losing control of their muscles. Today, a team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists reports the discovery of a likely culprit in both. The two distinct diseases are marked by an abnormal accumulation of the same protein - a startling two-for-one discovery described in the journal Science.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
As the nutrition coach for groups of runners training for the San Francisco Marathon last July and the Walt Disney World Marathon in January 1995, I was surprised at what they didn't know.They know they need plenty of carbos for energy. And they're aggressive about reducing fat for weight control. But they seem to have forgotten about protein. No wonder they're always tired.Protein from beans, lean meat, poultry and dairy products is essential to build muscle and repair damage from hard training, make red blood cells to carry oxygen for exercise, and create the enzymes and hormones that turn food into energy and coordinate body functions.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
From the mailbag:I'd love to start cooking meatless meals for all the obvious health reasons, but feel confused about the complete/incomplete protein issues. How should I mix rice, grains and beans?Relax, and cook to your heart's content. Back in the '70s, Frances Moore Lappe interested health-oriented cooks with her classic vegetarian treatise, "Diet for a Small Planet." But she made it harder than it has to be.It is true that most plant foods fall short in one or more of the essential amino acids.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | July 8, 1997
High-protein diets, America's latest food fad, are like an overstuffed deli sandwich -- some healthy nuggets here and there surrounded by a fair amount of unhealthful baloney.That, at least, is the view of mainstream nutritionists, many of whom feel that Americans hooked on books like "The Zone," by Barry Sears, "Protein Power," by Drs. Michael and Mary Dan Eades, and "Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution" are being fed a mixture of truths, half-truths and totally unproven assertions.For years, nutritionists have urged us to eat less fat and more complex carbohydrates so that we'll have fewer heart attacks and be generally more slim, healthy and vigorous.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 16, 1993
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have discovered what they believe to be the mechanism of memory loss in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The finding potentially opens the door to the development of new drugs that can halt memory deterioration in such disorders.The discovery, reported today in the journal Science, may also lead to a new understanding of the growth and death of cells during the development of the brain early in life.Dr. Dale E. Bredesen, a UCLA gerontologist, and his colleagues have found that a protein on the surface of key memory cells kills the cells unless a brain hormone called nerve growth factor, or NGF, is bound to, or locked onto, that protein.
NEWS
January 5, 2014
Ann Roberts wrote about how upset she was with confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and wondered "how humans can ignore and accept" the animal cruelty practiced on chickens and other feed animals ("Pollution is just the beginning of the problem with CAFOs," Dec. 30). Perhaps she might find a bit of pity for human animals who often rely on reasonably priced chicken for their protein needs. Being kinder to feed animals who will still be slaughtered is more costly and may price food out of people's reach, sending them to macaroni and cheese or junk food to fill their bellies.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
MC Savage from Baltimore said she is trying to find ways to get more nutrient-packed beans in her diet and was hoping for a recipe for a three-bean salad that was a little bit different from the classic versions that most commonly have a dressing made with vinegar, oil and sugar. Debbie Sullivan, also from Baltimore, shared a recipe for a Mexican-style bean salad that she thought Savage would enjoy. Her recipe includes chicken or turkey but she said it is equally good made without it. What's nice about this dish is that it comes together in minutes and is extremely adaptable.
HEALTH
By Jessica DeCostole, For The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). The latest post is from Jessica DeCostole, a dietetic intern. Summer is the season for shedding layers and showing a little more skin. It's also the time when many of us start to seek out quick weight loss strategies. Before you pick up that new diet book, read on for the dos and don'ts of summer weight loss.
HEALTH
By Sierra George, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post from Sierra George, dietetic intern, is printed here. Despite its name, the coconut is a fruit from the coconut palm. Tropical cultures have been using this delicious fruit for everything from food to body lotion and even currency. Until recently, Americans have seen coconut mostly as the dried, shredded ingredient of cookies, candies and cakes. Now, as more products derived from the coconut hit grocery store shelves, we are given the delicious opportunity to get creative with the coconut.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The raw-food movement has grown in popularity among pet owners for a few years now, with people eschewing commercially produced food in favor of raw meats, vegetables, bones, and fruits for their furry family members. But a new study in the Journal of American Science says the same raw diet that works for zoo animals simply isn't enough for domesticated cats. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and The Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, in Omaha, Neb., published a new study last week that said cats, in particular, who eat a raw-food diet miss out on valuable nutrients and risk increased pathogens.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
As people look to live more healthful lifestyles, many are contemplating meat-free diets. But becoming vegan or vegetarian can seem daunting as people try to figure out what to eat to get all the proper nutrients. Ingrid Beardsley, registered dietitian at MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, said the transition can be done with proper planning. What is vegan and how is it different from being a vegetarian? Vegans exclude all meat, fish, dairy, and eggs, meaning no animal products at all. Some vegans choose to avoid consuming animal products, while others avoid using animal products completely.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 7, 1992
Mother's milk contains an acid-based protein that combats a major cause of life-threatening diarrhea in infants, a team led by a Johns Hopkins researcher reported yesterday.Another team of scientists, also led by a Hopkins researcher, said they have found that a new nose-drop flu vaccine, unlike the standard flu shot, is effective in infants between the ages of 2 months and 6 months.Both findings were issued yesterday at the combined annual meeting in Baltimore of three groups: the American Pediatric Society, the Society for Pediatric Research and the Ambulatory Pediatric Association.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University say they've found that a protein used to predict heart disease may also be a warning sign for colon cancer, a disease that afflicts 150,000 Americans and kills 50,000 annually. High levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, in a patient's blood "could become a very good early marker" for predicting the colon disorder, said Northwestern University cancer specialist Dr. Boris Pasche. The findings also bolster the theory that inflammation plays a role in some cancers, as well as a host of other chronic ailments, including heart disease and diabetes.
HEALTH
By Mary Gallagher, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Mary Gallagher, dietetic intern, weighs in nutrition guidelines. The MyPlate icon, seen on http://www.choosemyplate.gov , has replaced the USDA Food Pyramid as the premier guide to more healthful eating. The MyPlate message is designed around the five food groups people should eat every day: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy.
HEALTH
By Mindy Athas and Picture of Health contributor | December 28, 2011
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post on healthful eating. This week, Mindy Athas, RD, CSO, LDN, writes about mushrooms. Low in calories, fat, cholesterol and sodium, yet rich in fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals, mushrooms really are magical. Consider adding them to your table in a myriad of delicious ways. For a majestic start, consider stuffed mushroom caps or try a wild mushroom soup. An easy meal can be pasta and sauteed shiitakes or a salad entree topped with white buttons or criminis.
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