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Protective Orders

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NEWS
January 2, 2007
Hardly a week goes by without news of a Maryland resident who has been murdered or seriously injured in an act of domestic violence where a protective order had been issued against the attacker. In a recent incident, police shot a 25-year-old Kent County man who had forced his way into the apartment of his girlfriend and held their toddler hostage. Domestic violence is the No. 1 cause of physical injury suffered by women and, according to studies, requires more medical care for them than rape, muggings and car accidents combined.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | January 23, 2000
Most of Carroll County's workers travel to other counties to do their jobs. There hasn't been much change in that situation in recent years. Carroll's still a bedroom suburb, overlaid on a shrinking farming community. So how long is your commute? Fifteen minutes, an hour each way? What's the longest time you would drive to work and still live in Carroll County? How about seven hours roundtrip to Salisbury? David Barcroft of Hampstead faces that prospect, and he has gone to court to stop his employer, the Maryland State Police, from ordering his transfer.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Victims of domestic violence would enjoy stronger legal protections under legislation passed Thursday by the House of Delegates. House members voted overwhelmingly for a trio of bills proposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley that would make it easier for a domestic violence victim to get a protective order from a court, expand the circumstances under which such orders could be issued and impose an extra penalty of up to five years for domestic violence in...
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
Changes in Maryland's domestic violence laws, which took effect yesterday, give judges added leverage to use protective orders to bar abusers from assaulting or harassing their victims.The modifications in the Family Law Article permit judges to issue a protective order for up to 12 months -- an increase from the previous maximum of 200 days -- and give authority for a protective order to be extended for an additional six months.In Carroll County, where three people were killed in Hampstead during two unrelated domestic violence incidents in May and June, State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes applauded the changes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 30, 1999
About 30 percent of protective orders issued by Maryland judges are not entered into a statewide computer database used to prevent people accused of domestic abuse from buying handguns, a sampling by federal prosecutors has found.The omissions could indicate a failure of what is meant to be an extensive system designed to protect victims of violence from angry spouses or loved ones.Problems were discovered by Lynne A. Battaglia, the U.S. attorney for Maryland, whose office studied a sampling of protective orders issued by judges in each of the state's jurisdictions from April through July.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece and C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | May 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer signed legislation yesterday that will add new protections for battered women in Maryland -- and could save lives.The new domestic violence law, which goes into effect Oct. 1, allows many more women to obtain protective orders against abusive husbands and lovers.And the orders may be imposed for up to 200 days. The limit of such orders under current law is 30 days -- far less than in most states.Judy A. Wolfer, legal clinic director at the House of Ruth, a refuge for battered women, called the new domestic violence law "a great step in the right direction" -- but she said many states are still far ahead of Maryland.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin, Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin, Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper,Sun reporters | September 18, 2007
Jeffrey Jacobsen buckled his young sons into his sport utility vehicle and was about to drive away from the Timonium home he once shared with his estranged wife when he paused, the man's father recalled. Jacobsen asked his father, who was sitting beside him, to tell his wife to come outside. He said he had a question for her. As Jessica Jacobsen approached the vehicle, her husband quickly got out, shot his wife in the chest with a handgun and ran into the house, his father, Reginald Jacobsen, recalled yesterday.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Victims of domestic violence would enjoy stronger legal protections under legislation passed Thursday by the House of Delegates. House members voted overwhelmingly for a trio of bills proposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley that would make it easier for a domestic violence victim to get a protective order from a court, expand the circumstances under which such orders could be issued and impose an extra penalty of up to five years for domestic violence in...
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2001
The number of people trying to buy handguns illegally by lying on application forms has decreased significantly in recent months, state officials say. Even as those numbers drop, the Maryland State Police and attorney general's office have teamed to prosecute those lying on applications about restraining orders, which are usually issued to shield women from abusive or threatening spouses. "If someone makes a blatant misrepresentation, we're going to find out about it," Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Two top Democrats vying to become governor on Friday pitched competing proposals to curb domestic violence, telling legislators current laws do not go far enough to protect children. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, pitched three bills backed by the O'Malley administration, including one that would make it a crime to commit an act of domestic violence in front of a child. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler testified on a similar proposal that would make it a crime to commit any act of violence in front of children who are at least two-years-old.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
Maryland has made significant progress in recent years toward reducing cases of domestic violence against women and children in the state. During the last decade, domestic violence assaults have fallen 20 percent, and homicides of women and children attributable to domestic assaults dropped by 32 percent. But glaring weaknesses remain in the law, and we urge legislators to further strengthen the protections courts can extend to the victims of abuse. A package of bills sponsored by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in this year's General Assembly would give prosecutors and judges greater power to deter such crimes and hold their perpetrators accountable.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Brandy King wants a judge to order her abusive ex-husband not to contact her ever again. But as Maryland law now stands, the courts can't do that. King asked a state Senate committee Tuesday to change the law as she testified in support of legislation, backed by the O'Malley administration, to tighten Maryland's domestic violence statutes. One bill would allow her to obtain a permanent protective order against her former husband, who was convicted of assaulting her, before he is released from jail.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
An attempt by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler to pivot from character concerns to issues in the increasingly nasty gubernatorial contest yielded more vitriol Tuesday as Gansler accused a rival, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, of putting politics ahead of protecting women from domestic violence. Brown's camp came right back as Del. Cheryl Glenn of Baltimore, an ally of the lieutenant governor and a former victim of abuse, charged that Gansler was using the issue to "score cheap political points.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Victoria Vernetta Glover had taken the available legal steps to protect herself from an allegedly abusive husband but was killed nonetheless. Police say Cory Bowman shot his estranged wife this week outside her Parkville home as she was putting her 3-year-old son in a car. In recent months, she had filed for divorce, citing cruelty as grounds, obtained a protective order and pressed assault charges on which Bowman was out on bail. He was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound in a Baltimore apartment a day after her killing, police confirmed Thursday.
NEWS
By Dorothy Lennig, Judith A. Wolfer and Deena Hausner | May 6, 2013
It takes incredible courage for a victim of domestic violence to apply for a protective order. Victims must make their way to the courthouse, often while they are still experiencing the effects of their abuse. At the courthouse, they must write a description of how they were abused, and then describe their abuse again to a judge, often in front of a courtroom filled with strangers. If the judge determines that there has been abuse, the judge will issue a temporary protective order that must be served by a law enforcement officer on the alleged abuser.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
In a victory for battered women, Maryland's highest court ruled yesterday that a judge must consider an alleged abuser's track record when weighing a request for a protective order.Experts say the Court of Appeals ruling adds teeth to Maryland's domestic violence statute by spelling out for the first time factors that judges must consider when they rule on the estimated 14,000 requests for protective orders filed each year.The 16-year-old law allows spouses, blood relatives and anyone who lives with an abusive partner to file a petition for a protective order in any District Court or Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Leigh Goodmark | March 26, 2013
Those of us who appear regularly in the North Avenue courthouse, where Baltimore City's domestic violence cases are heard, were already aware of the "spike" in domestic violence homicides noted recently by The Sun. We knew that some of those women had asked for the legal system's protection, and that some had not received it. But some of us also knew that even if they had gotten protective orders, or pressed charges, or participated in prosecution, those...
NEWS
February 15, 2013
The article "Woman was killed despite police watch" (Feb. 7) shows why firearms are necessary for individual protection. A woman and her unborn child were murdered by "a former boyfriend who had been threatening her for years. " She was "under police watch and had sought a court order for protection against her alleged killer. " "She was in the apartment with at least two children" when she was stabbed to death. Tragically, neither the police, the correctional system, nor the courts were able to protect this woman.
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