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By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
Sidney Ponson, the former Orioles' pitching ace jailed this week on a drunken driving conviction, requested that he serve his five-day sentence in protective custody at the Central Booking and Intake Center in Baltimore, according to state prison officials and his attorney. State officials confirmed yesterday that they had granted the request. Arthur Alperstein, Ponson's attorney, said it was normal for someone who has a "high profile" to be segregated from the jail's general population.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
You Don't Say is about to go silent for several days, along with my Twitter and Facebook accounts. Don't be alarmed; it's only temporary, and it's not for protective custody or a treatment facility or anything alarming. I will simply be non-electronic for several days. Rather than leave you adrift, I commend to you Mark Allen's (you do follow @EditorMark, don't you?) "Archive of tweeted tips," which should afford you considerable entertainment and instruction. The estimable Stan Carey has addressed the split-infinitive superstition at some length at "How awkwardly to avoid split infinitives.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
Susan M. Fila, the Baltimore lawyer charged with plotting to kill her law firm partner, has been placed in protective custody at the Baltimore City Detention Center as a result of a newspaper article identifying her as a drug informant, a corrections official said.Ms. Fila -- who last week was assaulted at the jail in a fight over a pack of cigarettes -- was moved into a higher-security area of the jail yesterday morning, said LaMont Flanagan, the commissioner the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2008
As details emerged about three youngsters apparently drowned by their father in a downtown hotel room over the weekend, legal experts and family advocates questioned whether Maryland law goes far enough to protect children in custody disputes. Some argue that judges are too quick to dismiss women's claims of abuse and too willing to award unsupervised visitation - even if one parent has a history of mental illness or battering the other. Amy Castillo, whose estranged husband, Mark Castillo, allegedly confessed to the killings, said in court documents that her husband had threatened to make her suffer by killing their children.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
KARACHI, Pakistan - Three witnesses were taken into protective custody yesterday and were being questioned about a car bomb explosion that killed at least 11 people outside the U.S. Consulate on Friday, police here said. They said the witnesses include a taxi passenger, an Islamic seminary student who was walking in the area, and a security guard who was posted in a park near the consulate compound. Investigators also said they were pursuing a theory that a remote-controlled bomb had been hidden in a Toyota Corolla that belonged to a driving school and regularly passed the consulate.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
A suspended Baltimore police officer convicted of killing a woman who was pregnant with his baby and her 5-year-old daughter in Harford County was sentenced yesterday to consecutive life terms in prison.Michael Edward Thompson avoided the death penalty by pleading guilty last month to the murders of Vicky Lee Austin and her daughter Jessica Elaine Morgan on April 13, 1998, at their home in rural Street, about nine miles north of Bel Air. Armed with a semiautomatic rifle and a 12-gauge shotgun, Thompson blasted his way into the bathroom as the mother bathed her kindergartner and repeatedly shot them at close range.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff Kelly Gilbert contributed to this story | April 29, 1991
Fifteen inmates at the Maryland Penitentiary have gone to court to stop state prison officials from moving them out of solitary confinement and into the general population, where they claim they would be in danger.In four lawsuits filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore over the last three weeks, the inmates claim that they fear living in close contact with other prisoners in the general population."I told them I had enemies in the general population . . . and that I was in fear for my safety," inmate William A. Niewiadomski wrote in his lawsuit.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2003
BOSTON - The prison inmate who fatally strangled a central figure in the worldwide clerical abuse scandal said he stalked pedophile priest John J. Geoghan for more than a month and considered him "a prize," a district attorney said yesterday. "It certainly was intentional on the part of the defendant," said John J. Conte, the district attorney in Worcester, west of Boston. Conte said Joseph L. Druce admitted the killing and said he acted alone. The prosecutor described the 38-year-old convicted murderer as "filled with long-standing hate."
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | November 22, 1991
A 38-year-old man has been charged with killing his 17-year-old son, who was in protective custody at a Northwest Baltimore foster home and waiting to testify that the man had sexually abused his daughter, police said.Lawrence Sarmartaney Banks, who lived in the 1600 block of East Federal Street, was charged with first-degree murder and a handgun violation in connection with the slaying of Lawrence Foster. Banks was held at the Baltimore Detention Center last night and was scheduled to have a bail hearing today.
NEWS
August 23, 1992
Brooklyn Park Burger King robbedTwo men armed with a handgun robbed a Brooklyn Park Burger King Thursday night, getting away with an undetermined amount of money after forcing the manager into a walk-in freezer.Police said the men walked into the restaurant, in the 5500 block of Ritchie Highway, about 10:30 p.m. and ordered some food.After paying, police said, the men threatened the manager, Nils A. Canter, with a handgun and demanded that he open the safe.After stuffing money from the safe and the cash registers into a pink pillow case, the men forced Mr. Canter, 58, into a walk-in freezer.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | February 12, 2008
While medical staff at the Baltimore County jail continue to watch over the Cockeysville teenager charged with killing his family this month, Nicholas W. Browning was indicted yesterday on murder and handgun charges. A Baltimore County grand jury indicted the 16-year-old on four counts of first-degree murder and four counts of using a handgun in a violent crime. Browning is being held without bail at the Baltimore County Detention Center, where he is on "special watch," said Jim O'Neill, the director of the county's corrections department and warden of the jail.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
Sidney Ponson, the former Orioles' pitching ace jailed this week on a drunken driving conviction, requested that he serve his five-day sentence in protective custody at the Central Booking and Intake Center in Baltimore, according to state prison officials and his attorney. State officials confirmed yesterday that they had granted the request. Arthur Alperstein, Ponson's attorney, said it was normal for someone who has a "high profile" to be segregated from the jail's general population.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 2005
With their daughter near death, the parents of Terri Schiavo saw their legal options to prolong her life all but disappear yesterday as the U.S. Supreme Court refused to order that her feeding tube be reinserted and a Florida judge blocked an effort by state officials to take the severely brain-damaged woman into protective custody. Refusing to give up, Schiavo's parents again asked a federal judge in Tampa, Fla., to intervene. With their supporters, they also looked to the slim chance that Gov. Jeb Bush would ignore court rulings and use his executive powers to have her feeding tube replaced.
NEWS
September 17, 2004
Granville Creek remains closed after sewage spill The emergency closure of Granville Creek in Riva remains in effect this week after a valve failure caused wastewater to spill into the creek. Officials with the Anne Arundel County Department of Health are warning anyone who comes in contact with the creek water to wash with soap and warm water. The Health Department has lifted its advisory for the Sylvan Shores area of South River. According to water samples taken by the department, the water is in good condition -- meeting Environmental Protection Agency standards.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2003
BOSTON - The prison inmate who fatally strangled a central figure in the worldwide clerical abuse scandal said he stalked pedophile priest John J. Geoghan for more than a month and considered him "a prize," a district attorney said yesterday. "It certainly was intentional on the part of the defendant," said John J. Conte, the district attorney in Worcester, west of Boston. Conte said Joseph L. Druce admitted the killing and said he acted alone. The prosecutor described the 38-year-old convicted murderer as "filled with long-standing hate."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
KARACHI, Pakistan - Three witnesses were taken into protective custody yesterday and were being questioned about a car bomb explosion that killed at least 11 people outside the U.S. Consulate on Friday, police here said. They said the witnesses include a taxi passenger, an Islamic seminary student who was walking in the area, and a security guard who was posted in a park near the consulate compound. Investigators also said they were pursuing a theory that a remote-controlled bomb had been hidden in a Toyota Corolla that belonged to a driving school and regularly passed the consulate.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | December 31, 1993
Baltimore County jail inmates, following their own moral code, have made life hard for a former county recreation supervisor who pleaded guilty to fondling an 11-year-old boy who was on his soccer team.So the former supervisor, Ronald Kiewe, 35, traded the relative freedom of a 60-day sentence in a work-release program for the virtual isolation of "protective custody," where he spends 23 hours a day alone in a six-by-eight-foot cell at the county detention center.But Circuit Judge J. Norris Byrnes, who sentenced Kiewe on Nov. 29 after his guilty plea on a third-degree sex offense, refused to change Kiewe's sentence to home detention yesterday after a plea by the prisoner's lawyer.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
You Don't Say is about to go silent for several days, along with my Twitter and Facebook accounts. Don't be alarmed; it's only temporary, and it's not for protective custody or a treatment facility or anything alarming. I will simply be non-electronic for several days. Rather than leave you adrift, I commend to you Mark Allen's (you do follow @EditorMark, don't you?) "Archive of tweeted tips," which should afford you considerable entertainment and instruction. The estimable Stan Carey has addressed the split-infinitive superstition at some length at "How awkwardly to avoid split infinitives.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
A suspended Baltimore police officer convicted of killing a woman who was pregnant with his baby and her 5-year-old daughter in Harford County was sentenced yesterday to consecutive life terms in prison.Michael Edward Thompson avoided the death penalty by pleading guilty last month to the murders of Vicky Lee Austin and her daughter Jessica Elaine Morgan on April 13, 1998, at their home in rural Street, about nine miles north of Bel Air. Armed with a semiautomatic rifle and a 12-gauge shotgun, Thompson blasted his way into the bathroom as the mother bathed her kindergartner and repeatedly shot them at close range.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 5, 1996
ANNAPOLIS -- On the night of April 15, with rain falling hard in Pasadena, Aca Anderson and Theresa Clifford knew there would be flooding in Glen Burnie. They live together in Pasadena but have a second house in Glen Burnie, where the roof leaked and the buckets they'd placed on the floor would be overflowing from the evening's downpour.So they decided to drive to Glen Burnie and bail. Andersondrove, since Clifford has no license. But she tagged along, since he has a bad back and can't bend, and she would have to do the bailing.
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