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Protectionism

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NEWS
March 25, 1999
This is an excerpt of a Los Angeles Times editorial that was published yesterday:LAST month, Washington determined that Japan, Brazil and Russia were selling steel in the United States at less than fair value and causing injury to the domestic industry. The Clinton administration slapped prohibitive duties on Japanese and Brazilian steel and forced Russia to restrict its exports -- a tough but fair response. But it was not enough for the steel industry or for the House, which recklessly voted to limit all steel imports.
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EXPLORE
August 10, 2012
The decision regarding the liquor license at the Wegmans store by the Howard County Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board is absurd and infuriating ("No license for liquor store at Wegmans," Aug. 2.) The only purpose Maryland's liquor laws serve is protectionism. and this decision certainly smacks of protectionism. The board's reasons for rejection are spurious: • "Not necessary for the accommodation of the public…" I would find the ability to purchased alcoholic beverages while parked at Wegmans very convenient.
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EXPLORE
August 10, 2012
The decision regarding the liquor license at the Wegmans store by the Howard County Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board is absurd and infuriating ("No license for liquor store at Wegmans," Aug. 2.) The only purpose Maryland's liquor laws serve is protectionism. and this decision certainly smacks of protectionism. The board's reasons for rejection are spurious: • "Not necessary for the accommodation of the public…" I would find the ability to purchased alcoholic beverages while parked at Wegmans very convenient.
NEWS
By Nigel Sheinwald | June 8, 2009
International commerce and openness are in the British bloodstream. They have been the foundation of our economy since the Industrial Revolution. Today trade remains the cornerstone of the U.K. economy and a crucial factor in America's success too. Yet in the current economic turmoil, it can be hard for governments to keep their eyes on the prize of economic recovery as our traditional industries suffer, jobs are lost and each country struggles to...
NEWS
March 27, 1996
BUSINESS AND POLITICAL leaders agree that Maryland must improve its business climate. There's much hand-wringing over the loss of jobs to other states. Numbing regulation looms, alongside taxation, as one of the twin evils. So why are a substantial number of legislators intent on chasing a huge used car operation proposed by Circuit City to Virginia for the sake of an antiquated mandate that many thought had expired with Earth shoes?There is no reason -- save for naked protectionism -- for Maryland to kiss off CarMax's proposal to open a late-model used car dealership with 300 employees in Howard County.
NEWS
March 13, 2009
Many Americans struggling through the current recession would be happy to endorse the "Buy America" provision in the recently passed stimulus bill. Clothing made in China, cars produced in Japan and store shelves stocked with imports provoke disgruntled complaints about lower-paid foreign workers. But our protective instincts are largely misguided. This country is too closely tied to the global economy to dig itself out of the current trouble without helping our trading partners recover too. Still, only 35 percent of the public thinks trade agreements have been good for the country, a recent survey shows.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
For decades, we took for granted that everyone agreed with us economists that free trade is good, protectionism is bad. Somewhere along the way, that stopped being the conventional wisdom."
NEWS
By ROBERT RENO | February 3, 1993
Does there beat beneath the breast of William Jefferson Clinton the heart of a raving protectionist?The world was given good cause to ponder the question last week. President Clinton took the first major economic initiative of his new administration and what was it? A tariff -- ranging as high as 109 percent -- on flat rolled and plate steel from 19 of the nation's most intimate trading partners. This is a provocative act that amounts in many cases to a de facto embargo.This week he followed up by barring European companies from bidding on government contracts.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A man of laughter and passion, Pat Buchanan brims with the cheerful pugnacity of a one-man church-militant in an unconverted world. Unfortunately, he currently overflows with nonsense.Recently this column noted, with reference to, among other things, his advocacy of protectionism, that he resembles high-tax statist liberals, advocating industrial policy, economic planning and favor-dispensing by a paternalistic government that knows better than consumers do what consumers ought to consume.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 15, 1992
Paris. The United States found itself without friends at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro last week. This was unhappily consistent with its increasingly isolated position in world trade disputes. More and more, Washington is the outsider.Whatever the merits of the American arguments in these environmental and trade controversies, the outsider's role is a dangerous one to choose to play. The U.S. no longer is economically invulnerable.The U.S. government's opposition in Rio both to an international agreement on reducing so-called greenhouse gases and to a biodiversity protection treaty derived from a wish to protect American business from what it considers undue restrictions, but also, in the latter case, to give the American pharmaceutical industry an advantage its foreign rivals would lack.
NEWS
March 13, 2009
Many Americans struggling through the current recession would be happy to endorse the "Buy America" provision in the recently passed stimulus bill. Clothing made in China, cars produced in Japan and store shelves stocked with imports provoke disgruntled complaints about lower-paid foreign workers. But our protective instincts are largely misguided. This country is too closely tied to the global economy to dig itself out of the current trouble without helping our trading partners recover too. Still, only 35 percent of the public thinks trade agreements have been good for the country, a recent survey shows.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
For decades, we took for granted that everyone agreed with us economists that free trade is good, protectionism is bad. Somewhere along the way, that stopped being the conventional wisdom."
NEWS
By P. J. CROWLEY | February 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Criticism of a proposed merger that would give a United Arab Emirates company control of operations at six U.S. ports, including Baltimore, misses the point. The deal between Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co. and Dubai Ports World (DPW) merits close scrutiny, but strategically should be viewed as a long-term security asset, not a liability. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Democrats and Republicans in Congress are right to ask tough questions about the merger. The Bush administration must demonstrate that it has performed due diligence through the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS)
NEWS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK AND MARK SILVA and WILLIAM NEIKIRK AND MARK SILVA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 3, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Many of President Bush's supporters have urged him to make a bigger deal about an economic recovery for which polls show he is getting little credit. Yesterday he seized that opportunity with the release of a positive jobs report for November. Bush stepped into the Rose Garden to say an economy kept strong by his policies was responsible for the creation of 215,000 payroll jobs last month, a substantial rise in hiring in view of setbacks from higher oil and gasoline prices and the devastation caused by a series of hurricanes.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | June 16, 2005
ONLY A FEW economic historians are likely to notice that tomorrow marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of the Hawley-Smoot tariff bill, and even economic historians are unlikely to be nostalgic about that disastrous legislation. Why not leave the bad news of the past in the past? After all, we have our own problems today. Unfortunately, the same kind of thinking that led to the Hawley-Smoot tariffs is still alive and well - and in full youthful vigor - in the media and in politics today.
NEWS
By Michael J. Marshall | February 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - The American people are often more sophisticated and able to digest complex issues than many politicians assume, including, it seems, Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry. One of the Democratic front-runner's big applause lines has become his attack on "Benedict Arnold CEOs," whose traitorous activities include their search for lower wages and rising profits and "sticking Americans with the bill," as Mr. Kerry puts it. While this may be considered a crime in some circles, most Americans are not fooled by the rhetoric.
NEWS
May 10, 1996
IN A SPEECH that can be properly described as presidential, Sen. Bob Dole has held to his belief in a policy of normal trading relations with China. His consistency was not without political purpose, for he contrasted it with President Clinton's "complete reversal" on this issue. As a candidate in 1992, he said, Mr. Clinton first described George Bush's policy of extending "most favored nation" trade status to China as "immoral" and then accepted it once he was in office.The presumptive Republican presidential nominee held that Mr. Clinton's "conspicuous silence" on China trade policy had created a situation in which MFN will be a "tough sell" in Congress, where it is opposed by protectionists and human rights activists in both parties.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 1999
PARIS -- Western Europe got its closest thing yet to a supranational government yesterday, as former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi unveiled a 20-member European Commission whose most immediate task will be living down the cronyism and questionable incompetence of its predecessor.The incoming executive for the 15-nation European Union, the world's largest trade bloc, will face daunting tasks. Among them: managing increasingly testy economic relations with the United States, deciding Europe's role in rebuilding Kosovo and expanding the EU eastward into the former Soviet bloc.
NEWS
December 5, 2003
TWO HEADLINES on the business page the other day tell the story: "Officials OK free-trade plan" "Greenspan sounds warning about `creeping protectionism'" When it comes to free trade, the Bush administration's commitment ends where domestic politics begin - making for counterproductive economic and foreign policies. Yesterday, the president wisely lifted tariffs he applied to steel imports last year. The administration cast the tariffs as having boosted the steel industry. But their end was a rare reversal by this White House.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 8, 2003
CHICAGO - Rep. Richard A. Gephardt has a theory of how to become president. It starts with being the most protectionist candidate in the Democratic field, which he hopes will lead to his endorsement by the AFL-CIO, lifting him to victory in the primaries and the general election. But if it were such a great plan, the Missouri congressman wouldn't be running. He'd be writing his presidential memoirs. He tried this approach in 1988, campaigning on a bill to punish countries that ran trade surpluses with the United States.
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