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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2002
STEVENSVILLE -- Just north of U.S. 50, there's a spot where two branches of Cox Creek wind past a point covered with loblolly pines, reeds and holly trees before flowing south together under the highway toward Eastern Bay. Farther east, a flock of Canada geese feeds in a cornfield of brown and black stubble that stretches for at least a mile to old barns, a farmhouse and the broad mouth of the Chester River. A few years from now, the cornfield and the reeds and the forest will be gone, replaced with single-family houses on small lots, and with townhouses, condominiums, offices and shops.
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NEWS
March 12, 2014
In his recent State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley touted his accomplishments in Chesapeake Bay restoration. On closer examination, the record reveals that his claims were misstatements, at best. The truth is that Maryland's portion of the bay remains severely degraded. Oyster, shad and soft clam fisheries have collapsed, bay grasses declined in 2012 to the lowest levels since 1986, and dead zones proliferate. Did the governor intentionally ignore the increasing reports of people with serious flesh-eating skin infections threatening their limbs and lives because they swam or fished in Maryland's waters?
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NEWS
September 8, 1991
Have efforts to help the Chesapeake Bay worked?"Yes and no," Michael Permenter, coordinator of the Soil Conservation Service's Chesapeake Bay Program, said Thursday.Much has been done to stop pollution, but more research and work still is needed, he said.Permenter, who worked at the Carroll County SCS office in 1987 and 1988, spoke at the Agribusiness breakfast at Baugher's Country Restaurant.A cooperative effort between three states and the District of Columbia was begun in 1983 to protect the bay, he said.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
As a concerned mother and environmentalist, I want to thank The Sun for its recent article on pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Report finds widespread contaminants in the bay," Jan. 22). Meaningful efforts to significantly improve the bay must address pesticide runoff. The Pesticide Use Reporting Bill would require certified pesticide and fertilizer applicators to report usage data to a centralized database. Centralizing such information would benefit public agencies in their response to fish kills, dead zones and human health outbreaks.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Five Marylanders were honored last night at the fifth annual Chesapeake Bay Conservation Awards dinner in Annapolis for their efforts to protect the bay.Lina Vlavianos, of Millersville, an outspoken and persistent critic of mud pollution caused by highway building and other construction in Anne Arundel County, was credited with helping to double the number of sediment control inspectors in the state and with getting the State Highway Administration to...
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Ellen Fraites Wagner, who led efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay, died of pulmonary fibrosis Thursday at Memorial Hospital in Easton. She was 45.While serving as then-Maryland Gov. Harry R. Hughes' executive assistant for environmental affairs in the mid-1980s, Mrs. Wagner pushed through legislation that banned phosphates and led to the Chesapeake Bay Trust and the tri-state agreement among Maryland, Delaware and Virginia to protect the bay.In recent years,...
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | July 30, 1993
Hoping that "people will have fun and learn a little," Gov. William Donald Schaefer has turned the month of August into one big party."Party on the Bay," in its fifth year, is a monthlong series of events celebrating the restoration and preservation of the Chesapeake Bay. Each activity is intended to educate the public on how to help preserve the bay, while having fun at the same time.Sponsors like the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Giant Foods, ++ Anheuser-Busch, the Chesapeake Bay Trust and the Governor's Chesapeake Bay Communications Office helped make the 32 events possible.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
The critical question about developing Black Marsh Wildlife Refuge is not so much why it should be done but rather why it shouldn't.The 1,310 acres at the edge of Edgemere in Baltimore County, facing the Chesapeake, was described in the county's master plan as the finest area of tidal wetlands in the upper bay. Though part of the property was once an amusement park, the marsh is now much as it was in the primeval beginning. Bald eagles have been sighted there; the tangled marshland is home to three endangered plant species; various fish and birds inhabit the area.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
The thought of exploring for oil and gas near Chesapeake Bay leaves us uncomfortable. Bay marine life is too fragile to withstand damage caused by an accidental oil spill. That could erase the many gains made to restore the bay to good health and devastate aquatic life.Yet Texaco seeks a relaxation of a two-year moratorium on drilling along Virginia's Chesapeake shores. Texaco hopes to convince Virginia officials that more domestic oil-producing sources are necessary to reduce our dependency on oil produced in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
With encouragement from the state GOP leadership and money to invest in his campaign, first-term state Sen. E.J. Pipkin is considered the likely Republican challenger to incumbent Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. But fellow Republican candidate Corrogan R. Vaughn, a political newcomer from Baltimore County, said he should not be discounted. "We haven't heard what makes Pipkin a great candidate other than he has seven figures," said Vaughn, 37, a businessman who entered the race for the nomination three months before Pipkin and says his campaign has grassroots support.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Tim Wheeler 's recent article sheds new light on the confusing, distasteful, yet critically important problem of fecal pollution from chickens in the Chesapeake and coastal bays ("Maryland farm oversight called weak," Feb 2). The problem appears to arise from a failed though well-meant "model" program instituted by the state. Maryland regulators seem to be engaged in a paper chase, in which they make sure that farmers have submitted plans to control runoff, then file those plans away with little effort to verify whether they are actually being implemented.
NEWS
By Dennis McGinn and Ernest Shea | December 5, 2011
The Senate and House agriculture committees' attempt to integrate a "secret" $250 billion Farm Bill within the supercommittee's package of recommendations collapsed last month with the deficit panel's failure to reach agreement on how to cut federal spending and raise new revenues. As a result, agriculture policymakers are back to square one in crafting a new Farm Bill that will determine much of our nation's food, fiber, conservation and energy policies for the next five years, if not longer.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
I guess our scientists, watermen and politicians are slow learners. Farmers knew eons ago that one doesn't eat the seed corn. Even common sense tells us to protect the females and the future of the species. Bill Huppert, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
It was standing room only Tuesday night at the town hall meeting in Annapolis, and feelings ran high. This forum wasn't about health insurance reform, but about restoring the Chesapeake Bay. People were concerned, worried, even upset. Voices were raised, but no one got shouted down, not even the representative of the Obama administration who spoke - not even when he suggested that more regulations might be needed to bring the bay back to vitality. "We have to look at game-changing solutions," said J. Charles Fox, special adviser to the Environmental Protection Agency administrator for the bay. Fox drew applause.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
WASHINGTON - Calling the Chesapeake Bay a national treasure, lawmakers in Washington expressed dismay yesterday that 2010 cleanup goals for the country's largest estuary would not be met. "We have been paddling backwards," said Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a District of Columbia Democrat. "One can only express profound disappointment that whatever plans we have, have benefited the bay so little." Representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, along with bay advocates, the University of Maryland and others, told a House subcommittee about the slow progress toward goals set by the federal government and bay watershed states, including Maryland.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Fourth-grader Corey Brooks dipped the small white strip of test paper into the glass vial of cloudy water taken from the school parking lot. "Look at all the sediment in the bottom," said one of his lab partners, Brady Meixsell. A few minutes later, the fourth-grader and his peers at Sandymount Elementary School in Finksburg had determined the water's nitrogen and pH levels, and reasoned that its lack of clarity would mean a drop in the production of algae and zooplankton, minute animal life that floats in water.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
It was standing room only Tuesday night at the town hall meeting in Annapolis, and feelings ran high. This forum wasn't about health insurance reform, but about restoring the Chesapeake Bay. People were concerned, worried, even upset. Voices were raised, but no one got shouted down, not even the representative of the Obama administration who spoke - not even when he suggested that more regulations might be needed to bring the bay back to vitality. "We have to look at game-changing solutions," said J. Charles Fox, special adviser to the Environmental Protection Agency administrator for the bay. Fox drew applause.
NEWS
March 17, 2008
In October 2006, the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission did something extraordinary. Its members voted to deny a town the right to reclassify a large tract of waterfront from a protected "resource conservation area" to a designation that allows intensive development. Such a refusal had never happened before - a sad commentary on the commission's relative impotence under existing law. At issue was a $1 billion golf resort near Dorchester County's Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
March 17, 2008
In October 2006, the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission did something extraordinary. Its members voted to deny a town the right to reclassify a large tract of waterfront from a protected "resource conservation area" to a designation that allows intensive development. Such a refusal had never happened before - a sad commentary on the commission's relative impotence under existing law. At issue was a $1 billion golf resort near Dorchester County's Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
With critics saying that waterfront development is chewing away at the Chesapeake Bay's remaining vitality, the O'Malley administration is seeking to tighten long-standing restrictions on shoreline construction, setting the stage for what could be one of the bigger legislative fights in Annapolis this year. The administration plans to introduce a bill today that would beef up the state's 24-year-old Critical Area Law to strengthen development restrictions along the bay and its tributaries.
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