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By KANSAS CITY STAR | November 24, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Early next month, someone at the Missouri Department of Health will pull 132 random numbers from a computer, and all over the state people with AIDS will find out which of them has a chance at a longer, healthier life.Faced with need that outstrips its budget, Missouri will hold the nation's first lottery to decide who gets costly new AIDS drugs called protease inhibitors.Protease inhibitors combined with older drugs such as AZT can reduce the amount of HIV -- the AIDS virus -- in some patients' blood to virtually undetectable levels and prolong their lives.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- AIDS and HIV patients, who have been seeking ever simpler treatments since struggling with a complicated regimen of as many as 25 pills a day a decade ago, can now take one daily pill. The new pill, Atripla, was approved yesterday by the Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated three-month review reflecting the major public health benefits anticipated by activists, doctors and health officials. Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, the acting FDA commissioner, hailed the combination drug as a "landmark" that would "fundamentally change treatment" of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and the virus causing it. Since the difficult early days of treatment, AIDS cocktails have become simple enough that some patients swallow just a few medications a day. Atripla melds three widely prescribed drugs that have been available for several years and are often taken together.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 1998
GENEVA -- Scientists have for the first time found that strains of the AIDS virus resistant to protease inhibitors and other widely used AIDS drugs can be transmitted from one person to another, it was reported yesterday at the 12th World AIDS Conference.Although only two individuals with such multiple-resistant HIV have been identified so far, they have startled many because they are the first involving transmission of strains of HIV resistant to protease inhibitors, which sparked a revolution in treatment two years ago.Scientists did not believe that such highly mutated viruses were capable of passing from person to person.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Researchers have found evidence that the AIDS virus can hide in the immune system for 60 years or more, evading eradication. The finding, by scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, quashes the hope that patients taking today's best medications will be able to stop taking their drugs once the virus burns itself out. For now, there are no signs that the virus ever goes away. "The virus has a mechanism that allows for lifetime persistence," said Dr. Robert Siliciano, a Hopkins AIDS researcher.
NEWS
February 6, 1998
The Los Angeles Times said in an editorial Wednesday:AIDS MORTALITY rates have been declining ever since protease inhibitors became available in 1993. Now, newly released figures paint a bright picture indeed: From 1996 to 1997, AIDS deaths declined by 44 percent in the United States.Continued declines can hardly be assured, however, for while AIDS seems under control in some populations notably the LTC middle-aged gay white males who suffered inordinately in the '80s epidemiologists say it is not declining nearly as rapidly in other groups.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1995
Small preliminary studies that will be reported this week at a national medical meeting show that a new class of drugs is highly effective in knocking out the virus that causes AIDS and allowing the immune system to recover, at least in the short term.But investigators advise caution in interpreting the results, noting that many promising early findings have failed to lead to effective treatments for AIDS patients.The new results are from studies with protease inhibitors, drugs that block a key viral enzyme.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even though new drugs show great promise in combating AIDS, many patients are finding they cannot easily get the costly medicines because of restrictions imposed by health maintenance organizations and by state programs set up to assist people with low incomes.Some HMOs say they limit pharmacy benefits to a specified amount -- $3,000 a year per patient is typical.That is far less than the cost of the drug combinations often recommended by doctors. These regimens, some of which combine new protease inhibitor drugs with older antiviral medications, can easily cost $10,000 to $15,000 a year, and doctors say AIDS patients may need to take the drugs indefinitely.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
AIDS deaths in Maryland dropped a striking 43 percent in 1997 from the previous year - mirroring a national turnaround that appears to confirm the promise of the triple-drug "cocktails" ushered in two years ago.Last year was the second straight year of fewer AIDS deaths in Maryland, but the percentage drop was more than twice as great as it was in 1996. This appears to reflect the broadening impact of the new drugs - as more patients use them and doctors refine the manner in which they are given.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Casting doubt on prospects for an AIDS cure, a leading researcher said yesterday that patients whose viral levels have been pushed to undetectable levels months after starting drug therapy actually harbor a silent infection in "resting cells" of their immune system.Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the existence of a "latent reservoir" of infection suggests that the virus might rebound to dangerous levels if patients ever stopped taking their medications.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
Good news about AIDS can be a scary thing. When good news is heard, people who have tracked the twists in this 15-year-old epidemic swallow hard, then brace for letdown.But 1996 has been a buoyant time on the AIDS front. Suddenly, doctors and advocates are daring to use phrases like "new era." At the heart of their enthusiasm is a series of new drugs -- most of them belonging to a class called "protease inhibitors" -- that appear more powerful than any AIDS medications previously developed.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 8, 1999
DALLAS -- The AIDS virus is quickly developing an ability to outmaneuver the potent drug cocktails that have helped many patients return to their daily routines, evidence from five cities suggests.According to the research, about one in every 100 people who become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus will contract a disease that may defy all types of known medicines. The research represents the first broad tests of the spread of resistant infection in the United States.People who contract these mutant HIV strains may not benefit from dramatic recent gains in AIDS treatment.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 1998
GENEVA -- Scientists have for the first time found that strains of the AIDS virus resistant to protease inhibitors and other widely used AIDS drugs can be transmitted from one person to another, it was reported yesterday at the 12th World AIDS Conference.Although only two individuals with such multiple-resistant HIV have been identified so far, they have startled many because they are the first involving transmission of strains of HIV resistant to protease inhibitors, which sparked a revolution in treatment two years ago.Scientists did not believe that such highly mutated viruses were capable of passing from person to person.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Moveable Feast Inc., the agency delivering meals to low-income people with HIV or AIDS, is getting busier -- and its officials see their growing clientele as a window to the wider community grappling with the disease.They note that people are living longer with the disease, women infected with the virus are turning up in increasing numbers, drug abuse is overwhelmingly the source of the epidemic, and their clients are largely African-American."The AIDS/HIV epidemic has not subsided, although a lot of people think it has," said Moveable Feast's board president, bond analyst Eric Misenheimer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
AIDS deaths in Maryland dropped a striking 43 percent in 1997 from the previous year - mirroring a national turnaround that appears to confirm the promise of the triple-drug "cocktails" ushered in two years ago.Last year was the second straight year of fewer AIDS deaths in Maryland, but the percentage drop was more than twice as great as it was in 1996. This appears to reflect the broadening impact of the new drugs - as more patients use them and doctors refine the manner in which they are given.
NEWS
February 6, 1998
The Los Angeles Times said in an editorial Wednesday:AIDS MORTALITY rates have been declining ever since protease inhibitors became available in 1993. Now, newly released figures paint a bright picture indeed: From 1996 to 1997, AIDS deaths declined by 44 percent in the United States.Continued declines can hardly be assured, however, for while AIDS seems under control in some populations notably the LTC middle-aged gay white males who suffered inordinately in the '80s epidemiologists say it is not declining nearly as rapidly in other groups.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Casting doubt on prospects for an AIDS cure, a leading researcher said yesterday that patients whose viral levels have been pushed to undetectable levels months after starting drug therapy actually harbor a silent infection in "resting cells" of their immune system.Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the existence of a "latent reservoir" of infection suggests that the virus might rebound to dangerous levels if patients ever stopped taking their medications.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the fight against AIDS, this week was a rarity: a moment of encouragement.Researchers attending the Third Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections here heard reports from two drug companies that a new type of drug can significantly prolong the lives of AIDS victims."
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- AIDS and HIV patients, who have been seeking ever simpler treatments since struggling with a complicated regimen of as many as 25 pills a day a decade ago, can now take one daily pill. The new pill, Atripla, was approved yesterday by the Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated three-month review reflecting the major public health benefits anticipated by activists, doctors and health officials. Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, the acting FDA commissioner, hailed the combination drug as a "landmark" that would "fundamentally change treatment" of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and the virus causing it. Since the difficult early days of treatment, AIDS cocktails have become simple enough that some patients swallow just a few medications a day. Atripla melds three widely prescribed drugs that have been available for several years and are often taken together.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even though new drugs show great promise in combating AIDS, many patients are finding they cannot easily get the costly medicines because of restrictions imposed by health maintenance organizations and by state programs set up to assist people with low incomes.Some HMOs say they limit pharmacy benefits to a specified amount -- $3,000 a year per patient is typical.That is far less than the cost of the drug combinations often recommended by doctors. These regimens, some of which combine new protease inhibitor drugs with older antiviral medications, can easily cost $10,000 to $15,000 a year, and doctors say AIDS patients may need to take the drugs indefinitely.
NEWS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | November 24, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Early next month, someone at the Missouri Department of Health will pull 132 random numbers from a computer, and all over the state people with AIDS will find out which of them has a chance at a longer, healthier life.Faced with need that outstrips its budget, Missouri will hold the nation's first lottery to decide who gets costly new AIDS drugs called protease inhibitors.Protease inhibitors combined with older drugs such as AZT can reduce the amount of HIV -- the AIDS virus -- in some patients' blood to virtually undetectable levels and prolong their lives.
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