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By Frank P.L. Somerville | April 30, 1995
"God: A Biography," by Jack Miles. 446 pages. New York: Alfred A. Knopf Inc. $27.50C.S. Lewis' biographers tell us about his conversations, sometimes light, sometimes heavy, always witty, often in cozy pubs, that so delectably fed his voracious imagination.One of these, in 1954, had Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and others engaged in "very good talk" about "who is the most influential and important man in various countries." The group decided on Burke for Ireland, Scott for Scotland, Shakespeare for England - "but there difficulties arose, Pitt and Wellington also being put forward."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
CNN's heavily-promoted prime-time documentary series "Chicagoland" launches tonight at 10. The cable channel desperatedly needs these documentaries to boost ratings. Here's a preview I did for WYPR-FM. Let me know what you think after you see it. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
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NEWS
June 4, 2006
Alibi By Joseph Kanon Picador USA / 416 pages / $14 Post-World War II Venice is the scene of Kanon's novel and a reservoir of secret guilts and intrigue. "For readers accustomed to rooting unconditionally for the protagonist," Dan Fesperman wrote of the novel here last year, "it can be an uneasy experience."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine | December 9, 1997
Viewer advisories aren't exactly unusual on MTV, but the one that aired in the middle of "120 Minutes" early yesterday was without precedent. Warning that the next video contained violence, drug use and full-frontal nudity, MTV News correspondent Kurt Loder urged viewers who might be offended to "turn off your TV."With that, the cable channel aired the Prodigy video "Smack My Bitch Up."The clip, which had drawn protests from the National Organization for Women even before it got its 1 a.m. airing, offers a violent and sordid view of London night-life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2005
The Society of Others by William Nicholson. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. 240 pages. $23.95. The temptation to write a "novel of ideas" has lured many a writer into dangerous territory, especially when such ideas are of the existentialist kind. Because these works probe serious questions, such as the meaning of life or whether there is a higher power governing human behavior, the probability of failure is very high. More practically, novelists who wish to impart great wisdom to their readers often forget to include minor details like a great story, carefully crafted characters, and an engaging plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
The Warlord's Son, by Dan Fesperman, Knopf, 320 pages, $23 When a novel is ripped from the headlines, it can serve two purposessimultaneously: entertain and inform. Dan Fesperman's novel The Warlord'sSon is set in contemporary Pakistan and Afghanistan, where Osama bin Ladenmight be hiding. Better than any news dispatch and in a far more entertaining manner, the novel explains the search for bin Laden, the role of tribal warfare, the influence wielded by multinational corporations and the way journalists operate overseas in unfamiliar territory Fesperman, a Sun reporter, has served as a foreign correspondent, including time in Afghanistan.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 11, 1992
There have been so many social-issue shows lately, with subject matter as wide-ranging as politics, drugs, the environment, terrorism and gender stereotypes, that they threaten to become a little wearing; the gallery-goer may begin to approach them with a certain amount of "cause" fatigue.Surprise: "Woman as Protagonist," just opened at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, is less of a cause show, at least in a sociopolitical sense, than it may sound. One could certainly put together a strong show that advocates a specific agenda, such as pro-choice, equal opportunity, etc., but this is not it.The works here are not primarily calls to action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pauline Mayer and By Pauline Mayer,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
The Seven Sisters, by Margaret Drabble. Harcourt. 320 pages. $25. Starting with her first triumph, A Summer Bird-Cage, Margaret Drabble's quintessential protagonist has been an intellectually and morally enlightened English woman (not unlike Drabble herself) struggling with contemporary issues as well as with her own personal dreams and demons. Not so the divorced and dispossessed heroine of The Seven Sisters, who, when first encountered, is clueless and floundering. Married young, perennially the dutiful and dependent helpmate, and now in her late fifties, Candida Wilton has been dumped by her caddish husband, the headmaster of an exclusive Suffolk boarding school.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
Family Kids Fest 5 at Timonium Fairgrounds tries to be a youngster's dream birthday party with activities ranging from arts and crafts and karaoke to climbing walls and moon bounces. page 29 Scene Mope-meister Neil Hamburger delivers his punchlines with a dose of ennui that's begun to attract a set of fans. page 30 Eats Cafe 921, a cafeteria-style kosher restaurant, operates in the former Pikes movie theater and has a nice variety of food including brick oven-baked pizza and a sushi bar. page 15 Outside It's a mix of skateboarding and music this weekend at Thrash and Jam at M&T Bank Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Poor Undine Barnes-Calles. Not only does this formerly high-flying executive find herself bankrupt, unemployed, homeless and pregnant, she is the creation of a playwright who takes every opportunity to humiliate her. Playwright Lynn Nottage seems so unsympathetic to the title character in Fabulation or, the Re-Education of Undine (running at Center Stage) that a reverse psychology sets in. The audience finds itself rooting for the character to somehow break free of the script and stick it to the author.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | September 16, 2007
Edward Hopper was the greatest American realist painter of the 20th century. Yet to label Hopper a realist also risks misstating the peculiar quality of his genius. The world of Hopper's paintings feels deeply familiar, but it is also deeply strange - preternaturally silent, austere and inward looking, peopled by isolated, disconnected individuals trapped in moods of reverie, anticipation or despair in unprepossessing spaces that only emphasize the emotional distance between them. Hopper's most famous images - lonely city storefronts and apartment buildings, lamp-lit hotel rooms and offices, gingerbread seaside homes and rocky beaches splashed by slanting shafts of sunlight - are the stuff of realistic depiction, but he also made them uncanny, as if they were clues to a riddle that we can never quite unravel.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Specail to the Sun | March 11, 2007
Adam Haberberg Yasmina Reza, translated by Geoffrey Strachan Knopf / 160 pages / $19.95 Tony Award-winning playwright Yasmina Reza expanded her oeuvre into fiction with the publication of her novel, Desolation, in 2003. Desolation wasn't a huge leap for the playwright. She styled her book as a monologue - the ruminations of Samuel Perlman, a crotchety old man with complaints about everyone from his perky wife and ditzy mistress to his spoiled loser of a son with whom he is desperate to connect.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2007
Skylight Confessions Alice Hoffman Little, Brown & Co. / 262 pages / $24.95 Magic and superstition are mainstays in the lives of most of us, even if we are reluctant to admit it. We believe in fate, in luck, in worlds beyond our own, in the power of love to alter our lives. We absent-mindedly toss the spilled salt over our shoulder, avoid the open ladder, step away from the black cat, take care with the number 13. We have talismans we hope will protect us or bring us good fortune. We wish on stars and pluck the petals of daisies and pray for true love to find us and lead us to happiness.
NEWS
June 4, 2006
Alibi By Joseph Kanon Picador USA / 416 pages / $14 Post-World War II Venice is the scene of Kanon's novel and a reservoir of secret guilts and intrigue. "For readers accustomed to rooting unconditionally for the protagonist," Dan Fesperman wrote of the novel here last year, "it can be an uneasy experience."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2005
The Society of Others by William Nicholson. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. 240 pages. $23.95. The temptation to write a "novel of ideas" has lured many a writer into dangerous territory, especially when such ideas are of the existentialist kind. Because these works probe serious questions, such as the meaning of life or whether there is a higher power governing human behavior, the probability of failure is very high. More practically, novelists who wish to impart great wisdom to their readers often forget to include minor details like a great story, carefully crafted characters, and an engaging plot.
NEWS
By Tom Beck | August 19, 1991
HORSE AND CART: STORIES FROM THE COUNTRY. By Elizabeth Stevens. Wineberry Press. 104 pages. $7.95. HAVING grown up in the country, I am immediately leery of stories that purport to be "from the country." However, since the art of fiction is the interpretation and dramatization of experience, I am willing to suspend a certain amount of disbelief and look for the artfulness in Elizabeth Stevens' collection of short stories.Many readers will recognize Stevens not as a writer of fiction, but as an art and architecture critic.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | June 30, 1996
"I KNOW THAT in writing the following pages I am divulging the great secret of my life, the secret which for years I have guarded far more carefully than any of my earthly possessions," declared the narrator of James Weldon Johnson's classic 1912 novel, "The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man."Johnson's fictional hero, who remains anonymous throughout the book, was a light-skinned African-American who managed to escape the crushing social stigma of his race in America by "passing" as a white man. It was, in its time, indeed a terrible secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
The Warlord's Son, by Dan Fesperman, Knopf, 320 pages, $23 When a novel is ripped from the headlines, it can serve two purposessimultaneously: entertain and inform. Dan Fesperman's novel The Warlord'sSon is set in contemporary Pakistan and Afghanistan, where Osama bin Ladenmight be hiding. Better than any news dispatch and in a far more entertaining manner, the novel explains the search for bin Laden, the role of tribal warfare, the influence wielded by multinational corporations and the way journalists operate overseas in unfamiliar territory Fesperman, a Sun reporter, has served as a foreign correspondent, including time in Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
Family Kids Fest 5 at Timonium Fairgrounds tries to be a youngster's dream birthday party with activities ranging from arts and crafts and karaoke to climbing walls and moon bounces. page 29 Scene Mope-meister Neil Hamburger delivers his punchlines with a dose of ennui that's begun to attract a set of fans. page 30 Eats Cafe 921, a cafeteria-style kosher restaurant, operates in the former Pikes movie theater and has a nice variety of food including brick oven-baked pizza and a sushi bar. page 15 Outside It's a mix of skateboarding and music this weekend at Thrash and Jam at M&T Bank Stadium.
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