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NEWS
May 27, 2011
I am writing to speak up for amputees and persons with chronic limb impairment. Several states have taken the extreme steps of trying to modify Medicaid benefits so that the state would deny access to artificial limbs. I am asking you to keep this from happening in Maryland. Recent studies such as the "Prosthetic and Orthotic Adult Benefit" by the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy have concluded that providing this essential health benefit saves money by helping patients avoid costly co-morbid medical conditions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
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NEWS
July 27, 2011
Several states have taken the extreme step of trying to modify Medicaid orthotics and prosthetics benefits in order to deny patients access to artificial limbs. I hope Marylanders will oppose allowing this to happen in our state. Opposing cuts to benefits is an appeal to both fairness and fiscal responsibility. Studies have shown that providing this essential health benefit saves money by helping patients avoid costly co-morbid medical conditions. O&P care permits patients to return to gainful employment and end their dependency on federal and state assistance programs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
One minute, Anne Mekalian's brain is telling her prosthetic arm to unstack a set of multicolored plastic cones, and the shiny black metal limb is listening. Every now and then, the plastic clatters to the table, but quickly the cones are separated and restored to a neat pile. The next moment, though, the bionic hand doesn't know what to make of slight muscle movements in Mekalian's forearm, interpreted through a set of electrodes touching the skin on the rounded remnant limb that extends just below her elbow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
The other day, actress Beth Hylton ended up with a friend glued to her face. The friend came backstage after a performance of "Time Stands Still" at Everyman Theatre and offered Hylton - who plays a wartime photographer injured by a roadside bomb - a congratulatory smooch. The post-show embrace happened so quickly that Hylton couldn't warn her friend that she hadn't yet removed the adhesive used to get the silicone prosthetics to adhere to her skin. "I didn't have time to turn the right side of my face away,' the actress recalls.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A Linthicum firm is among several orthotics and prosthetics companies that will offer victims of the Boston Marathon bombing artificial limbs at no charge if their insurance doesn't cover all or some of the costs of the devices. Dankmeyer Inc., founded by an amputee who lost a leg in a childhood skating accident, joined with other firms Tuesday in announcing the Coalition to Walk and Run Again. The companies have agreed not to charge victims who provide a doctor's note proving they don't have insurance to cover the devices, which cost $8,000 to $60,000.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2006
The Pentagon wants to get one thing straight: It is not building a "bionic" arm like the one test pilot Steve Austin got in The Six Million Dollar Man TV series more than 30 years ago. True, the government is paying the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory $30.4 million to spearhead development of a thought-controlled mechanical arm for the growing number of soldiers who lose their own in battle or accidents. But the new device won't give wearers super powers to carry back into combat.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
Hanger Orthopedic Group Inc. of Bethesda, the country's second-largest provider of braces and artificial limbs, said yesterday that it was buying the country's largest for $455 million in cash and assumed debt.Hanger, which has been growing by small acquisitions, would more than double in size with the acquisition of NovaCare Orthotics & Prosthetics Inc., a subsidiary of NovaCare Inc., a rehabilitation company headquartered in King of Prussia, Pa."It gives us a national program and sets the platform for a global expansion," said Ivan Sabel, chairman and chief executive officer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
You don't often find scientists staging arm-wrestling tournaments - let alone competing in them. But then the match scheduled Monday at the International Society for Optical Engineering conference in San Diego is no ordinary bout. For the first time, researchers plan to pit man-made muscle against living tissue - in this case the sinewy limb of a San Diego high-school senior. The purpose of this unusual test of strength: to spur scientific interest in a little-known but promising class of plastics that expand and contract when jolted by an electrical charge.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
As they prepare to walk across the finish line at the Charlotte marathon, Boston bombing victim Erika Brannock and her family will gather Friday night for a benefit dinner to help offset a mountain of medical bills. Brannock, a 29-year-old Towson preschool teacher, said she's anticipating the gravity of the moment, as she, her mother, Carol Downing, and sister and brother-in-law, Nicole and Michael Gross, cross the finish line as survivors. "My sister is going to be the race starter," said Brannock, who was the honorary starter for the Baltimore Marathon in October.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A Linthicum firm is among several orthotics and prosthetics companies that will offer victims of the Boston Marathon bombing artificial limbs at no charge if their insurance doesn't cover all or some of the costs of the devices. Dankmeyer Inc., founded by an amputee who lost a leg in a childhood skating accident, joined with other firms Tuesday in announcing the Coalition to Walk and Run Again. The companies have agreed not to charge victims who provide a doctor's note proving they don't have insurance to cover the devices, which cost $8,000 to $60,000.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Over the 14 years since losing her right arm to a hollow-point bullet, Dana Burke was convinced she could feel herself pointing, pinching or waving as she motioned with the 5-inch-long limb the attack left behind. Still, she had to relearn how to pull her hair back in a ponytail and tie her shoes. It's a struggle to play horsie with her three children using only one arm for support, and she had to start off with a child's fat crayon to learn to write left-handed. But now, she has proof of what she knew all along.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
The other day, actress Beth Hylton ended up with a friend glued to her face. The friend came backstage after a performance of "Time Stands Still" at Everyman Theatre and offered Hylton - who plays a wartime photographer injured by a roadside bomb - a congratulatory smooch. The post-show embrace happened so quickly that Hylton couldn't warn her friend that she hadn't yet removed the adhesive used to get the silicone prosthetics to adhere to her skin. "I didn't have time to turn the right side of my face away,' the actress recalls.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
She enters the clinic on a walker, slow yet remarkably steady, and as Pauline Wood hails her host for the day, she gives him a bag of lemon tarts she rose early that morning to bake.  With her white hair and glasses, Wood, 89, is every inch the lovable but tough grandmother, complete with her love of puppies, her passion for raising heirloom tomatoes and her predilection for waving away offers of help with the words, "Oh my goodness, I ...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 21, 2011
Terry Reed asks me to remove the cash-filled cardboard coffee cup from the split-hook prosthetic claw that serves as his right hand. "Just put it in my coat pocket, please," he says, as breezes from the brisk traffic along President Street add some wind chill to the dropping temperature. President Street is where Terry Reed does most of his panhandling, and he's hard to miss — a thin man who stands on the solid white line that marks the left-turn lane. He wears a dark blue winter coat and a pair of pants that stop at his knees, revealing chocolate-colored prosthetic limbs below that.
NEWS
By Rex W. Huppke and Rex W. Huppke,Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2005
VALPARAISO, Ind. -- Richard Marrell II spends his days amid the dust of Brazilian hardwood, seconds ticking off to the chucka-chucka-chuck rhythm of a busy drill press. He's in a weathered cinderblock building that once housed a muffler shop, making wooden bones that will be sewn into the arms and legs of dead bodies across the country. Wood bones for dead bodies? Well, technically they're called "cadaveric donor prosthetics." They're replacement parts for people who have died and donated their bones and tissue -- femurs, joints, ligaments, tendons -- to living human beings.
NEWS
By [Andrew A. Green] | December 17, 2006
Larry Kimble Occupation Maryland Transit Administration's executive director of corporate services In the news He helped Maryland launch a first-of-its kind program to allow veterans to take training classes that the state government offers its employees, a service that officials say will help reduce high unemployment rates for those leaving the service. Career highlights He served in the Marines from 1973 to 1979 and went on to a career with the Defense Department and Veterans Administration, eventually becoming the chief of prosthetics for the Maryland Veterans Administration health system.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
Several states have taken the extreme step of trying to modify Medicaid orthotics and prosthetics benefits in order to deny patients access to artificial limbs. I hope Marylanders will oppose allowing this to happen in our state. Opposing cuts to benefits is an appeal to both fairness and fiscal responsibility. Studies have shown that providing this essential health benefit saves money by helping patients avoid costly co-morbid medical conditions. O&P care permits patients to return to gainful employment and end their dependency on federal and state assistance programs.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
I am writing to speak up for amputees and persons with chronic limb impairment. Several states have taken the extreme steps of trying to modify Medicaid benefits so that the state would deny access to artificial limbs. I am asking you to keep this from happening in Maryland. Recent studies such as the "Prosthetic and Orthotic Adult Benefit" by the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy have concluded that providing this essential health benefit saves money by helping patients avoid costly co-morbid medical conditions.
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