Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProstate Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Prostate Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Milton Kent, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
At least 15 percent of American men have vasectomies, so when a study came out recently linking this common method of birth control to an increased risk of the most lethal kind of prostate cancer, it sparked some alarm in doctors' offices. The findings "caused a lot of fear among many people, people who had had vasectomies," said Dr. Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, one of the study's authors and director of urologic robotic surgery and an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
HEALTH
September 11, 2014
A selection of events, resources and medical institutions. Events Free prostate screening 4-6 p.m. Thursday at the Good Health Center at MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, 5601 Loch Raven Blvd., Baltimore. Registration is required. To make an appointment, call 443-444-4100. ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk 10K run, 5K run/walk, 1 mile fun walk, Kids Superhero Dash for Dad and virtual Snooze for Dudes program. Funds raised are split between local community and national efforts to fund research, testing, and education for men and their families.
HEALTH
By Judy Berman | September 16, 2013
October, with its ubiquitous pink ribbons, has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness. I'm guessing you didn't know that September has a ribbon too - a little-seen light blue ribbon that is the sign of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. I didn't know it. But last September I became acutely aware of prostate cancer, when my husband was diagnosed with the disease. I set up a full physical exam for my less-than-thrilled husband earlier in 2012, when a friend was diagnosed with prostate cancer.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
For years, the PSA test has been the standard method for early detection of prostate cancer, which strikes one in six men. But recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a federal advisory panel, said the test that checks for prostate-specific antigens should not be routinely given to healthy men because it doesn't save enough lives to warrant all the extra treatment and stress stemming from the tests. Some men die of complications from surgery to remove the prostate, and many others suffer side effects.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 11, 2012
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Michigan have discovered an inherited mutation linked to significantly higher risk of prostate cancer development at a younger age. The discovery, after two decades of looking, provides insight into the disease development. And though those with the mutation comprise just a fraction of the 240,000 new cases diagnosed annually, the discovery could also help doctors determine who needs earlier screening. The discovery is the first major genetic variant found for inherited prostate cancer, said Dr. Kathleen A. Cooney, professor of internal medicine and urology at the Michigan Medical School and a senior author of the study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine . The study found that those with a family history of prostate cancer were much more likely to have the mutation, and that gave them a 10-20 higher risk of developing the disease themselves.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
Doctors are offering free screenings for prostate cancer from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Friday in a mobile lab outside the Safeway at 2401 N. Charles St. The "Do it for Dad" drive against prostate cancer is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the National Prostate Cancer Coalition and the Family Health Center of Baltimore. Doctors will conduct the two-part testing inside a 39-foot-long Airstream Land Yacht XL. It will include a blood test and a physical exam. Maryland ranks 10th in the nation in incidence of prostate cancer and in mortality.
NEWS
April 28, 1992
A number of men in public life are talking publicly these days about their prostate cancer -- a disease that until recently few men wanted to discuss, and many agree the time for public airing is overdue.Details on Page 1C
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Because of advanced treatments, curing prostate cancer has become more common. There now are more than 2.5 million survivors in the United States. Still, many men suffer from side effects after treatment, which may be a deterrent to obtaining care or even discussing the matter with a doctor. But early diagnosis and appropriate treatment will provide the best outcomes, according to Dr. Ira E. Hantman, a urologist with Urology Specialists of Maryland at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Milton Kent, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
At least 15 percent of American men have vasectomies, so when a study came out recently linking this common method of birth control to an increased risk of the most lethal kind of prostate cancer, it sparked some alarm in doctors' offices. The findings "caused a lot of fear among many people, people who had had vasectomies," said Dr. Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, one of the study's authors and director of urologic robotic surgery and an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
The first thing they do to new male students at the Naval Academy is shave their heads. So it is a bit of a shock to see the guys sporting ... mustaches. But the button-downed Brigade of Midshipmen has received permission from the top of the chain of command to grow whatever lip fuzz they can muster during November - which for the last decade has been known as "Movember," an effort to raise awareness and research funds for men's health. It is Midshipman Mustache Month at an institution that forbids facial hair on students, but for the first time in its history is allowing it because of the persistence of a Mid who spent months petitioning his superiors.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Thanks to Judy Berman for her wonderful support of her husband, and advice to Howard County men and women, in "My personal prostate cancer month. " I am personally very close in experience to her husband. All I can conclude is that without the PSA test I would have gone on in peaceful ignorance only to die painfully at a relatively early age from prostate cancer. Mrs. Berman, bless her heart, however only tangentially addresses the problem brought on by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
HEALTH
By Judy Berman | September 16, 2013
October, with its ubiquitous pink ribbons, has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness. I'm guessing you didn't know that September has a ribbon too - a little-seen light blue ribbon that is the sign of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. I didn't know it. But last September I became acutely aware of prostate cancer, when my husband was diagnosed with the disease. I set up a full physical exam for my less-than-thrilled husband earlier in 2012, when a friend was diagnosed with prostate cancer.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.