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Prostate Cancer

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HEALTH
By Judy Berman | September 16, 2013
October, with its ubiquitous pink ribbons, has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness. I'm guessing you didn't know that September has a ribbon too - a little-seen light blue ribbon that is the sign of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. I didn't know it. But last September I became acutely aware of prostate cancer, when my husband was diagnosed with the disease. I set up a full physical exam for my less-than-thrilled husband earlier in 2012, when a friend was diagnosed with prostate cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
The first thing they do to new male students at the Naval Academy is shave their heads. So it is a bit of a shock to see the guys sporting ... mustaches. But the button-downed Brigade of Midshipmen has received permission from the top of the chain of command to grow whatever lip fuzz they can muster during November - which for the last decade has been known as "Movember," an effort to raise awareness and research funds for men's health. It is Midshipman Mustache Month at an institution that forbids facial hair on students, but for the first time in its history is allowing it because of the persistence of a Mid who spent months petitioning his superiors.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Thanks to Judy Berman for her wonderful support of her husband, and advice to Howard County men and women, in "My personal prostate cancer month. " I am personally very close in experience to her husband. All I can conclude is that without the PSA test I would have gone on in peaceful ignorance only to die painfully at a relatively early age from prostate cancer. Mrs. Berman, bless her heart, however only tangentially addresses the problem brought on by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
For years, the PSA test has been the standard method for early detection of prostate cancer, which strikes one in six men. But recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a federal advisory panel, said the test that checks for prostate-specific antigens should not be routinely given to healthy men because it doesn't save enough lives to warrant all the extra treatment and stress stemming from the tests. Some men die of complications from surgery to remove the prostate, and many others suffer side effects.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 11, 2012
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Michigan have discovered an inherited mutation linked to significantly higher risk of prostate cancer development at a younger age. The discovery, after two decades of looking, provides insight into the disease development. And though those with the mutation comprise just a fraction of the 240,000 new cases diagnosed annually, the discovery could also help doctors determine who needs earlier screening. The discovery is the first major genetic variant found for inherited prostate cancer, said Dr. Kathleen A. Cooney, professor of internal medicine and urology at the Michigan Medical School and a senior author of the study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine . The study found that those with a family history of prostate cancer were much more likely to have the mutation, and that gave them a 10-20 higher risk of developing the disease themselves.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
Doctors are offering free screenings for prostate cancer from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Friday in a mobile lab outside the Safeway at 2401 N. Charles St. The "Do it for Dad" drive against prostate cancer is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the National Prostate Cancer Coalition and the Family Health Center of Baltimore. Doctors will conduct the two-part testing inside a 39-foot-long Airstream Land Yacht XL. It will include a blood test and a physical exam. Maryland ranks 10th in the nation in incidence of prostate cancer and in mortality.
NEWS
April 28, 1992
A number of men in public life are talking publicly these days about their prostate cancer -- a disease that until recently few men wanted to discuss, and many agree the time for public airing is overdue.Details on Page 1C
NEWS
By MARLA CONE and MARLA CONE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2006
Linking prostate cancer to a widespread industrial compound, scientists have found that exposure to a chemical that leaks from plastic causes genetic changes in animals' developing prostate glands that are precursors of the most common form of cancer in males. The chemical, bisphenol A or BPA, is used in the manufacture of the hard, polycarbonate plastic of baby bottles, microwave cookware and other consumer goods and has been detected in nearly every human body tested. Scientists and health experts have theorized for more than a decade that chemicals in the environment and consumer products mimic estrogens and may be contributing to male and female reproductive diseases, particularly prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1993
Older men with early-stage prostate cancer may be better off waiting and having regular checkups and tests to monitor their cancer than having surgery or radiation therapy, says a new report.The study in yesterday's Journal of the American Medical Association is likely to stir controversy among doctors and the public about the effectiveness of surgery and radiation to treat prostate cancer, the most common kind of cancer among American men.Surgery and radiation for men older than 60 with early stages of prostate cancer may not help them live longer and may put them at risk for complications, particularly impotence and incontinence, which may "severely degrade quality of life," the study said.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
HEALTH
By Judy Berman | September 16, 2013
October, with its ubiquitous pink ribbons, has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness. I'm guessing you didn't know that September has a ribbon too - a little-seen light blue ribbon that is the sign of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. I didn't know it. But last September I became acutely aware of prostate cancer, when my husband was diagnosed with the disease. I set up a full physical exam for my less-than-thrilled husband earlier in 2012, when a friend was diagnosed with prostate cancer.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Robert Lee Lyles Jr., who had two careers in his 69 years and excelled at each, died May 27 at his home in Annapolis. A scientist, physician and state policy adviser, Dr. Lyles "was a modern renaissance man with a tremendous curiosity," said Gene Ransom, CEO of MedChi, the Maryland State Medical Society. In April, Dr. Lyles was honored by the Maryland Society of Anesthesiologists by having a scholarship created in his name, "established to support the efforts of MSA members to promote the specialty of anesthesiology and preserve the appropriateness and safety of the delivery of anesthesia in Maryland.
HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News and By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | June 1, 2013
For nearly a quarter-century, doctors have ordered annual PSA tests for men of a certain age to screen for prostate cancer, despite a lack of evidence that its benefits outweigh the risks - especially when tiny, slow-growing tumors were detected. But the landscape appears to be changing. While questions about PSA screening remain, physicians increasingly recognize the need to discuss both its harms and benefits with patients. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force shook up the status quo last July when it advised against using the simple blood test, which measures levels of a protein called prostate specific antigen, with average-risk men of any age who had no prostate cancer symptoms.
NEWS
nabosley411@aol.com | April 9, 2013
Spring is the time of rebirth and renewal . For some, that means tee time and a chance to be outdoors, unwinding from the stresses of everyday life. If golf is your sport of choice, then you need to check out the Zero Prostate Cancer Golf Classic. This event takes place on May 13 from 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. at the Towson Golf and Country Club, where LPGA tour players will join other golfers to help fight against prostate cancer. Founded by Chesapeake Urology Associates as the Great Prostate Cancer Challenge Baltimore Classic, this event raises funds to further research and provide free screenings in dozens of cities across the U.S. A Driving Range Clinic with the LPGA pros, plus a brunch, is from 10:30 a.m. until noon when a shotgun start begins the 18-hole adventure.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 28, 2008
About 218,000 men were diagnosed last year with prostate cancer, and about 27,000 men died from the disease, according to the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Although doctors continue to debate the best approach to detecting early-stage prostate cancer, men age 50 and older (or younger for those who are at risk) should be screened annually for prostate cancer, says Dr. Ira Hantman of the Urology Center at Mercy Medical Center. Who should be screened for prostate cancer? The general guidelines still are that men 50 and older should have both a PSA screening (blood test)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
After Jon Spelman got the bad news, he found himself thinking often and at odd moments about "Moby-Dick. " Perhaps that's because the behemoth that was attacking the Baltimore storyteller was as submerged, unreasoning and unpredictable as any great white whale, and every bit as ferocious. Spelman knew that like Captain Ahab, the anti-hero of Herman Melville's novel, he would have to hunt his hunter. He armed himself not just with doctors and surgery and cancer-fighting drugs, but with wit, bravery and a determination to look straight at his own death - whenever it might come.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Otis R. "Damon" Harris Jr., a Baltimore singer who performed with the Temptations during the 1970s and later used his own diagnosis of prostate cancer to help raise awareness of the disease in African-American men, died Feb. 18 from the disease at Joseph Richey Hospice. The Owings Mills resident was 62. "Singing was his thing. When we were kids, his ambition was to be a singer for the Temptations. We did talent shows where we played Temps records and he'd sing," said Chuck Woodson, a cousin and broadcaster who recently retired as general manager of WFBR-AM 1590.
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