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NEWS
October 1, 2013
Thanks to Judy Berman for her wonderful support of her husband, and advice to Howard County men and women, in "My personal prostate cancer month. " I am personally very close in experience to her husband. All I can conclude is that without the PSA test I would have gone on in peaceful ignorance only to die painfully at a relatively early age from prostate cancer. Mrs. Berman, bless her heart, however only tangentially addresses the problem brought on by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,King Features Syndicate | December 2, 1997
We would like your opinion of saw palmetto berries. My husband was on this herb for several months. He felt great and even stopped having to get up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom.When he went to the urologist, he was told to stop taking the herb even though the doctor did reluctantly say that the prostate had shrunk a bit. Since stopping the saw palmetto, my husband hasn't felt as well and is again getting up in the middle of the night to void. He has trouble going back to sleep.
HEALTH
September 11, 2014
A selection of events, resources and medical institutions. Events Free prostate screening 4-6 p.m. Thursday at the Good Health Center at MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, 5601 Loch Raven Blvd., Baltimore. Registration is required. To make an appointment, call 443-444-4100. ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk 10K run, 5K run/walk, 1 mile fun walk, Kids Superhero Dash for Dad and virtual Snooze for Dudes program. Funds raised are split between local community and national efforts to fund research, testing, and education for men and their families.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 30, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Ehud Olmert announced yesterday that he has prostate cancer but that he will continue to govern and expects to be cured by surgery. Olmert, 62, looking fit and speaking calmly, told a news conference that a biopsy had detected a malignant tumor in its early stage. He said he had learned of the diagnosis over the weekend and has chosen to undergo surgical removal of the prostate gland "in the coming months." "My doctors have informed me that I have a full chance of recovery and there is nothing about the tumor that is life-threatening or liable to impair my performance or my ability to carry out the duties bestowed upon me," he said.
NEWS
By Robyn Shelton and Robyn Shelton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 29, 2004
The vitamin E in an extra handful of nuts or serving of spinach each day may help cut the risk of bladder and prostate cancers, according to two separate studies presented yesterday in Orlando. For the prostate, Finnish men who got more of the vitamin in their diets slashed their risk by as much as 53 percent. For the bladder, people in a Texas-based study had about a 40 percent reduction in risk whether they took vitamin E supplements or ate more foods that are rich in the nutrient. Though the results are intriguing, scientists said additional research is needed to see if the vitamin truly protects against cancer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2000
Columbia-based Celsion Corp. said yesterday that it had gotten government approval to begin testing on patients the safety and effectiveness of a 45-minute outpatient procedure designed to rapidly relieve symptoms of a benign prostate disease. Johns Hopkins University Medical Center in Baltimore will be among the six sites at which Celsion will test its patented treatment system on 160 men. The company has successfully completed Phase I safety trials of the system, designed to relieve the constricted urethra that makes urinating difficult for men with enlarged prostates.
NEWS
January 8, 2010
Philip Ben Wah, Sr A funeral service will be held at Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road on Saturday at 1 P.M. Friends may call on Saturday 11 A.M till 1 P.M. Family suggest contributions may be made to The Johns Hopkins Prostate Cancer Research Fund/ M. Eisenberger, M.D. Bunting Blaustein Cancer Research Building, 1650 Orleans Street, Room 1M52, Baltimore, Md. 21231.
EXPLORE
Aegis report | March 25, 2013
Chesapeake Urology Associates, P.A., one of the nation's largest urology groups, has announced Dr. Sankar Kausik, M.D., F.A.C.S., has been named Chief of Urology for the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, part of Upper Chesapeake Health, an affiliate partner with the University of Maryland Medical System. Kausik has practiced at the Bel Air facility for more than 10 years. Kausik is the 11th Chesapeake Urology physician to serve as Chief of Urology at a major Baltimore area hospital.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Ted and Colleen Garringer had always dreamed of cycling cross-country when they retired. So two weeks before Ted was to leave his job, he visited his doctor to get clearance for the trip. A blood test would soon turn up shocking results: The fit, 55-year-old cyclist was suffering from a form of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a cancer that kills 23,000 people a year. "We were called into the doctor's office on the day Ted retired," Colleen says. But rather than hunkering down in a hospital, the Garringers followed medical advice from cancer specialists and proceeded with their eight-month, 5,000-mile bike trip.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Because of advanced treatments, curing prostate cancer has become more common. There now are more than 2.5 million survivors in the United States. Still, many men suffer from side effects after treatment, which may be a deterrent to obtaining care or even discussing the matter with a doctor. But early diagnosis and appropriate treatment will provide the best outcomes, according to Dr. Ira E. Hantman, a urologist with Urology Specialists of Maryland at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Milton Kent, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
At least 15 percent of American men have vasectomies, so when a study came out recently linking this common method of birth control to an increased risk of the most lethal kind of prostate cancer, it sparked some alarm in doctors' offices. The findings "caused a lot of fear among many people, people who had had vasectomies," said Dr. Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, one of the study's authors and director of urologic robotic surgery and an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Thanks to Judy Berman for her wonderful support of her husband, and advice to Howard County men and women, in "My personal prostate cancer month. " I am personally very close in experience to her husband. All I can conclude is that without the PSA test I would have gone on in peaceful ignorance only to die painfully at a relatively early age from prostate cancer. Mrs. Berman, bless her heart, however only tangentially addresses the problem brought on by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
HEALTH
By Judy Berman | September 16, 2013
October, with its ubiquitous pink ribbons, has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness. I'm guessing you didn't know that September has a ribbon too - a little-seen light blue ribbon that is the sign of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. I didn't know it. But last September I became acutely aware of prostate cancer, when my husband was diagnosed with the disease. I set up a full physical exam for my less-than-thrilled husband earlier in 2012, when a friend was diagnosed with prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | September 29, 2006
I've heard that ibuprofen will negate the positive effects of aspirin if the two are taken together. I read a report that says ibuprofen blocks aspirin's effect for only two hours and that it's safe to take ibuprofen two hours after aspirin to circumvent this effect. Any truth to this? Several years ago, a report in the New England Journal of Medicine (Dec. 20, 2001) suggested that ibuprofen could counteract the anti-clotting benefits of aspirin. A new study in the journal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (September)
HEALTH
December 14, 2009
•"Man-to-Man," a monthly education and support group for men and their significant others to learn about topics related to prostate cancer diagnosis and management, will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. today in the Tate Center Conference Room of Baltimore Washington Medical Center, 301 Hospital Drive, Glen Burnie. Free. For more information, call 410-553-8103 or 410-421-4304. •Learn about how to sleep better at a "Peaceful Sleeping" seminar at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Harbor Hospital's Baum Auditorium, 3001 S. Hanover St. A light dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. Registration required; call 410-350-2563 or visit harborhospital.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 29, 2013
September marks Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and with prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, the Harford County Health Department urges men to consider the facts about prostate cancer and the importance of a healthy prostate. In 2013, The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,880 men in Maryland will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 560 will die from it this year, while across the country, approximately 238,590 men will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from this cancer this year.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Many men will experience prostate enlargement as they get older, some to the point that it will cause urination problems. Dr. Michael Naslund, director of the Maryland Prostate Center at the University Maryland Medical Center, said there are many options for treatment, including surgery, drugs and lifestyle changes. What is the prostate and how does it function in the body? The prostate gland sits beneath the bladder in men. The primary function of the prostate in a young man is to produce some of the fluid in the ejaculate and to transport urine and sperm out of the body through the urethra.
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