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NEWS
June 14, 2003
On June 11, 2003 PROSPERO A. MAGAT beloved husband of Prose G. Magat; loving father of Karlo G. and his wife Anna L. Magat; devoted grandfather of Isabella F. Magat and admired brother of Rosario M. and her husband Julian Agardi. Visitation to be held at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated on Saturday at 10 a.m. in St. Jude Shrine, 308 N. Paca Street with reception to follow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2007
WILLIAM HUTT, 87 Canadian actor William Hutt, widely regarded as one of Canada's finest classical actors and a company member at the Stratford Festival for almost four decades, died Wednesday of leukemia at Stratford General Hospital, the Festival announced. At the Stratford Festival, where he was a founding member, Mr. Hutt was involved in 130 productions as either an actor or director. Among his more memorable performances were the title characters in King Lear, Volpone, Tartuffe, Richard II and Titus Andronicus, as well as such diverse roles as Prospero in The Tempest, James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night and Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2005
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre usually slots the Bard for July, the central month of its calendar. This season brings Shakespeare's The Tempest - a comedy that offers dances and songs and some mystical characters that the audience can see but are invisible to other actors on stage. A great storm - the tempest of the title - forces Alonso, the King of Naples, and his traveling party to abandon their ship. With Alonso are his brother, Sebastian; his son, Ferdinand; and Antonio, brother of the rightful Duke of Milan, Prospero.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2005
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre usually slots the Bard for July, the central month of its calendar. This season brings Shakespeare's The Tempest - a comedy that offers dances and songs and some mystical characters that the audience can see but are invisible to other actors on stage. A great storm - the tempest of the title - forces Alonso, the King of Naples, and his traveling party to abandon their ship. With Alonso are his brother, Sebastian; his son, Ferdinand; and Antonio, brother of the rightful Duke of Milan, Prospero.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 19, 1997
The most magnificent scene in the Shakespeare Theatre's production of "The Tempest" is the masque that Prospero conjures up to celebrate his daughter's betrothal.Part puppet show, part live-action, it glows with the colorful, jewel-like brilliance of stained glass. And, like stained glass, it is artificial, which is precisely the point.Living in exile on a desert island, Prospero has honed his mind and his magic, but he has also become increasingly distanced -- mentally as well as physically -- from the rest of humanity.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1992
An admirable version of Shakespeare's last play, "The Tempest," is the final summer presentation of The New Century Theater, a young professional theater in residence in the Mildred Dunnock Theatre at Goucher College.Running through Aug. 2, this fantastical story about the clash of aesthetic and evil forces manipulated by a great enchanter on a remote magical island has been commendably directed by Richard Pilcher. Good ensemble acting, some brilliantly conceived individual performances and excellent special effects mark this uniquely staged production.
NEWS
June 29, 2007
WILLIAM HUTT, 87 Canadian actor William Hutt, widely regarded as one of Canada's finest classical actors and a company member at the Stratford Festival for almost four decades, died Wednesday of leukemia at Stratford General Hospital, the Festival announced. At the Stratford Festival, where he was a founding member, Mr. Hutt was involved in 130 productions as either an actor or director. Among his more memorable performances were the title characters in King Lear, Volpone, Tartuffe, Richard II and Titus Andronicus, as well as such diverse roles as Prospero in The Tempest, James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night and Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Soft rock, ballads and soulful blues are the musical framework for a thoroughly enchanting version of William Shakespeare's last play, "The Tempest," being staged by the University of Maryland Baltimore County's traveling troupe, Shakespeare on Wheels.The romantic comedy/drama filled with the metaphoric wine of aged wisdom is considered by many to be the Bard's symbolic autobiography that explores human nature in lovely, lyrical poetry.Sam McCready's excellent direction distinguishes this outstanding presentation.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | July 4, 1991
Theater director Sam McCready has never been one to play by the book in his productions at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, so imagine what he does when the book in question is Prospero's volume of necromancy in "The Tempest."Whatever you're imagining at this moment, though, probably falls short of what Mr. McCready has done for better -- and mostly for worse -- with his rock musical version, "The Tempest: A Rock Odyssey," in which the Elizabethan age meets the space age. There certainly are no lutes to be heard here, what with keyboard wails and thumping drumming to rival any tempest.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 22, 2004
For all of the wizard Prospero's sweeping, sky-colored robe, his magic wand and book of spells, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival production of The Tempest is fatally short on sorcery - especially the garden-variety sort that can keep an audience spellbound through five acts. Instead, audience members may feel as though they are visiting the Land of Tiny Emotions. Everything is remote, encapsulated, cut off. Instead of a gale of epic proportions, director Laura Hackman gives us a drizzle.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 22, 2004
For all of the wizard Prospero's sweeping, sky-colored robe, his magic wand and book of spells, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival production of The Tempest is fatally short on sorcery - especially the garden-variety sort that can keep an audience spellbound through five acts. Instead, audience members may feel as though they are visiting the Land of Tiny Emotions. Everything is remote, encapsulated, cut off. Instead of a gale of epic proportions, director Laura Hackman gives us a drizzle.
NEWS
June 14, 2003
On June 11, 2003 PROSPERO A. MAGAT beloved husband of Prose G. Magat; loving father of Karlo G. and his wife Anna L. Magat; devoted grandfather of Isabella F. Magat and admired brother of Rosario M. and her husband Julian Agardi. Visitation to be held at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated on Saturday at 10 a.m. in St. Jude Shrine, 308 N. Paca Street with reception to follow.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 19, 1997
The most magnificent scene in the Shakespeare Theatre's production of "The Tempest" is the masque that Prospero conjures up to celebrate his daughter's betrothal.Part puppet show, part live-action, it glows with the colorful, jewel-like brilliance of stained glass. And, like stained glass, it is artificial, which is precisely the point.Living in exile on a desert island, Prospero has honed his mind and his magic, but he has also become increasingly distanced -- mentally as well as physically -- from the rest of humanity.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1992
An admirable version of Shakespeare's last play, "The Tempest," is the final summer presentation of The New Century Theater, a young professional theater in residence in the Mildred Dunnock Theatre at Goucher College.Running through Aug. 2, this fantastical story about the clash of aesthetic and evil forces manipulated by a great enchanter on a remote magical island has been commendably directed by Richard Pilcher. Good ensemble acting, some brilliantly conceived individual performances and excellent special effects mark this uniquely staged production.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 29, 1991
Peter Greenaway's "Prospero's Books," now at the Rotunda, straddles the thin line between the highbrow and the really highbrow.It is not, to dispel one rumor, in any way a production of Shakespeare's "Tempest," at least not in any normal usage of that word. It is rather a visualization, a distillation, a conceptualization of the Bard's work. As the 1956 sci-fi classic "Forbidden Planet" opened the play for access by the masses, "Prospero's Books" closes access down to exclude the masses: It's a forbidden planet for no one but the most recondite of tastes.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
YOU WATCH ''Prospero's Books'' wondering where in the world director Peter Greenaway (he did the script and directed) got the money to do it. It had to cost a small bundle. It is, without a doubt, one of the most demanding, least commercial films you will ever see.Yes, there is nudity. There is probably more nudity in this one film then there was in all the films that played the Rex when it was a skin house.The nudity, however, becomes boring, like the rest of the film.''Prospero's Books'' is Greenaway's version of Shakespeare's ''The Tempest.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
YOU WATCH ''Prospero's Books'' wondering where in the world director Peter Greenaway (he did the script and directed) got the money to do it. It had to cost a small bundle. It is, without a doubt, one of the most demanding, least commercial films you will ever see.Yes, there is nudity. There is probably more nudity in this one film then there was in all the films that played the Rex when it was a skin house.The nudity, however, becomes boring, like the rest of the film.''Prospero's Books'' is Greenaway's version of Shakespeare's ''The Tempest.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Soft rock, ballads and soulful blues are the musical framework for a thoroughly enchanting version of William Shakespeare's last play, "The Tempest," being staged by the University of Maryland Baltimore County's traveling troupe, Shakespeare on Wheels.The romantic comedy/drama filled with the metaphoric wine of aged wisdom is considered by many to be the Bard's symbolic autobiography that explores human nature in lovely, lyrical poetry.Sam McCready's excellent direction distinguishes this outstanding presentation.
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