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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
A jury in the trial of three men accused of killing former Baltimore City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris could be seated by Friday. If it is — and there is no guarantee, given how long the selection has taken — opening statements would begin Monday. The trial could last a month or more, the judge told a room full of prospective jurors Thursday morning. When he asked them whether such a long trial would be a hardship, dozens of hands shot into the air. The choice of a jury — a panel of 12, plus two alternates — began Sept.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has waived his right to a jury in his criminal misconduct trial, clearing the way for attorneys to make opening statements Friday in a case that now will be heard by a single judge. The surprise move came during the second day of jury selection in the trial of Leopold, who faces charges of fraud and misconduct for allegedly using his taxpayer-funded police detail to run personal and political errands. Neither Leopold nor his attorneys explained the reason for the change of course or its timing.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 29, 1992
MILWAUKEE -- With quiet rage and sorrow, they come each day to sit in the courtroom where Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer's mind is on trial. Most are black. They are the victims' families."
NEWS
By Tony Newman | December 27, 2011
Should juries vote "not guilty" on low-level marijuana charges to send a message about our country's insane marijuana arrest policy? Jury nullification is a constitutional doctrine that allows juries to acquit defendants who are technically guilty but who don't deserve punishment. As Paul Butler wrote recently in The New York Times, juries have the right and power to use jury nullification to protest unjust laws. Mr. Butler points out that nullification was credited with ending our country's disastrous alcohol Prohibition as more and more jurors refused to send their neighbors to jail for a law they didn't believe in. He says we need to do the same with today's marijuana arrests.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr. rejected a defense argument yesterday that jury selection in the Sizzler Restaurant murder case was discriminatory because a prosecutor challenged several black prospective jurors.The final 12-member panel chosen to hear the case against Robert Lee Berry, 26, has three black women jurors; another black woman is among the three alternates.Mr. Berry is on trial in Baltimore County Circuit Court charged with killing John D. Tillman, 29, during a Dec. 26 robbery at the Sizzler Restaurant, in the 10000 block of York Road, Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
After two days of delays, Richard Antonio Moore was given his first look yesterday at the people who might decide his fate. Jury selection began in Harford County Circuit Court for Moore, 30, of Baltimore, who is charged with fatally shooting Baltimore County police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero last year. Prothero, 35, a father of five, was shot three times Feb. 7 as he chased four men after a robbery at J. Brown Jewelers in Pikesville, where he was working part-time as a security guard. Three other defendants have been convicted of first-degree felony murder in the shooting, but Moore is the only one to face the possibility of the death penalty.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
Baltimore Circuit Judge Marshall A. Levin has reversed his order barring reporters from the questioning of potential jurors in the asbestos trial.Mary R. Craig, a lawyer for The Evening Sun, argued that the public cannot be barred from the questioning process, known as voir dire, unless a juror specifically requests that questions be asked in the judge's chambers.The court, Craig said, then must determine whether the juror's privacy is outweighed by the public right of access to the proceeding.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
In a decision aimed at ensuring fair trials for minorities, the Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that a judge must ask prospective jurors about their racial bias if a minority defendant requests such a question during jury selection.The ruling by Judge Robert M. Bell reverses the jury conviction of a Baltimore man on drug charges and extends a requirement that judges ask prospective jurors if their backgrounds prevent them from rendering a fair verdict.Maryland's highest court ruled in 1985 that judges must question jurors specifically about racial bias, but said they only need ask in cases where the defendant was a minority being tried for a violent crime and the victim was of a different race.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | June 6, 1991
Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Marshall A. Levin says it was pTC with "profound reluctance" that he dismissed all 51 prospective jurors in the nation's largest-ever consolidated trial.The giant trial of 9,032 asbestos cases was derailed May 22 when a defense law firm faxed psychological profiles of prospective jurors to the opposition.Calling the incident "bizarre," Levin decided yesterday to strike the potential jurors and start over again."I do that [strike the jurors] with profound reluctance," he said.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | September 13, 1990
Dozens of prospective jurors were dismissed from service in Baltimore yesterday after a defense lawyer in a scheduled capital murder trial complained about remarks made to them during an orientation session by Circuit Court Judge Thomas Ward.A law clerk sent to observe the session by defense lawyer M. Christina Gutierrez quoted Judge Ward, in an affidavit, as saying, "In criminal cases it is the job of the prosecution to convict. It is the job of the defense to get his or her client off no matter how. People will try to confuse you and get away from the case."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
As the jury selection process began in the bribery trial of state Sen. Ulysses S. Currie, the names of potential jurors were removed from their questionnaires before the forms were returned to lawyers. The redacting was done at the request of federal prosecutors — but not for the jurors' safety. It was meant to keep defense lawyers from Googling them before the trial, which is set to begin next week. If that happened, the court's "supervisory control over the jury selection process would, as a practical matter, be obliterated," prosecutors wrote in a letter to U.S. District Court Judge Richard D. Bennett.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
A jury in the trial of three men accused of killing former Baltimore City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris could be seated by Friday. If it is — and there is no guarantee, given how long the selection has taken — opening statements would begin Monday. The trial could last a month or more, the judge told a room full of prospective jurors Thursday morning. When he asked them whether such a long trial would be a hardship, dozens of hands shot into the air. The choice of a jury — a panel of 12, plus two alternates — began Sept.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 10, 2009
After watching Mayor Sheila Dixon stand for four hours straight at the judge's bench, next to the mostly male lawyers prosecuting her and those defending her, I thought of that famous line about Ginger Rogers. The one about how she did everything her much more renowned dance partner Fred Astaire did, only backward and in high heels. I don't mean to reduce Dixon to her four-inch black pumps. But then, Dixon is not only Baltimore's first female mayor, but its first to be in office and on trial simultaneously.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
Three weeks after a Howard County murder verdict was thrown into question by a juror's lack of U.S. citizenship, court officials and a state legislator say they are working to make sure the scenario is not repeated. Jury Commissioner Steve Merson has begun reviewing basic requirements for jury service during his morning talk to prospective jurors. At least one Howard prosecutor has added qualification inquiries to questions she wants judges to ask during voir dire, the process of interviewing prospective jurors in a courtroom.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
After two days of delays, Richard Antonio Moore was given his first look yesterday at the people who might decide his fate. Jury selection began in Harford County Circuit Court for Moore, 30, of Baltimore, who is charged with fatally shooting Baltimore County police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero last year. Prothero, 35, a father of five, was shot three times Feb. 7 as he chased four men after a robbery at J. Brown Jewelers in Pikesville, where he was working part-time as a security guard. Three other defendants have been convicted of first-degree felony murder in the shooting, but Moore is the only one to face the possibility of the death penalty.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2000
The manslaughter trial of Canadian dentist Alpna Patel finally got under way yesterday, despite attempts by her lawyers to delay proceedings because of publicity surrounding the unusual case. Ten women and two men were selected as jurors. In Patel's first trial in February, the jury panel had 11 women who wanted to acquit her, but the lone male juror wouldn't go along and a mistrial was declared. Patel is charged with manslaughter in the stabbing death last year of her physician husband at his Northwest Baltimore apartment.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
Linda Gomes doesn't mind performing jury duty -- she just wishes she didn't have to do it so often.Ms. Gomes and thousands of Howard County residents like her will get that wish next spring, when Circuit Court officials begin using a new program that will make it easier for them to meet their civic obligations.At a news conference today, state and county officials are expected to outline plans for a new jury selection system in Howard, one that officials hope will save tax dollars and call citizens for jury duty less often.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito brought an abrupt end yesterday to the first phase of jury selection in the O.J. Simpson murder trial and rejected a prosecution motion that would have postponed some juror questioning until after a hearing on scientific evidence.Calling the process of questioning prospective jurors about possible hardships "spectacular," Judge Ito announced yesterday morning that enough jury candidates already had emerged to allow him to end the interviews that he has used to determine who could serve on the panel.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2000
ATLANTA - The tedious process of picking a jury to hear the murder charges against Ray Lewis recessed on a fractious note yesterday as defense attorneys and prosecutors skirmished for tactical advantage. At 6 p.m. -- the latest the proceedings have gone all week - the judge, chief prosecutor and an attorney for Lewis all had law books in hand and were debating how many prospective jurors need to be called. The judge finally sent everyone home for the night and said she would settle the matter this morning.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
ATLANTA - It's been nearly five years since the not-guilty verdict was returned for O.J. Simpson, but that celebrated case has assumed a prominent role in the trial of Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis. Attorneys, who today begin the third day of jury selection, have quizzed virtually every prospective juror for his or her attitudes on the Simpson case. Legal experts say many judges, and even defense attorneys, would not allow that line of questioning in most cases. But the similarities between the trials of the two high-profile athletes charged with double murder makes it fair game here.
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