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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson plans to suggest in court this week that he is being prosecuted by the state's Democratic establishment only because he dared to work for Republicans, his attorney said Monday. Henson is accused of election fraud stemming from a 2010 Election Day "robocall" that prosecutors say was intended to trick black voters into staying home. But Henson's attorney contended Monday that prosecutors would not have brought the case had his client continued to work for Democrats, as he had in previous campaigns.
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SPORTS
June 23, 2014
Instead of more tax dollars going to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs ( "VA's acting chief tours Baltimore medical center," June 17), the new secretary should fire all the leadership at the VA that allowed the people who got bonuses based on wait time to cook the books and then prosecute all those who took bonuses they did not earn, which amounts to stealing tax dollars from us. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send...
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2010
A federal judge agreed Monday to defer prosecution of the grocery store chain at the center of a bribery case involving state Sen. Ulysses Currie, who was head of the Senate's powerful budgeting committee until his indictment this month. To avoid prosecution, SuperValu, the parent company of Shoppers Food & Pharmacy, must pay $2.5 million in the next two weeks and continue to cooperate in the prosecution of Currie and two former grocery store executives. U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett said he aims to set Currie's trial date for June.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 11, 2014
General Motors has fired 15 employees after an internal investigation into the company's handling of defective ignition switches that led to at least 13 fatalities. But the only way to stop lawbreaking at GM or any other big corporation is to prosecute the people who break the law. And so far, no one at GM has been prosecuted. "What GM did was break the law. ... They failed to meet their public safety obligations," scolded Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx after imposing the largest possible penalty on the giant automaker.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
I read with skepticism John Fritze's article ("Illegal migrants hope for reprieve," Nov. 19) on President Obama's new policy of separating illegal immigrants between those who have or haven't committed a crime. I compliment Mr. Fritze for not sugarcoating Mr. Alfaro's status as many now do as "undocumented. " Mr. Alfaro is in this country illegally and will not explain how he did this. This also consequently makes him an accessory with those who bring aliens to this country illegally.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
On Wednesday evening, I heard a good portion of Sen. Mitch McConnell's Senate address, in which he lambasted President Barack Obama for bringing terror suspects into the USA for trial and punishment in civilian courts and prisons, rather than trying them outside with military tribunals and incarcerating them at Guantanamo Bay ("US detains Somali target," July 6). While the good senator repeatedly warned that this practice poses a threat to domestic security and gives undue "privilege" to the suspects, I found myself feeling just a little bit proud of the president's direction in this case.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1995
When Scotland E. Williams goes on trial today on charges of shooting a husband and wife to death in their home last May, prosecutors will have an arsenal of evidence at their fingertips.Williams was videotaped using one victim's bank card. He was arrested wearing the other victim's watch, police say.The prosecution's witness list includes 27 police officers, 11 state and county police lab technicians, six experts from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, three state medical examiners and two privately retained scientists.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 15, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Caught between competing interests and faced with daunting legal complexities, prosecutors for a third straight day delayed a decision yesterday about whether to charge Al Cowlings with a crime for his role in O. J. Simpson's bizarre trek across Southern California freeways last month.Even though Mr. Cowlings, a lifelong friend and former teammate of Mr. Simpson's, is expected in court today, Los Angeles District Attorney's officials said they plan to ask for more time.On one side, police want to see Mr. Cowlings prosecuted for aiding a fugitive, but on the other, prosecutors are concerned that prosecuting him might complicate their double-murder case against Mr. Simpson.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
A police cruiser double-parked on Calvert Street with emergency lights flashing marked the arrival of widow Aldona Pilius for yesterday's start of Dontay Carter's murder trial.Murder cases are tried nearly every day in Baltimore Circuit Court. But the sight of the victim's wife, friends and relatives emerging from a police car outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse was just one sign that this one is hardly routine.Prosecutors, defense lawyers, reporters and curious court-watchers squeezed into Judge John N. Prevas' courtroom for the first trial in a February crime spree that left citizens looking over their shoulders while in downtown parking garages.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1990
Jurors in the Mapplethorpe obscenity trial walked into the jury room in Cincinnati Friday near the close of the two-week trial, regretting that the prosecution had not given them more evidence to go on, two jurors said yesterday in telephone interviews."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A surveillance camera near the East Baltimore murder scene spied a group from the Black Guerrilla Family gathered to congratulate a gang member on a job well done - a long-time rival was dead and a prior killing avenged. Henry Mills had been a BGF target since the gang started to take over the drug trade along a stretch of Greenmount Avenue years before, and he was suspected of murdering a senior BGF figure, authorities say. By 2011 Mills' insistence on running a freelance heroin operation on gang territory was too much to tolerate.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014
The scandal concerning the lack of health care by the Veterans Administration just continues with more deaths being attributed to the lack of attention to our veterans and horrible administration at VA hospitals. If the allegations are true, then the responsible individuals should be prosecuted and go to jail and not just be permitted to resign their positions in the VA. This is truly shameful, as it is being done to veterans who put their lives on line for this country. There is a 14-day waiting guideline for health care, but apparently some of these veterans were not seen for weeks and months, and to cover up this incompetence, fake waiting lists were created by VA hospital administrators.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is proposing to eliminate the state prosecutor's office, the independent agency that secured a string of high-profile political convictions in recent years. Gansler, a Democrat running for governor, called the office "a holdover from the Watergate era" that overlaps with other law enforcement offices and said scrapping it would save taxpayers as much as $1.2 million a year. But others called the proposal cause for concern, saying the agency's independence puts it in a unique position to prosecute government or electoral wrong-doing.
NEWS
By Zachary D. Spilman | March 31, 2014
Two high profile military sexual assault cases ended with big losses for the prosecution last month. At Fort Bragg in North Carolina, Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair pleaded guilty to reduced charges and received a light sentence of a written reprimand and a fine. At the Naval Academy in Maryland, Midshipman Joshua Tate was found not guilty of sexually assaulting an intoxicated female classmate. General Sinclair engaged in a lengthy affair with a subordinate who accused him of threatening her and forcing her to engage in sex acts, but who herself faced the possibility of disciplinary action for their inappropriate relationship.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 10, 2014
Over solid Republican objections, the Senate voted Monday night to remove the one-year statute of limitation on an existing law against using a handgun in a crime of violence or other felony. Senators voted 34-12 to approve and send to the House legislation sponsored by Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat, that would make the statute of limitations for the offense identical to that of the underlying crime. Frosh said the measure has the strong the strong support of the Maryland State's Attorney's Association.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Police officers rushed into the downtown parking garage, weapons drawn. As Detective Anthony Fata sat bleeding from a leg wound, officers scrambled around corners and up stairwells, frantically searching for a "junkie-looking black male. " The decorated 14-year veteran who'd made the emergency call - Signal 13: Officer Down - told of a violent struggle in which he was shot at close range. He also said that he had fallen down a flight of stairs while unloading his .40-caliber Glock, dislocating a shoulder.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Correspondent | January 29, 1992
OAKLAND -- Speaking on his own behalf, John Frederick Thanos today stood before his sentencing jury and preached to them about love, hate, evil, Jesus and Lucifer.In a 35-minute rambling discourse, in which a bespectacled Thanos read from notes and frequently gestured, Thanos called Sue A. Schenning, the prosecutor, an evil and "cunning, calculating woman."He accused the prosecutor of violating the law by reading parts of a pre-sentence report to the jury. He said the state's case was all about "hate."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 2005
The Supreme Court upheld the convictions of three men in a modern-day bootlegging case from Maryland yesterday, ruling 5-4 that the government could use U.S. wire fraud laws to prosecute a liquor smuggling operation that cost Canada millions of dollars in lost taxes. Brothers David and Carl Pasquantino and co-defendant Arthur "Butch" Hilts challenged their 2001 conviction, arguing that a centuries-old common law prohibiting the United States from enforcing the tax laws of another country should have blocked their prosecution.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The superintendent of the Naval Academy told a military judge Friday that his decision to prosecute a midshipman in a high-profile sexual assault case was not influenced by politicians, public pressure or his military supervisors. Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller spent more than three hours on the stand in a military court at the Washington Navy Yard defending his decision to pursue charges against Midshipman Joshua Tate. He rebutted the contention that the national spotlight on sexual assault in the military — including a pledge from President Barack Obama to root out sexual predators in the service — affected the way he has handled the case.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
A Maryland corrections officer is on trial in federal court this week as part of a broad case that began with the 2008 beating of an inmate at the Roxbury Correctional Institution near Hagerstown. Though Officer Josh Hummer is not accused in the beating of inmate Kenneth Davis, he is the first officer to be tried in U.S. court on the matter. At issue in Hummer's trial is what he saw when he walked past Davis' cell. Hummer, a sergeant at Roxbury, is accused of failing to stop other correctional officers from beating Davis, failing to summon medical attention, conspiring to cover up the incident, and misleading state investigators and administrative judges.
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